Four easy ways to stop your cell phone from spying on you

Image: Four easy ways to stop your cell phone from spying on you
Source: NaturalNews.com
D. Samuelson
March 30, 2017

Millions of Americans bow down to their smart phone, tweeting, typing and texting their politics, social grievances, emotional explosions, insecurities, purchases, investments, health concerns, musical tastes, children’s photos, travels, food cravings, collaborations, loves, hates and just about anything else imaginable. Most users know, and may not care, that the data they share is quickly sold to high tech marketers looking to make a buck by offering the user hyper-personalized products. ?

As reported by Readynutrition.com, Wikileaks has produced proof of the CIA’s ability to “identify and exploit vulnerabilities for the purpose of secretly collecting data on individuals” from “85% of the world’s smart phones.” The common link among these devices is that they run on the Android operating system by Google. Samsung phones and Sony phones are among those mentioned, along with certain social messaging apps like Clockman, Weibo and WhatsApp.

What’s even more chilling is a report by The Intercept, which documented that the National Security Agency (NSA) targets those they want to eliminate through “cell-phone tracking technologies.” In other words, after the NSA locates the SIM card, the CIA or the U.S military sends in the drone to kill the person holding that phone.

So how can you stop being monitored and block the signals from your smart phone? It’s amazingly simple. Mylar, best defined as a “strong polyester film” that can be used for insulation and storage bags, plays an important role in attaining your privacy. It’s used in three of these four strategies shared by Readynutrtion.com.

1. Mylar bags from snacks or chips

There are lots of sizes, and these bags are everywhere. You’ll need at least three layers. To avoid the residue salt or crumbs from the food, put your phone in a zip lock bag before placing it in the mylar snack bags. You can put duct tape around all three bags and create a secure pouch.

2. Mylar blankets and ponchos

If you don’t have a few mylar blankets or ponchos in your emergency kit, it’s time to get a few, along with some organic emergency storable food. Mylar ponchos and blankets are small and packable and not too pricey. Buy an extra one and cut it as needed for your smart phone. As before, you’ll need three layers for your bag or pouch.

3. Mylar freezer bags

This will work for your laptop as well. Again, three layers for the devices.

4. Military Issue Ammunition Bag

When you find one, it’s important that the rubber gasket is secure.

Before you snuggle your phone into its tracking proof bag, make sure it’s turned on and the volume is up all the way. Wrap it securely, then hold the bag with the phone close to your ear while you call your number from another phone. Only allow 3 rings, don’t let it go to  voice mail. If your phone is securely wrapped,  you won’t hear a thing. That’s a good sign.

With the mylar protection, or the ammo can, that “continuous signal your cell phone sends out every 4 seconds” is interrupted. With this new protection, you may miss a few calls, but now you have a choice to be tracked, or not.

RELATED: For more information on privacy and surveillance, visit Privacywatch.news.

Read More At: NaturalNews.com

Sources:

ReadyNutrition.com

TheIntercept.com

YourDictionary.com

CrowdStrike EXPOSED: Cybersecurity Firm In Damage-Control Mode

Source: RT
March 29, 2017

CrowdStrike, the cyber-security firm that initially claimed Russia hacked the DNC and tilted the 2016 election in Donald Trump’s favor, is being accused of misattribution of quotes in a December report. They have since walked back key claims in said report, calling their credibility into serious question. RT America’s Alexey Yaroshevsky has the story.

Book Review: Technocracy Rising – The Trojan Horse of Global Transformation


Source: Solari.com
Catherine Austin Fitts
January 14, 2017

“Society is built on three legs: Economics, politics and religion. These three must be mutually compatible or the society will not last long, and the dust bin of history has plenty of examples of societies that failed when division set in.”  ~Patrick M. Wood

We sit in the middle of an invisible war. Are we going to run society by rules and force or by laws and price?

Since WWII, the shadow government has used an Orwellian combination of invasive digital technology and covert operations and finance to build a new form of centralized governance to succeed where communism failed. Patrick Wood has documented this history in Technology Rising – the Trojan Horse of Global Transformation. He calls this new form of “command and control” governance  “technocracy.”

