Benefits of Marjoram for Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)

Source: NutritionFacts.org
Dr. Greger
February 17, 2017

DESCRIPTION: Even a small amount of fresh herbs can double or even quadruple the antioxidant power of a meal. The ability of oregano to decrease chromosomal damage from radiation and marjoram to affect hormone levels in women with PCOS is put to the test.

1 Hour Gluten Free Bread Recipe

Source: Guildbrook Farm | Simple Sustainable Living
February 15, 2017

Is it possible to make homemade gluten free bread in 1 hour? Jaime shows you the recipe she uses every week for gluten free bread, how she stores it, and what she does with the leftovers.

1 Hour Gluten Free Bread Recipe:
1.75 cups gluten free flour blend (see flour video for recipe or use your own blend)
1.75 cups ground gluten free oatmeal
1 egg
4-5 Tbsp butter or lard (or combo)
0.75 Tbsp Xanthan Gum (optional)
0.75 Tbsp baking powder
1.5 tsp salt
1 tsp apple cider vinegar

For the Yeast:
1-1.25 cups warm water (110 degrees F)
1.5 Tbsp active dry yeast
1 Tbsp sugar (or honey)

Mix yeast ingredients in a bowl and allow yeast to rise. Blend all bread ingredients in a food processor. Add yeast mixture and blend until just incorporated (do not over-blend). Bread should be the consistency of thick cake batter. Add more water or flour as needed. Pour into greased cast iron pan and set in warm oven (100 degrees F) until batter has risen to top of pan. Once risen, turn heat up to 350 degrees and bake for 50 minutes or until internal temperature reaches 180-190 degrees. Remove from oven and remove from pan to cool.

*Note if pan is too full it will rise over the top. If this happens, just clean up edges and continue baking.

Lodge Cast Iron Bread Pan on Amazon: http://amzn.to/2kv0X1H
Xanthan Gum on Amazon: http://amzn.to/2kHPv3r
Organic Beeswax on Amazon: http://amzn.to/2lj4zIa

If you have some tips or a video on how to make gluten free bread, please be sure to leave a comment or link below. We encourage community and want to provide access to a variety of information so viewers can make their own informed decisions about the topics we cover.

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Colorado farmers go organic to meet growing demand

Image: Colorado farmers go organic to meet growing demand
Source: NaturalNews.com
Amy Goodrich
February 14, 2017

While big agricultural corporations are trying to find ways to fill their pockets with profits from pesticide-laden food, Colorado farmers are working hard to make the transition to less profitable organic farming methods to protect our health and meet the rising demand for clean, organic food.

While the need for organic food is growing fast, organic food sales still account for a relatively small share of the total U.S. food market. Since 2000, organic food sales have exhibited a yearly double-digit growth, providing opportunities for U.S. organic farmers to enter high-value markets in the United States and other countries.

According to an annual survey of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Colorado’s organic agricultural industry has more than doubled in sales in the past three years. In an email to The Denver Post, Tom Lipetzky, the director of marketing programs and strategic initiatives at the ‎Colorado Department of Agriculture, said that today’s consumers are more and more engaged in their food purchases. Not only do they want to know where their food is coming from, but they also want to know how it was produced. (RELATED: read more about clean, organic foods at Ingredients.news.)

Organic farmland in Colorado covers more than 155,000 acres, with another 70,000 acres dedicated to organic pasture- and rangeland. While the transition to organic farming methods can be expensive, time-consuming, and almost always comes with a high amount of crop loss, this isn’t stopping many farmers from making the switch.

In 1907, the Hungenberg family started a farm on 7 acres, which has now grown to 4,000 acres. With the growing organic food trend, co-owner Jordan Hungenberg said they didn’t want to be left behind, so they decided to make the switch slowly. Last year they dedicated about 62 acres of their farmland to growing carrots using organic farming methods.

While they lost more than half of their crop during their first year and had to hire more people, Hungenberg noted that all in all it was a success. They even made a little money out of the harvest, and are now planning to triple their planting of organic carrots for next season.

