Dr. Mercola and Dr. Shanahan on Dietary Fats

Source: Mercola.com
Dr. Mercola | Dr. Cate Shanahan
June 21, 2017

Dr. Joseph Mercola, natural health expert and Mercola.com founder and Dr. Cate Shanahan, a family physician and author of “Deep Nutrition: Why Your Genes Need Traditional Food,” talk about good and bad fats. To know more, watch this video or visit Mercola.com.

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7 Reasons to Get More Magnesium

Magnesium
Source: GreenMedInfo.com
Margie King, Health Coach
June 11, 2017

Magnesium is the fourth most abundant mineral in your body, and is the reason why vegetables are green.  But few people fully appreciate the importance of this miraculous mineral. 

The human genome project reveals that 3,751 human proteins have binding sites for magnesium.[i]  And so far we know this one essential mineral activates over 350 biochemical processes in the body to keep things flowing.

Plants are green because they contain the light-harvesting molecule chlorophyll which bears a striking resemblance to human hemoglobin (with the difference that the latter contains an oxygen-binding iron atom and not magnesium).

Here are just seven good reasons to get more magnesium-rich foods in your diet today.

1. Prevent Migraines.

According to University of Vermont Professor of Neurology and migraine expert Robert Shapiro, M.D., Ph.D., every year nearly one in five Americans experience some form of migraine attack.  One in 25 will have headaches lasting at least 15 days per month. These disabling attacks include severe one-sided, throbbing headaches, and sensitivity to light and sound.  They may also involve nasal congestion, cloudy thinking, and nausea.

In one study of 133 migraine patients, supplementing with 500 mg of magnesium oxide for just 12 weeks significantly improved the frequency and severity of migraines.[ii]

And a double blind, placebo controlled study from Kaiser Permanente showed that supplementing with magnesium significantly cut the number of days children suffered with a migraine.[iii]

2. Lower Heart Disease Mortality.  

A study in the journal Atherosclerosis found that people with low magnesium levels were more than twice as likely to die of heart disease.  They were also more than seven times as likely to die from all causes.[iv]

3. Manage Diabetes

Magnesium deficiency is common among type 2 diabetics, especially those with neuropathy or coronary disease.[v]  A Harvard study found that diabetics taking 320 mg of magnesium for up to 16 weeks significantly improved their fasting blood sugar levels as well as their HDL (good) cholesterol.[vi]

4. Relieve Symptoms of Fibromyalgia.

A double blind, placebo controlled study from the University of Texas showed that magnesium malate improves pain and tenderness in fibromyalgia patients.[vii]

5. Lower Risk of Colon Cancer.

Epidemiologic studies link low magnesium levels with higher rates of colorectal cancer.  And a meta-analysis from China confirms that higher magnesium intakes are associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer and especially colon cancer.

The Chinese researchers analyzed eight prospective studies covering 338,979 participants. Their results, published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, found the highest average intake of magnesium was associated with an 11% reduction in colorectal cancer risk compared to the lowest average intake.

In addition, for every 50 mg per day increase in magnesium, colon cancer was reduced by 7%.

An earlier meta-analysis by Imperial College London and Wageningen University found that for every 100 mg increase in magnesium, colorectal cancer decreased by 13%.

6. Build Strong Bones.

Studies find a significant association between bone density and magnesium levels.[viii]  But magnesium content of bones decreases with age.[ix]  In addition, sugar and alcohol cause magnesium to be lost through the urine.

Magnesium assists calcium in building bone strength,[x] but it does much more.  It stimulates the hormone calcitonin.  That helps draw calcium out of the blood and soft tissues and put it back into the bones. Too much calcium in the blood and tissues can increase the risk of arthritis, heart attack, and kidney stones, as well as osteoporosis.[xi]

And getting more magnesium may mean you need less than the government’s recommended 1,200 mg of calcium per day.  One study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that increasing magnesium while lowering calcium to 500 mg per day was enough to increase bone density.[xii]

7. Reduce Signs of Metabolic Syndrome

Mexican researchers looked at the effects of taking oral magnesium supplements on people they categorized as “metabolically obese, normal-weight (MONW) individuals.”

MONW individuals have a body mass index under 25 which is considered normal weight.  But they also have hyperinsulinemia and or insulin resistance.  And they have high triglycerides and high blood pressure.  As a result, these individuals are at higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

The researchers studied 47 MONW individuals who had low magnesium levels.  In a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial one group received a daily solution of 30 ml of magnesium (equivalent to 382 mg).  The control group received 30 ml of a placebo solution.

Their results were published in the Archives of Medical Research.  After only 4 months, markers of metabolic syndrome were significantly lower in the magnesium group.  They lowered their systolic pressure by 2.1 points and their diastolic pressure by 3.8 points.  Their fasting blood glucose levels dropped 12.3 points and their triglycerides plunged 47.4%.

