Prostate Cancer BREAKTHROUGH: Three natural substances destroy cancer cells

Source: TheHealthRanger
June 30, 2017

Breakthrough research finds that prostate cancer cells are destroyed by a combination of three natural compounds found in a fruit peel, a berry skin and a root tuber. These three anti-cancer nutrients are safe, affordable and readily available to everyone. So why isn’t the entire medical industry talking about this prostate cancer breakthrough? Because there’s NO MONEY to be made from making people well using low-cost anti-cancer foods and plants. Stay informed at AntiCancer.news.

It’s Never Been More Important to Support Independent Content Creators


Source: LibertyBlitzkrieg.com
Michael Krieger
June 30, 2017

When I first started this website I didn’t have a plan for monetization. While I certainly believe people should be compensated for hard, useful work, all I wanted to do was read, write and think. The “business side” of running a blog felt like a nuisance and wasn’t something I had much passion or energy for. That hasn’t changed.

What has changed is passively putting third party code like Google Adsense on your website doesn’t really earn someone like me any money. While it was never a significant amount of cash in the first place, it wasn’t totally worthless. At this point it has become basically worthless, but that’s ok. I’m not going to complain about Google. Google doesn’t owe me anything and neither do the corporations that use the network. It was never a smart way for writers, particularly anti-establishment type writers highly critical of our economic system based on cronyism and fraud, to earn money. It never really made any sense, but I went down that road anyway because it was easy and allowed me to focus on what I really cared about, my work. But things have changed.

Advertisers have begun to flex their muscles over the past year or so, with YouTube demonetizing videos with any sort of unconventional political bent. From the advertisers’ perspective this makes perfect sense and there’s no point in complaining about it. This has forced many content producers to shift to a more reader supported model, which I think is far more empowering and healthy in the long-term despite painful short-term hits to revenue. Indeed, we shouldn’t trust any media that relies on large corporate advertisers to fund their “journalism,” as the product will be more like public relations than any hard-hitting truth to power. We’ve already seen that advertisers are willing to flex their muscles when it comes to content they don’t like, and we can expect that to accelerate going forward.

The latest warning sign comes courtesy of a Washington Post policy that forbids employees from disparaging advertisers. The Washingtonian reports:

A new social-media policy at the Washington Post prohibits conduct on social media that “adversely affects The Post’s customers, advertisers, subscribers, vendors, suppliers or partners.” In such cases, Post management reserves the right to take disciplinary action “up to and including termination of employment.”

The Post‘s Guild sent out a bulletin Sunday night protesting the policy. “If you’re like most of us, you probably acknowledged its receipt without reading it,” says the note, which was written by Guild co-chair Fredrick Kunkle.But what you don’t know could hurt you.”

The guild wants to jettison other parts of the policy, which the Post confirms to Washingtonian went into effect on May 1 and applies to the entire company:

  • A provision that prohibits employees from “Disparaging the products and services of The Post’s advertisers, subscribers, competitors, business partners or vendors.”

  • A demand that employees “Refrain from using social media while on your work time, unless using Social Media is an authorized part of your job.”

  • A clause that encourages employees to snitch on one another: “If you have any reason to believe that an employee may be in violation of The Post’s Social Media Policy … you should contact the Post’s Human Resources Department.”

I thought part of the appeal of a billionaire like Jeff Bezos owning a “paper of record” is that it might make it less beholden to large powerful interests than you might otherwise expect. Guess not.

One thing the last twelve months should make clear to everyone reading this is that billionaire-owned corporate media cannot and should not be trusted to provide honest information, and will definitely never challenge the true centers of power in society. This makes the need for independent publishers more crucial than ever, and since such publishers cannot and should not depend on corporate advertisers, readers need to step up and support them. I’m not talking about my work specifically, I’m talking about all of the independent content creators you enjoy. Support all of them.

On Friday, I plan to publish an article outlining my plan for turning Liberty Blitzkrieg into a reader-supported publication in the years ahead. I think that’s the only sustainable way to stay on point, refrain from the temptations of clickbait, and avoid the whims of corporate advertisers and Google.