Documenting the emergence of a complex global rules based system is not easy to do. Wood has done us a remarkable service by attempting to integrate the various systems into a comprehensive overview.  For many years I have struggled to explain to financial professionals that the leadership does not want free markets – they want to communicate information through controlled networks rather than through prices. As long as the debt growth model could grow, an infinite amount of zero cost capital could paper over a society managed by command and control – albeit with highly sophisticated information systems, analytics and artificial intelligence.

One of the challenges of building a rules based model is that it does not permit the healthy communication, competition and cooperation that occurs through markets and market prices. This results in poor communication and leads to behavior contradictory to sound economic choices or choices that support healthy labor and human productivity. In part, the backlash we are watching globally is coming from people responsible for operations whose productivity is being frustrated and destroyed as well as from people whose financial health is being destroyed who can understand this is unnecessary in the face of trillions of dollars lost to corruption and waste.

The technocracy model is not working. Applying more fake news, false flags and surveillance to “double down” is not making it work either.

Woods points out the importance of the political and economic model being compatible with religion. This helps explain the extraordinary efforts made by those promoting the technocracy to also debase our culture, strip the sacred from our lives and promote values that support an inhuman society.

A command and control society managed by powerful, invisible and invasive technology leads to microchipped people mind controlled through a “smart grid.” Instead, a market economy managed with prices will deliver the message that rings true throughout history — information and people both want to be free.

Technocracy Rising will help you understand why our governance structures have become to resemble a new form of psychopathy and why the battle unfolding in Washington at its root is about whether or not we will choose to have a human or inhuman society.

The more the President-elect mentions price, the more nervous the technocrats get.

Read More At: Solari.com

The FBI Has Secretly Gathered Millions of “Faceprints” For Biometric Database For Years

Source: AcvistPost.com
Derrick Broze
March 24, 2017

A representative of the FBI was grilled by the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform regarding the agency’s growing biometric database. 

Washington D.C. – On Wednesday the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform questioned Kimberly Del Greco, Deputy Assistant Director at the FBI’s Criminal Justice Information Services Division, about why the bureau broke the law by failing to file a privacy impact statement acknowledging the collection of millions of Americans’ faces for the agency’s new biometric identification system. The FBI’s Next Generation Identification (NGI) system is made up of fingerprints, iris scans, faceprints, and other facial recognition data. The NGI organizes Americans’ biometric data into a single file that includes personal and biographic data like name, home address, ID number, immigration status, age, race, etc.

The Committee reports that nearly half of all adult Americans’ photographs are in the database. The 2013 U.S. Census Bureau estimated that there are over 242 million adults living in the U.S. If the Committee’s numbers are correct, over 121 million adults are in the FBI’s database. Other revelations include that 18 states have a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with the FBI to share photos with the federal government, including from state departments of motor vehicles (DMV). According to the Electronic Privacy Information Center:

With NGI, the FBI will expand the number of uploaded photographs and provide investigators with ‘automated facial recognition search capability.’ The FBI intends to do this by eliminating restrictions on the number of submitted photographs (including photographs that are not accompanied by tenprint fingerprints) and allowing the submission of non-facial photographs (e.g. scars or tattoos).The FBI also widely disseminates this NGI data. According to the FBI’s latest NGI fact sheet, 24,510 local, state, tribal, federal and international partners submitted queries to NGI in September 2016.

Committee Chairman Congressman Jason Chaffetz (R- Utah) scolded Ms. Del Greco for the FBI’s failures. “The failure here is years after you were supposed to make it public,” Chaffetz stated. “You were using it in real world circumstances, you were actually using it and didn’t issue the statement.” Chaffetz also asked Del Greco whether the FBI had plans to gather faceprints via social media. “Are you collecting that information that is available on social media?,” the chairman demanded. “We do not have any other photos in our repository.”

Alvaro Bedoya, Executive Director, Center on Privacy and Technology Georgetown Law, questioned the FBI’s claim, stating that the bureau has access to driver’s license photos. “We have access to that data but we do not use it,” Del Greco answered. Jennifer Lynch, Senior Staff attorney with the Electronic Frontier Foundation also stated that the FBI has access to “civil photos” in the NGI database.