Magnesium is also known to:

Symptoms of magnesium deficiency include constipation and other digestive problems, low energy, and irregularities in menstrual flow and reproductive health, and migraine headaches.

Magnesium also relaxes the body from tightness, tension, tics, spasms, cramps and stiffness.  And it helps prevent the buildup of plaque on your teeth, in your heart and arteries, and even in your brain.

The recommended daily allowance for magnesium is 420 mg for men or 320 mg for women.  But it’s estimated that between 80% and 90% of Americans are magnesium deficient.  One government study showed that 68% of American women do not consume the recommended daily amount of magnesium.  Almost 20% don’t even get half of the recommended amount.[xiii]

In addition, the use of oral contraceptives, diuretics, and laxa­tives can make magnesium deficiencies worse.

Magnesium deficiency is relatively easy to remedy with food.  One of the richest sources of magnesium is high quality chocolate. Dark chocolate has a whopping 176 mg of magnesium in a 3.5 ounce bar.  In fact, if you crave chocolate your body may be telling you it’s low in magnesium.

Other high magnesium foods include:

  • Dried seaweeds
  • Dark leafy greens (especially collards, spinach and Swiss chard)
  • Broccoli
  • Beans
  • Whole grains (especially millet, brown rice and quinoa)
  • Almonds, cashews, and filberts
  • Sesame seeds
  • Lentils
  • Avocados
  • Wheatgrass
  • Spirulina ​and chlorella​​

Magnesium supplements are also widely available. They come in many forms including oxide, citrate, carbonate, aspartate, and lactate.  Magnesium oxide is the least expensive but also the most difficult for the body to absorb.  Magnesium citrate helps with constipation.  Magnesium glycinate is a better choice if you don’t want the laxative effect.

Some people have difficulty absorbing magnesium in an oral supplement form.  If you eat a high fiber diet, for example, your body doesn’t absorb as much magnesium.  Also, taking diuretics, antibiotics or proton pump inhibitors for acid reflux all interfere with magnesium absorption.

For better absorption, try magnesium chloride, or a form known as iMCH, which can be applied topically.  It has been called the most effective form of magnesium for cellular detoxification and tissue purification.  It comes in the form of oil.  You can spray this directly on your skin or even soak your feet in it.  The liquid magnesium bypasses the intestines and is absorbed directly into the tissues of the body.

Visit GreenMedInfo’s page on magnesium documenting well over 100 health benefits of magnesium. Also, check out their cutting edge report on how chlorophyll (what makes veggies green!) can help your body to capture the energy of sunlight, with positive consequences to your health and well being.

Read More At: GreenMedInfo.com

________________________________________________________________________

Sources:

https://www.consumerlab.com/reviews/magnesium-supplement-review/magnesium/

http://www.healthcentral.com/medications/r/medications/magnesium-chloride-oral-10702

http://www.ancient-mineral s.com/products/


[i] Damiano Piovesan, Giuseppe Profiti, Pier Luigi Martelli, Rita Casadio. 3,751 magnesium binding sites have been detected on human proteins. BMC Bioinformatics. 2012 ;13 Suppl 14:S10. Epub 2012 Sep 7. PMID: 23095498

[ii] Ali Tarighat Esfanjani, Reza Mahdavi, Mehrangiz Ebrahimi Mameghani, Mahnaz Talebi, Zeinab Nikniaz, Abdolrasool Safaiyan. The effects of magnesium, L-carnitine, and concurrent magnesium-L-carnitine supplementation in migraine prophylaxis. Biol Trace Elem Res. 2012 Dec ;150(1-3):42-8. Epub 2012 Aug 17. PMID: 22895810

[iii] Fong Wang, Stephen K Van Den Eeden, Lynn M Ackerson, Susan E Salk, Robyn H Reince, Ronald J Elin. Oral magnesium oxide prophylaxis of frequent migrainous headache in children: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Eur J Endocrinol. 2009 Apr;160(4):611-7. Epub 2009 Jan 29. PMID: 12786918

[iv] Thorsten Reffelmann, Till Ittermann, Marcus Dörr, Henry Völzke, Markus Reinthaler, Astrid Petersmann, Stephan B Felix. Low serum magnesium concentrations predict cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. Atherosclerosis. 2011 Jun 12. Epub 2011 Jun 12. PMID: 21703623

[v] M de Lordes Lima, T Cruz, J C Pousada, L E Rodrigues, K Barbosa, V Canguçu. The effect of magnesium supplementation in increasing doses on the control of type 2 diabetes. Diabetes Care. 1998 May;21(5):682-6. PMID: 9589224

