Left Right Paradigm, India Kicks Out Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation – #NewWorldNextWeek

Source: TheCorbettReport
James Corbett
February 13, 2017

Welcome to New World Next Week – the video series from Corbett Report and Media Monarchy that covers some of the most important developments in open source intelligence news. This week:

Story #1: 92% Of Berlin Left-Wing Activists Live With Their Parents
http://bit.ly/2kUOzMb

“92 Per Cent Of The Radically Left-Wing Ones Still Live With Mummy”
http://bit.ly/2kJFxzz

“If You Are Not a Liberal at 25, You Have No Heart. If You Are Not a Conservative at 35 You Have No Brain”
http://bit.ly/2gXJOx2

Is the Agenda a New Civil War?
http://bit.ly/2kGxV0A

Police Paid Informants £19.5M In Five Years
http://bit.ly/2kJzoDo

Story #2: Firm That Helped Feds Crack iPhone Gets Hacked, Tools Leaked Online
http://bit.ly/2kV7PJl

#MorningMonarchy: Israeli Phone Hacking Firm Cellebrite Confirms “Information Security Breach” (Jan. 17, 2017 ~ Coverage @ 23:58)
http://bit.ly/2ktNV7B

Derrick Broze Explains Jeff Sessions’ War on Encryption
http://bit.ly/2lpT7He

Ohio Man’s Pacemaker Data Betrays Him In Arson, Insurance Fraud Case
http://bit.ly/2k4NWAC

#MorningMonarchy: The Pacemaker Panopticon
http://bit.ly/2kool1i

Story #3: Gates Foundation Mission Shut Down In India For Big Pharma Ties
http://bit.ly/2kPYK5e

Beware Americans Bearing Gifts: NGOs as Trojan Horses
http://bit.ly/2kQ5cJp

Police State Special: Guy Gets Tasered & Arrested, For…Wait For it…DANCING. Yes, No Joke.

Source: TheFreeThoughtProject.com
Matt Agorist
February 12, 2017

Austin, TX — In today’s ‘See Something, Say Something’ society, doing the ‘pee pee dance’ while waiting for a bus is grounds for police action — at least that’s what a woman in Austin thought when she called the cops on a dancing man. Unfortunately, for the dancing man, police would also perceive his harmless behavior as a threat and move to neutralize it.

This latest instance of ridiculous police brutality was captured on video Tuesday outside of an Austin restaurant. As the video begins, a nicely dressed man was standing at a bus stop doing a bit of a sidestep dance in place. The officer responding to the fearful woman’s 911 call perceived this dance as a potentially dangerous act.

The dancing man appeared to have a mental imbalance and may have flipped the bird at someone driving by. According to witnesses at the scene, the man may have had “some kind of disorder” and a “mental imbalance of some kind.” However, this was not grounds for what happened next.

In the video, we see the man doing nothing other than dancing when the officer approaches him as if he’s holding a child hostage. Within just a few moments the officer has his taser drawn, aiming it at the man’s head.

When the bus shows up, the man attempts to get on it, as it appears that was his intention the entire time. However, the cop would not have it. As the man attempted to walk toward the bus, the cop waved it on.

“He didn’t do anything,” a bystander says just before the situation turns violent. “He’s just standing there, minding his own business.”

Then, boom, taser goes off, and the man falls to the ground.

For dancing, this man was shot with a taser and then tackled, assaulted, and handcuffed.

“Stop tasering him, you asshole,” a bystander yells as the cop continues his assault.

“Am I under arrest,” the man keeps asking as the cop sits on him.

“Put your hands behind your back and stop resisting,” says the officer to the man who is lying face down and not resisting at all.

At this point, another officer shows up and apparently had no other way to join in the assault, so he started grabbing the man’s legs and twisting them.

“What the fuck, you can’t do that,” another bystander yells.

“He is not even moving,” a woman says.

A third cop then shows up and the officers, clearly at a loss for what their justification was for attacking the man, simply stand around and talk about ‘safety.’

For good measure, to make sure this handcuffed dancing man, who had harmed no one, would be absolutely neutralized — a fourth cop showed up.

“Four cop cars for a person that was appearing a little unstable but not bothering anyone,” says the woman taking the video.

10 Sinister State Moves, Including Killing Protesters, Prove 1st Amendment Is Dying


via: ActivistPost.com
Source: FreeThoughtProject.com
Claire Bernish
January 28, 2017

“Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.”