Rep. Paul Mitchell (R-MI) also questioned Del Greco regarding the FBI’s activities. “I think the issue goes beyond the First Amendment concerns that were expressed. . .and is broader,” Mitchell stated during the panel. “I don’t want to just protect someone if they’re in a political protest from being identified, the reality is we should protect everybody unless there is a valid documented criminal justice action. Why should my photo. . .be subject because I get a driver’s license, to access?” Rep. John Duncan (R-TN) expressed similar fear regarding the possibility that the expectation of privacy is quickly fading. Duncan worried that Americans looking at the information, “would wonder if were ending up in a federal police state that’s gotten totally out of control, and has far too much power.”

Duncan is not far off. The databases include photos those of people who aren’t suspected of any criminal activity that come from driver’s license and passport and visa photos. Other issues with the FBI database include misidentifying females and blacks at a higher rate. The FBI is currently facing a lawsuit from EPIC regarding the database. EPIC is asking a judge to force the FBI to release records about its plan to share the biometric data with the U.S. Department of Defense. EPIC filed a Freedom of Information Act request in 2015, but the FBI has so far refused to release the 35 pages of responsive records.

EPIC and privacy advocates are concerned about the potential for cases of mistaken identity and abuse of the collected data. EPIC also argues “the FBI stated that ‘[i]ncreased collection and retention of personally identifiable information presents a correspondingly increased risk that the FBI will then be maintaining more information that might potentially be subject to loss or unauthorized use.”

In 2014, the EFF received documents from the FBI related to the NGI system. At the time the FBI estimated the facial recognition component of NGI would include as many as 52 million face images by 2015. The Committee’s hearing on Wednesday indicated that number was more than double as of 2017.  The danger of abuse from facial recognition programs is on the rise. Activist Post recently highlighted a new report from Georgetown Law University’s Center for Privacy and Technology that details how law enforcement is using facial recognition software without the knowledge or consent of the people. The report, “The Perpetual Line-Up: Unregulated Police Face Recognition in America,” examines several cases of misuse or abuse of facial recognition technology.

How can we protect our privacy in a world that is quickly becoming a digitally interconnected panopticon of audio recording devices, faceprint collection machines, and cameras from every direction? The answer is not simple. Most of us live our lives with these devices and use them for several hours each day. When we are staring into our phones to send text messages, the camera is potentially stealing our faceprint and sending it to your cell phone provider and/or law enforcement. We are giving away our privacy for convenience, luxury, and entertainment. How can we stop the fast march to a total surveillance state? Perhaps abandoning all technology and living off the land. Short of that, we need to take measures to encrypt our communication and practice a culture of security.

Read More At: ActivistPost.com

#DarkSeaSkies: How the CIA Can Control Your MacBook in Just 29 Seconds

iPhone

Source: TheDailySheeple.com
March 26, 2017

It’s known as DarkSeaSkies…. Hacking tools that allows the CIA access to Apple products. One knicknamed the “Sonic Screwdriver” gives an agent the ability to hack and remotely control a MacBook Air in less than half a minute.

Delivered via “supply chain intercept or gift to the target,” DarkSeaSkies runs in the background and gives the CIA remote control of the laptop. The 2009 “user requirements” make it sound like this one requires a thumb drive: “It is assumed that an operator or asset has one-time physical access to the target system and can boot the target system to an external flash drive.”

Well, at least they required physical proximity to your laptop for at least 29 seconds eight years ago.

Now? Well, technology has come a long way in just a decade.

RT reports:

DarkSeaSkies is actually made up of three components, Dark Matter, SeaPea and NightSkies.

DarkMatter is installed in a computer’s kernal-space (core of computer’s operating system, usually in protected area of memory). It then installs the other two components of the tool, SeaPea and NightSkies.

SeaPea is installed in the kernal and executes and hides NightSkies, which is implanted in the user the space (computer’s memory area that deals with apps and software).

“All files, network connections, and processes associated with the NightSkies beacon are hidden by the SeaPea root-kit,” the document reads. NightSkies is the beaconing tool used to monitor and send information from the phone to a Listening Post (LP), which collects the incoming data.