Stay tuned for more.

Meanwhile, if you enjoyed this post, and want to contribute to genuine, independent media, consider visiting our Support Page.

In Liberty,
Michael Krieger

Read More At: LibertyBlitzkrieg.com

The NSA and the 9/11 Deception

Source: CorbettReport
June 30, 2017

TRANSCRIPT AND SOURCES: http://www.corbettreport.com/?p=8602

As the public finally becomes outraged over the NSA’s illegal spying, members of government and the corporate media wage an information war to misdirect that anger to issues of less importance. To counteract this, a bold new citizen-led initiative to nullify the NSA is now gaining momentum around the United States. This is the GRTV Backgrounder on Global Research TV.

What To Expect From Libraries In The 21st Century: Pam Sandlian Smith At TEDxMileHigh

Source: TEDx Talks
Dec 16, 2013

Why do we still need libraries in the age of digital, real-time information? In this emotional talk, Pam Sandlian Smith shows how she works to use the library as a hub for community-based knowledge creation and discourse.

The Fat Wars: What’s A Health-Conscious Consumer To Do?

The Fat Wars: What's A Health-Conscious Consumer To Do?
Source: GreenMedInfo.com
Jennie Ann Freiman MD
June 29, 2017

The recent release of the American Heart Association (AHA) advisory on dietary fats and cardiovascular disease is a call to action, but exactly what that action should be is debatable. 

The recent release of the American Heart Association (AHA) advisory on dietary fats and cardiovascular disease is a call to action, but exactly what that action should be is debatable. The AHA recommends replacing dietary saturated fat with unsaturated fat, especially polyunsaturated fat (in an overall healthful dietary plan) as a strategy to lower the risk of cardiovascular disease. The panel offers a one-size-fits-all recommendation, specifically the goal of lowering LDL, AKA “bad” cholesterol, as the primary, actionable risk-reducing measure. Their controversial comment that got health partisans in an uproar was: “we advise against the use of coconut oil.” Reactions ran the gamut from support to outrage, and as expected, resulted in sensational clickbait:

“Coconut oil isn’t healthy. It’s never been healthy.” Ashley May / USA Today

The internet is rife with opinion, so what’s a health-conscious consumer to do? The AHA based their recommendations on a review of population studies and randomized trials but those do not speak to any one individual’s personal risk. Regardless of your dietary bias, laboratory testing is an objective way to get a handle on cardiovascular risk and the potential need for dietary intervention.

Traditional cholesterol testing is not the most accurate way to assess cardiovascular risk. A quick screen that only checks total cholesterol can be very misleading. Total cholesterol measures the aggregate of HDL (“good” cholesterol) and LDL (“bad” cholesterol) in your bloodstream, but that doesn’t tell the whole story. For example, a high cholesterol superficially suggests an elevated risk for cardiovascular disease, but in fact, the risk is low if a very high amount of HDL (“good” cholesterol) is responsible for upping the total number. On the other hand, a normal total cholesterol may be falsely reassuring, if LDL makes up most of the value. Including a more complete “lipid profile” in annual medical testing is the minimum required for actionable information, but even that isn’t enough.

The generally accepted recommendations for cholesterol values come from the  National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. Triglycerides, one of the very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL) are a risk factor for cardiovascular disease fully independent of cholesterol levels. Excess calories are converted to triglycerides and stored in fat cells. VLDL are precursors in the production of LDL cholesterol. Risk assessment based on cholesterol and triglycerides is far more accurate than basing it on either of those values alone. It should be noted that cardiovascular disease also rises when total cholesterol is too low; there is a sweet spot.