President Donald Trump’s first week in office has seen a tumultuous mix of sweeping executive actions peppered with a few pleasant surprises; but if one thing proves true — as with the first term of any new president — there will be cause for someone to protest something.

Indeed, before Trump even took the oath of office, protesters descended on Washington, D.C. — marching en masse down the middle of typically congested roadways, chanting, screaming, and generally causing the sort of disruptions demonstrators seek in order to draw attention to a cause.

But that most basic right — to air one’s grievances to elected leaders in a public forum, often through disruption — might soon be a risky endeavor in at least ten states, as protest is gradually being criminalized in rather astonishing ways.

Lawmakers from North Dakota and Minnesota, to Virginia and the state of Washington, have proposed or passed legislation levying hefty penalties against anyone who dares to exercise the basic right to protest against — ironically enough — legislation and policy found to be untenable.

At the rate such laws have rapidly come to fruition, even if legislators in your state have yet to propose obstacles to protesting, the following list should serve as a guide for potential future strictures regarding your right to speak out.

1. NORTH DAKOTA

North Dakota lawmakers have proposed arguably the most crushing measures against protesters — seemingly specifically targeting water protectors opposing construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline.

Under House Bill 1203, drivers would be permitted to run down protesters — literally — so long as they claim they didn’t intend to do so. As the proposed bill states,

“Notwithstanding any other provision of law, a driver of a motor vehicle who unintentionally causes injury or death to an individual obstructing vehicular traffic on a public road, street, or highway, is not guilty of an offense.”

In other words, if a protester in a roadway were to be struck by a vehicle and killed, the driver would not be charged with a crime if they claimed, for example, accidentally hitting the accelerator instead of the brakes.

House Majority Leader Al Carlson proffered a second bill criminalizing wearing masks to protests; and, though the legislation would allow exceptions for harsh weather conditions and holidays wear face coverings are traditional, it’s an open question how police might interpret those exemptions.

“I would be the first to defend your right of free speech and freedom of assembly,” Carlson told a state legislative committee hearing on Tuesday of House Bill 1304, according to the Billings Gazette. “I’m always concerned when there’s a reason that, I believe, may be used to hide your identity when you’re creating some kind of disturbance.”

Should the legislation pass, masks would not be permitted at demonstrations on public property or roadways — nor on private property, unless the owner gives explicit, written consent.

2. MISSOURI

Missouri legislators are also hoping to criminalize mask-wearing at protests in a bill that would make intentional concealment of one’s “identity by the means of a robe, mask, or other disguise” at any gathering deemed an “unlawful assembly” punishable as a Class A misdemeanor — with a penalty of up to one full year behind bars.

3. MINNESOTA

As alarming as it might be that a mask could land you in jail in Missouri or that North Dakota drivers can run down protesters without facing charges, Minnesota lawmakers took the criminalization of demonstrations in an equally shocking but wholly different direction — the wallet.

Minnesotans whose protests force police to intervene would be financially liable for the cost of the intervention should Rep. Nick Zerwas’ legislation by written into law.

As the Star Tribune reports, a committee meeting on Tuesday “ended abruptly after a House panel passed Zerwas’ proposed legislation that would give cities authority to charge protesters for police services if the demonstrators are convicted of illegal assembly or public nuisance. The measure would also give cities the option of suing convicted protesters to recoup expenses from policing the demonstration.”

Furious residents disrupted that meeting, rightly questioning the measure’s constitutionality and what the bill would mean for future ability to demonstrate against acts of police violence, as in the shooting death of Philando Castile in 2016 — or in any instance where complaint falls on deaf ears and public assembly stands as the only option.

Zerwas and the bill’s supporters, however, side with Minnesotans who resent large demonstrations, and say the financial onus of policing protests should fall on those participating.

“I have an entire constituency that feels as though protesters believe that their rights are more important than everyone else’s,” Zerwas explained in an interview cited by the Guardian. “Well, there is a cost to that. Rosa Parks sat in the front of the bus. She didn’t get out and lay down in front of the bus.”

He added, “The meters are running and the taxpayers are holding the bag.”

And as the Intercept reports, “In addition to the highway-protesting bill, Minnesota lawmakers also proposed a separate piece of legislation that greatly increases penalties for nonviolent cases involving ‘obstructing the legal process.’ Under the bill’s language, nonviolent obstruction of authorities would carry ‘imprisonment of not less than 12 months’ and a fine of up to $10,000.”