And that’s that. NightSkies, made up of an implant that runs undetected, a Listening Post (LP) and a post-processing program is used by the CIA to infiltrate, track, and remotely control iPhones. The LP works like a “drop box,” sucking up a persons email metadata, their browser histories including Internet and YouTube… you name it.

The kicker?

RT notes Apple’s supply chain had to have been compromised by the CIA long before 2008, however:

The revelation that the CIA is physically infiltrating factory fresh phones suggests it has accessed the organization’s supply chain, meaning they may be accessing phones as they are shipped to targets, with CIA agents or assets physically tampering with suspects’ phones before they even receive them.

The fact that NightSkies was on version 1.2 by 2008 suggests it had been employed before then. The document references a 1.1 version, and explains that NightSkies has the capability to self-upgrade once installed.

You have to wonder: has it really dawned on people how late in the game we are at this point if the government has direct access and control of your computer and phone???

Read More At: TheDailySheeple.com

Everything you search for on Google is now easily obtained by police

Image: Everything you search for on Google is now easily obtained by police
Source: NaturalNews.com
JD Heyes
March 22, 2017

If you thought that your search engine history was private, think again. It’s not. Or, at least, it may not be, depending on whether or not you’re under police investigation.

According to The Free Thought Project, a court in Minnesota has recently ruled that an entire city’s search history should be made available to police, an Orwellian first as far as anyone can tell. It may well mark the beginning of the end of Internet freedom.

Cops in Edina, Minn., were granted a warrant that requires search giant Google to provide search history information and the names of everyone in the city who utilized specific search terms between Dec. 1, 2016, and Jan. 7, 2017. (RELATED: BOMBSHELL Investigation: Google An “Information Dominance” Front For The CIA)

Now mind you, this case isn’t about a nuclear bomb plot, a planned act of terrorism, a major jewel heist or child porn. Rather, ARS Technica notes, the case is about alleged wire fraud worth less than $30,000. But if Google honors the warrant, like it probably will have to do since the warrant is a legal document issued by a valid court, that would be a horrible precedent moving forward because it could be duplicated by departments all over the country.

ARS Technica reports that police investigators are looking for an online picture of a person with the same name as a local victim of financial fraud because said image was found on a phony passport that was utilized to fool a credit union into transferring some $28,500 out of a man’s account who takes up residence in Edina. Someone faxed the fake passport to the credit union as ‘proof’ of identity under a spoofed phone number to mimic the victim’s phone, the search warrant notes.

The Free Thought Project reported further:

The ominously worded warrant makes some chilling demands — all over a small fraud case.

A Google search, the warrant application says, as reported by Ars Technica, reveals the photo used on the bogus passport. The image was not rendered on Yahoo or Bing, according to the documents. The warrant commands Google to divulge “any/all user or subscriber information”—including e-mail addresses, payment information, MAC addresses, social security numbers, dates of birth, and IP addresses—of anybody who conducted a search for the victim’s name.

What makes this warrant so worrisome, especially if Google complies with it, is that it seems to go far beyond the legal standard of probable cause. While it appears likely that something illegal may have happened, it’s obvious that most, if not all, of the people in Edina are not guilty of doing anything wrong. Granted, cops have to investigate but how can a court reasonably assume that everyone in an entire city is under suspicion, thereby satisfying the legal standard of probable cause?

That seems a stretch, to say the least.

What also seems very likely, then, is that police will obtain evidence that may implicate other criminal activity, and while you may applaud that, understand that such overly broad searches were never envisioned by our founding fathers, hence the adoption of the Fourth Amendment, which is supposed to protect against “unreasonable searches.” (RELATED: BREAKING: Police Are Now Routinely Taking Items Out Of Unlocked Cars To ‘Protect’ Citizens From Theft)

The Fourth Amendment originally enforced the notion that ‘each man’s home is his castle,’ secure from unreasonable searches and seizures of property by the government,” Cornell University Law School notes in describing the purpose of the amendment. “It protects against arbitrary arrests, and is the basis of the law regarding search warrants, stop-and-frisk, safety inspections, wiretaps, and other forms of surveillance, as well as being central to many other criminal law topics and to privacy law.”