The ‘certified organic’ sticker goes a long way

With the growing population of health-conscious people in mind, many farmers across Colorado see the potential long-term benefits they will get from making the switch. Becca Jablonski, an assistant professor and food systems extension economist at Colorado State University, said that farmers who sell their USDA “certified organic” produce to major supermarkets are on the right track to ensure financial success. Today’s consumers are more and more drawn to foods which bear the certified organic sticker to protect their families from the harmful effects of GMOs and pesticides.  (RELATED: Stay informed about the damaging effects of pesticides at Pesticides.news.)

Tim Ferrell, owner of Berry Patch Farms in Brighton, added that he has seen the positive effect the USDA “certified organic” sticker has on food sales. While also drawn to the premium sales prices of organic food, using organic farming methods has brought him peace of mind.

“We just do not feel comfortable using fertilizers that would infiltrate the water table,” he said.

Though many farmers complain about the higher cost, research into organic farming methods that reduce the cost and crop loss are booming. According to Kaylee Armstrong of Abundant Life Organic Farms in Hotchkiss, non-chemical products that can be used are becoming more and more available. She even said that they increased the prices of their organic foods to match those of conventional growers. However, this is not a benefit all organic farmers are experiencing just yet. Therefore, special programs exist to help farmers with the costs involved in transitioning to certified organic farming methods.

Colorado’s dry climate seems to be the perfect fit to grow organic crops. There is one thing in the organic evolution, however, that troubles Kaylee Armstrong: the introduction of large food corporations to the market.

“We don’t want to see them lobbying the government to make regulations lower,” she said, which could result in a lower quality of organic food. “We’ve already seen it in the egg industry,” she said.

Sources:

DenverPost.com

ERS.USDA.gov

USDA.MannLib.Cornell.edu[PDF]

Your Health – Your Future [Part 1 of 2] – A conversation with Robin Falkov

Source: ForumBorealis.net
February 14, 2017

Dr. Robin Falkov comes on and accounts for all matters health – everything from Health Freedom Rights to practical home remedy tips. Some of the questions discussed are: Nazi connections to Big Pharma? What is Codex Alimentarius? Health Cartels have sinister agenda beyond ruthless profits? Is GMO taking over? What health care system works? What’s the problem with Vaccines? Are there homeopathic Vaccines? The status of Complementary Medicine? What is healthy nutrition? What food substances to avoid? Why is local cultivation important? And many more issues big & small, like what sugar substitutes are safe & sound…

Can This Food Inhibit Cancer Growth?

Source: iHealthTube.com
February 8, 2017

In this week’s edition of natural news headlines, find out what common food may inhibit the growth of cancer cells. Also learn about how your gut health may have a connection to your blood pressure. And learn about an important connection between protein intake and heart health!

The Dirt: The Self Sustainable Diet

Source: Guildbrook Farm | Simple Sustainable Living
February 2, 2017

Vegan or Atkins? Macrobiotic or Gluten Free? Every year there is a new diet trend claiming to be the best way to lose weight or get healthier. Who is right? Jaime talks to you about health issues that plagued her from a young age, the extreme diets she went through to help with her issues, and how it wasn’t until she stopped following diet trends and started listening to her body that her health improved. After years of dieting, she finally settles on what she calls The Self Sustainable Diet, which has helped her to become the healthiest she has been in her life.

The Self Sustainable Diet
1) A permanent diet
2) Improves overall health and immunity
3) Can mostly be grown or raised on a farm or homestead

“Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food.”― Hippocrates

If you have some tips or a video on naturopathic diets, please be sure to leave a comment or link below. We encourage community and want to provide access to a variety of information so viewers can make their own informed decisions about the topics we cover.

Be sure to subscribe, we have a lot of videos coming out on homesteading, simple living, prepping, food storage, and healthy recipes. Follow us on our journey to become more self-reliant.

Thanks for watching!

Jaime and Jeremy