4. IOWA

Where North Dakota legislators want to permit, in essence, vehicular homicide to curb the blockage of roadways, and Minnesota lawmakers seek to make such protests too costly, politicians in Iowa would rather throw demonstrators who block highways in jail for five years.

Senator Jake Chapman proposed Senate File 111 in response to an incident in November in which some 100 protesters blocked Interstate Highway 80 and brought eastbound traffic to a standstill for around 30 minutes — much to the consternation of drivers caught in the unexpected jam.

“Look, we have the right to protest. No one disputes that,” the lawmaker explained in defense of his controversial bill, which, incidentally, isn’t without opposition. “We encourage that. But there is an appropriate time and an appropriate place to do so. Interstates are not one of those places. That is what this bill does. It aims to stop that.”

As COO of Midwest Ambulance Service, Chapman claims to be concerned such spontaneous highway blockages obstruct access for emergency services, as well as free commerce and travel.

If passed, Chapman’s law “would apply to people blocking the travel portion of Iowa highways with speeds posted at 55 mph or higher. Violators could be charged with a Class D felony, which includes a sentence of prison time and a fine of at least $750 and up to $7,500,” the Des Moines Register reports.

5. INDIANA

In line with aforementioned proposals, Indiana State Senator Jim Tomes introduced the “Block Traffic and You Die” bill — or, at least, that’s how opponents are characterizing the Hoosier State’s anti-protest legislation.

Senate Bill 285 would require public officials to dispatch all available law enforcement to clear roadways — using “any means necessary” — if at least 10 protesters have attempted to obstruct traffic without first obtaining a permit.

Although indeed vague, it is the ‘any means necessary’ portion of Tomes’ proposed law that worries activists who have traditionally worked with police. Often officers will escort marchers in roadways, blocking cross traffic for them to pass, ensuring both protesters and drivers remain safe. Thus, opponents of the legislation find it frivolous and curiously worded — and far too open to interpretation.

And there are still more proposed laws restricting the constitutional right to protest.

6. COLORADO

“In Colorado,” the Intercept reports, “Republican state Sen. Jerry Sonnenberg has introduced a bill that would greatly increase penalties for environmental protesters. Under the proposed law, obstructing or tampering with oil and gas equipment would be reclassified from a misdemeanor to a ‘class 6’ felony, a category of crime that reportedly can be punished by up to 18 months behind bars and a fine of up to $100,000.”

7. WASHINGTON

Washington State Senator Doug Ericksen proposed creating a new crime to facilitate charging protesters with a felonies for blocking roads and other assorted activities — he hopes to deem them “economic terrorists.”

Ericksen seeks to allow felony prosecution “of those who intentionally break the law in an attempt to intimidate or coerce private citizens or the government by obstructing economic activity.” However, the broad brush language in his proposed legislation deeply concerns civil and constitutional rights advocates, like Doug Honig of the Washington ACLU, who noted in a statement quoted by Q13 FOX,

The statement throws out a lot of broad rhetoric, and we’ll need to see an actual bill.  But we’re already concerned that some of its loose terms  appear to be targeting  civil disobedience as ‘terrorism.’  That’s the kind of excessive approach to peaceful protest that our country and state do not need.

Let’s keep in mind that civil rights protesters who sat down at lunch counters could be seen as ‘disrupting business’ and ‘obstructing economic activity,’ and their courageous actions were opposed by segregationists as trying to ‘coerce business and government.’

Lawmakers in two states have taken a more unusual route to combat protests.

8. NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina Senator Dan Bishop wants to provide controversial Governor Pat McCrory — and incidentally any politician — an official safe space away from hecklers who might approach to, well, scream unpleasant words.

Bishop, reports the News & Observer, decided verbal criticism of politicians was worthy of legal protection after witnessing McCrory being followed and yelled at over inaugural weekend in Washington, D.C. Should the proposed legislation pass, it would thus be “a crime to threaten, intimidate, or retaliate against a present or former North Carolina official in the course of, or on account of, the performance of his or her duties.”

9. MICHIGAN

Rather than worrying about political or environmental protesters, Michigan lawmakers turned their attention to union workers with two proposed pieces of legislation aimed to sharply curtail the right to picket for grievances such as pay or safety conditions.