Natural Alternatives to Deadly Prescription Opiates

To dig deeper and uncover even more valuable cardiovascular risk information, it’s necessary to fractionate LDL and HDL into their respective subtypes. Both particle number and size influence risk. Large, fluffy, buoyant LDL particles are cardio-protective. The bad guys, the ones that increase the risk of cardiovascular disease as much as threefold, are the small, dense, sticky LDL particles which promote inflammation, and increase blood clotting and plaque formation. As many as one third of those with low LDL levels, which seem superficially favorable, actually have increased risk because of elevated levels of hazardous, small LDL particles. Interestingly, low-carbohydrate diets selectively lower small particle LDL more than overall LDL, thus lowering cardiovascular risk. The NMR LipoProfile test evaluates lipoprotein particle size and number along with markers of insulin resistance to derive a more comprehensive view of cardiovascular risk.

Natural Alternatives to Deadly Prescription Opiates

The VAP (Vertical Auto Profile) test goes even further in assessing cardiovascular risk by breaking down LDL into four measurable risk sub-factors: total LDL cholesterol, real LDL cholesterol, lipoprotein-a and intermediate density lipoproteins. The results generate very different dietary and supplement/pharmaceutical interventions that can be tailored into a treatment program targeting each individual’s specific results. Generic recommendations including low carb intake or a low fat diet, omega-3 supplements, niacin, statins and exercise do not optimize individual risk reduction.

Natural Alternatives to Deadly Prescription Opiates

“After reading the AHA report in its entirety, I have no intention of reducing my daily dietary intake of coconut oil and ghee.” Jennie Ann Freiman MD

The AHA recommendations for dietary actions to reduce cardiovascular risk are flawed:

  • The AHA advises against the dietary use of coconut oil while simultaneously admitting, “clinical trials that compare direct effects on CVD (cardiovascular disease) of coconut oil and other dietary oils have not been reported.”
  • All of the studies supporting the AHA conclusions were performed in North America and Europe, on populations whose diet is not based on coconut oil.
  • Avoiding a more nuanced look at cardiovascular risk factors is simplistic and reductive, in no way reflecting the best interest of consumers serious about improving health.
  • The 2015-2020 US Dietary Guidelines no longer recommend lowering cholesterol and place no limit on dietary fat or cholesterol intake.

When deciding whether or not to include coconut oil, which is about 90% saturated fat, as part of a heart healthy diet, consider these facts:

  • Coconut oil raises total and HDL cholesterol.
  • Coconut oil lowers triglycerides and central, abdominal fat, both independent risk factors for cardiovascular disease.
  • Coconut oil reduces insulin resistance, another independent cardiovascular risk factor.
  • Countries with highest dietary intake of coconut oil are among those with lowest incidence of cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular risk rises when refined vegetable oils, specifically those recommended by the AHA, are introduced to these populations.

For those choosing to incorporate coconut oil in an overall health plan, stick to organic, unrefined, virgin coconut oil.

Health can’t possibly be promoted by any one-size-fits-all recommendation because those don’t take into account the infinite variety in our diet and lifestyle. To find out what’s right for you, a good start is to assess cardiovascular risk based on laboratory results, but don’t forget those values are only one part of an overall cardiovascular risk-reducing lifestyle that should include exercise, sleep hygiene and stress management.

Before dismissing coconut oil as risky, remember current AHA recommendations come from the same group who previously endorsed the now-disavowed low-fat-high-carb diet approach and failed to recognize the risks of trans fats in a timely manner. The rate of cardiovascular disease in Western populations has skyrocketed over the last fifty years or so, in tandem with what the AHA, governmental and other health professional organizations told us to do.

Read More At: GreenMedInfo.com
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REFERENCES:

AHA advisory:
http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/early/2017/06/15/CIR.0000000000000510
coconut oil:
http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/50-latest-coconut-oil-benefits-backed-science
cholesterol too low:
http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/underreported-dangers-low-cholesterol

insulin resistance:
http://www.greenmedinfo.com/article/virgin-coconut-oil-could-be-efficient-nutraceutical-preventing-development

HDL cholesterol AND waist circumference (same link):
http://www.greenmedinfo.com/article/diet-rich-extra-virgin-coconut-oil-seems-favour-reduction-waist-circumference
Additional reference available on request.

Disclaimer: This article is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of GreenMedInfo or its staff.