So it seems apparent a city-wide “search” of Google records is far and away outside the scope of what is allowable under the Constitution. It’s hard to tell what is worse – that a police department would make such a request or that a court would grant it.

J.D. Heyes is a senior writer for NaturalNews.com and NewsTarget.com, as well as editor of The National Sentinel.

Read More At: NaturalNews.com

Sources:

TheFreeThoughtProject.com

ARSTechnica.com

GoodGopher.com

Information released about Google’s mishandling of public health data is horrifying

Image: Information released about Google’s mishandling of public health data is horrifying
Source: NaturalNews.com
JD Heyes
March 20, 2017

In a recent interview on Jimmy Kimmel Live, comedian and actor Tim Allen decried the data collection and surveillance of two of the world’s biggest corporations: Amazon and Google.

Saying that Amazon knows “way too much about us,” he also said this:

If the government drove down the street in a gray sedan with a camera on it, you’d be rioting, going to Washington. But if it’s white, with emojis and ‘Google’ on it, ‘Yay! You’re waving at it! They’re taking pictures of your house!

Who are these people? I wanted to put FU on the top of my house.

Allen appears to be referring to Google Maps and Google Street View, both of which contain databases of physical locations of our homes and businesses, which he rightfully intimates is a huge privacy issue. (RELATED: Google And Facebook Are The New NSA)

Well, that’s not the only database that Google maintains and, apparently, abuses. As noted by Motherboard, Google subsidiary DeepMind, an artificial intelligence firm that jumped into healthcare data storage in 2015, has been lambasted in a new report critical of the firm’s patient privacy approach regarding the UK’s National Health Service (NHS).

“DeepMind had not built a piece of healthcare software in its entire existence, and so, to have it just be walked over to by physicians and have an entire hospital’s worth of identifiable patient data given to them on trust seems a bit much to me,” report co-author Hal Hodson told Motherboard.

At issue, Hodson found, were a number of occasions where DeepMind compromised personally identifiable information (PII) on millions of patients.

In July 2015 physicians with Great Britain’s public hospital system requested that DeepMind create software using patient data supplied to it by the NHS. Around four months later, the PII on 1.6 million patients found its way to third-party servers within firms processing data for DeepMind’s software development project supposedly tied to patients at risk of acute kidney problems.

An April 2016 probe by Hodson, who was employed by New Scientist at the time, found that DeepMind had much more access to patient data than the company had revealed publicly. The firm was handling data and other information related to patients with HIV, who had suffered through drug overdoses and women who had gotten abortions dating back five years.

Hodson wrote in his academic report that it was only after a New Science article revealed as much “that any public conversation occurred about the nature, extent, and limits of the DeepMind-Royal Free data transfer.”

He concluded in his paper that the fact that DeepMind actually obtained access to more data than it claimed should serve as a warning.

“By doing so badly at the start, it will be harder for them going forward, but I also think potentially it’s good,” Hodson told Motherboard. “There’s now a lot more scrutiny, people are paying more attention to this stuff.” (RELATED: WATCH OUT: Google Is Recording Everything You Search And Say)

How much data does Google have, exactly? Apparently enough that it fronts as a data hub for the CIA, as noted by Mike Adams, the Health Ranger, in February:

One of the fascinating things that’s happening as a side effect of Natural News being blacklisted by Google is that thousands of people are contacting us with information about the hidden history of Google. As we are coming to discover, Google isn’t an innocent, friendly search engine created to help humanity… it’s actually an extension of the deep state that seeks to dominate and enslave all of humanity.

He noted a separate report by Insurge Intelligence which found that the CIA essentially made Google by funding, nurturing and incubating it as a means of dominating the world through control of information. The search giant was apparently seeded with money from both the CIA and the NSA, “merely the first among a plethora of private sector start-ups co-opted by U.S. intelligence to retain ‘information superiority,’” the investigative journalism project reported.

J.D. Heyes is a senior writer for NaturalNews.com and NewsTarget.com, as well as editor of The National Sentinel.

Read More At: NaturalNews.com

Sources:

PrivacyWatch.news

Medium.com

Motherboard.Vice.com

TheNationalSentinel.com