“One bill would increase fines against picketers to $1,000 per person per day of a picket and $10,000 per day for an organization or union involved in the picket that is deemed to be an illegal mass picket,” the Detroit Free Press reported last month.

“The other would repeal a law that requires employers to include information about an ongoing strike when they advertise to hire employees who will replace existing, but striking employees at a company.”

10. VIRGINIA

Only in Virginia did a lone lawmaker stand in opposition to their party’s proposed legislative crackdown on protest, as the Daily Press reports

Senate Bill 1055 would have increased penalties for failing to disperse when police declare an unlawful assembly, upping a misdemeanor that brings only a fine now to one with potential jail time. It was one of four bills on protest punishments filed this session by state Sen. Richard Stuart, R-Montross, and the last of the four to die.

* * *

All told, this collection of anti-protest legislation constitutes an overarching attempt to quash the right of the people to demonstrate when the government errs against them — and the result will only increase near unbearable police state conditions already choking out First Amendment protections in the United States.

With division at unprecedented levels over politics, police violence, and, really, any nameable issue, such extraneous laws can only be attempting one thing.

As Lee Rowland, a senior staff attorney at the American Civil Liberties Union, warned in a statement to the Intercept,

This trend of anti-protest legislation dressed up as ‘obstruction’ bills is deeply troubling. A law that would allow the state to charge a protester $10,000 for stepping in the wrong place, or encourage a driver to get away with manslaughter because the victim was protesting, is about one thing: chilling protest.

Read More at: ActivistPost.com

Claire Bernish writes for TheFreeThoughtProject.com, where this article first appeared.

Oakland ordinance could set strict rules on government surveillance

Source: RTAmerica
January 9, 2017

Oakland, California may become one of the first US cities to impose strict rules on how officials can acquire and deploy surveillance technology. The city’s transparency commission recently approved an ordinance that aims to increase transparency and accountability while protecting citizens’ civil liberties. RT America’s Brigida Santos joins Anya Parampil to discuss the development.

Police State: In Tampa, Food Not Bombs activists arrested for feeding the homeless—AGAIN

Two activists with Food Not Bombs are handcuffed after they defied police orders to stop feeding the homeless in a downtown Tampa public park.
Source: CLTampa.com
January 7, 2017

Temperatures were dipping into unfriendly territory Saturday afternoon as sports fans flocked to the events at Curtis Hixon Waterfront Park.

At nearby Lykes Gaslight Park, members of Tampa’s homeless community were gathered for hot coffee and bagels, courtesy of the group Food Not Bombs.

There were no altercations, no illicit substances, no bad behavior—unless you count that, according to the City of Tampa, that coffee and bagels were illegal.

Why?

Because you have to have a special permit in order to offer free food to the needy in city parks. But obtaining a city permit to feed the homeless twice a week—to set up a table and open bags of chips and bagels and spoon organic beans and rice from a pot—can be pricey because of the insurance policy the city requires.

Given how often they do it (homeless people have to eat frequently, too), that can add up.

Volunteers with Food Not Bombs knew their actions were technically illegal. They had been warned about it earlier in the week.

And they did it anyway.

A volunteer serves food as police linger nearby.A volunteer serves food as police linger nearby.Anthony MartinoAs a result, seven people were arrested. For feeding hungry people in a park.

Some were arrested still wearing the plastic gloves with which they served food.

When police arrived on the scene, they gave the activists three minutes to stop feeding those in need.

Then, they moved in, pulling the volunteers away as they continued to serve.

“Please help yourselves,” one could be heard saying to those still gathered as he was dragged off.

A man who reached for a last-minute bagel was also arrested. (Watch a video of the arrests, courtesy of Erin Sauer, below).

Anthony MartinoIn an email sent to press Saturday night, the group said it “has no plans to stop sharing food with the homeless and hungry and will continue to defy unjust laws that criminalize compassion and mutual aid.”

That includes a planned gathering Tuesday at 8 a.m. in the same location.

“We intend to expose the city’s cruelty in the face of thousands in our community who are struggling with issues of food insecurity, mental and medical health issues, poverty, and homelessness,” a spokesperson for the group said in an email. “If the city will not address these problems, the least they can do is not get in the way and stop others from addressing these needs. Compassion should never be criminalized.

This isn’t the first time activists with the group have been arrested for feeding the homeless, and Food Not Bombs isn’t the only group to have been arrested in Tampa for feeding the homeless. Also, Tampa is not the only city in Florida in which it’s illegal to feed the homeless without proper paperwork.

In Tampa, the group…

Continue Reading At: CLTampa.com

Police State Special: Walking your children home from school and driving while caffeinated are now felony crimes in police state America

Image: Walking your children home from school and driving while caffeinated are now felony crimes in police state America
Source: NaturalNews.com
Mike Adams
December 30, 2016

In Magnolia, Texas, it is now a felony crime to walk your own children home from school. Er, I mean the “government indoctrination center.” Seriously, parents can now be charged with serious crimes for merely meeting their children at the school and walking them home.

“The principal has decided that no matter how close the student lives to the school, the student must either take the bus, or the parent must wait in a long car pickup line,” reports Fox 26 in Houston.

“Try to walk your student off the campus and you could face criminal charges… Fox26 knows of 2 other parents who were just threatened with arrest.”

This is yet more evidence that even in Texas, the government thinks it owns your children. Parental rights are being obliterated across the country at a breathtaking pace, including in California where the state can now mandate government injections of your children with aluminum, mercury and other toxic substances that cause autism and neurological disorders.

The same government that has mandated these “immunizations” has also granted blanket legal immunity to the vaccine industry, so if a mandated vaccine harms your child, it’s now your problem to deal with and you can’t sue the manufacturer for its defective, harmful product. In effect, the government can force you to harm your child, then deny you due process in seeking compensation for damage to your child.

Man charged with DUI for driving under the influence of caffeine

Meanwhile in California, a man was arrested and charged with a DUI for driving while under the influence of caffeine. “38-year-old Joseph Schwab has been fighting a DUI for over a year, despite the fact that he was not under the influence of any illegal drugs at the time, he did, however, test positive for caffeine,” reports The Free Thought Project.

“[The officer] arrested him and took him to jail so his blood could be drawn for other drugs. His blood tests came back negative for all illegal drugs. But he did test positive for caffeine. For some reason, this was enough to charge Schwab with a DUI.”

In doing this, California’s incredibly stupid police state bureaucrats are setting a precedent that could get you charged with a felony crime for drinking Starbucks or Pepsi while behind the wheel.

Indeed, California can now raise all sorts of money to fund its illegal alien benefits programs by arresting and charging coffee drinkers with DUIs, generating huge cash flow revenues for the insane police state known better as “Collapsifornia.” (Much of the “justice system” in California is really just revenue generation.)

Solano County DA morons finally drop DUI charges after 16 months, admitting zero evidence

Now, after 16 months of threatening this 36-year-old driver with felony charges, the libtardocrats of Solano County have admitted they have no evidence of anything and must therefore drop the charges.

In their own twisted words, they still imply the driver was on some sort of drugs, but claim they couldn’t find them even after administering a forced blood test:

“After further consideration, without a confirmatory test of the specific drug in the defendant’s system that impaired his ability to drive, we do not believe we can prove the charge beyond a reasonable doubt,” says the county press release.

District Attorney Krishna Abrams typifies the kind of tyrannical bureaucrats you find throughout the California “injustice” system. They don’t care whether there’s any evidence at all. You’re “guilty” just because they want to get you (and the state has granted them exceptional powers to destroy the lives of innocent people).

I’ve seen other California DAs ruin the lives of completely innocent people, in Ventura County and LA County in particular. There’s no question that California has the most corrupt bunch of DAs in the entire country, and they all act like salivating tyrants who seethe with anger toward anyone who refuses to bow to their power. They are far more interested in prosecuting independent-minded people than criminal-minded people, it turns out.

“What this case illustrates is the arbitrary nature of the state to use any reason possible to find a person guilty,” writes John Vibes at TFTP. “The police state has claimed a right to search your most private property — your own blood. And, whatever they find inside it — can and will be used against you in a court of law.”
Continue Reading at: NaturalNews.com

Dozens of Miami cops caught not uploading bodycam footage

Source: RTAmerica
December 18, 2016

Despite receiving a $960,000 grant from the Department of Justice to equip all its officers with body cameras, dozens of Miami police officers are refusing to use the technology. Sixty-three Miami police officers were found to have not uploaded a single hour of footage during a two-week period that was investigated by a police watchdog group. RT correspondent Marina Portnaya has the report.