[vi] Y Song, K He, E B Levitan, J E Manson, S Liu. Effects of oral magnesium supplementation on glycaemic control in Type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis of randomized double-blind controlled trials. Cardiovasc Toxicol. 2008;8(3):115-25. Epub 2008 Jul 8. PMID: 16978367

[vii] I J Russell, J E Michalek, J D Flechas, G E Abraham. Treatment of fibromyalgia syndrome with Super Malic: a randomized, double blind, placebo controlled, crossover pilot study. J Rheumatol. 1995 May;22(5):953-8. PMID: 8587088

[viii] Ryder KM et al, Magnesium intake from food and supplements is associated with bone mineral density in healthy older white subjects.  J Am Geriatr Soc. 2005 Nov;53(11):1875-80. Pubmed 16274367

[ix] Jahnen-Dechent W., Ketteler M. “Magnesium basics.” Clin. Kidney J. 2012;5:i3–i14. doi: 10.1093/ndtplus/sfr163. [Cross Ref]

[x] Jones, G., M. Riley, and T. Dwyer, Maternal Diet during pregnancy is associated with bone mineral density in children: a longitudinal study. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2000. 54: p. 749-756

[xi] Zofková I, , Kancheva RL. The relationship between magnesium and calciotropic hormones. Magnes Res. 1995 Mar; 8 (1): 77-84. Pubmed 7669510

[xii] Nieves, J.W. 2005. Osteoporosis: The role of micronutrientsAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition 81 (5): 1232S-1239S. http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/81/5/1232S.abstract

[xiii] King DE, Mainous AG 3rd, Geesey ME, Woolson RF. “Dietary magnesium and C-reactive protein levels.” J Am Coll Nutr. 2005 Jun 24(3):166-71.

Monsanto shill proclaims “there is no ‘right to know’ if a food is Genetically Modified [GMO] considering that GMOs are practically impossible to define”

Image: Monsanto shill proclaims “there is no ‘right to know’ if a food is GMO considering that GMOs are practically impossible to define”
Source: NaturalNews.com
Isabelle Z
June 16, 2017

Life is full of frustrations, from rush hour traffic to overly complex tax codes. However, if you’re Forbes contributor Kavin Senapathy, even the mere act of going to the grocery store is torture. It’s not the bad music they play or a shortage of cashiers that makes this mundane task so annoying for her – it’s Non-GMO Project Verified Labels.

Yes, you read that correctly: This woman claims these Non-GMO labels are “ruining” her shopping experience. They are just a few words slapped onto food packaging with an image of an unassuming-looking butterfly, yet somehow they are turning her trips to the supermarket into an unbearable undertaking.

What’s even more outrageous, this easily frustrated individual says that people do not have a “right to know” if food is GMO because she feels that GMOs are essentially “impossible to define.” She also says these labels don’t tell us anything meaningful. That’s funny; GMOs are a huge topic of debate throughout the world and everyone on both sides seems to know exactly what people are referring to when they use the term.

She might not want to know if her food contains GMOs, but plenty of other people certainly do. Why else would 3,000 brands go to the trouble of having 43,000 products verified by them? Granted, the label is not quite the same as an organic certification, but it does give peace of mind that a company has avoided GMOs in all aspects of food production. It doesn’t consider whether or not a product was exposed to chemical fertilizers or other synthetic substances like the USDA organic label does, but it’s still a good mark to look out for when deciding between two products that otherwise appear to be similar.

We don’t have a right to know?

Consumers do indeed have a right to know what the products they are buying contain. If you don’t care whether you consume GMOs or not, that’s your right. In that case, don’t look for the label, buy whatever you want, go home and eat it and roll the dice with your health. There is no reason to get worked up over a label on packaging – unless, of course, you are being paid to make a point about it.

She’s taking this really hard for someone who ostensibly has no vested interest in the matter. A quick scroll through some of the author’s past articles for Forbes, however, brings up an interesting and wholly unsurprising trend: She’s quite fond of defending Monsanto.

One of her articles, “Monsanto Found Guilty in Fake Trial that Distracted from Real Problems”, calls the firm a “symbolic scapegoat.” Another piece, “The Anti-Vaccine and Anti-GMO Movements Are Inextricably Linked and Cause Preventable Suffering” tries to cast people who are against dangerous practices like eating food doused in carcinogenic herbicides in a negative light. She also wrote an article telling America to “break up with Dr. Oz,” a vocal GMO critic with a huge television audience.

More Monsanto propaganda

What do all of these pieces have in common? Senapathy’s articles all read like pro-GMO propaganda. In fact, it’s not out of the question that Monsanto itself penned the pieces, as we found out is common practice at the world’s most-hated firm. Internal emails released in a court case showed that staffers hire ghost writers to craft stories inaccurately portraying its products as safe and then pay scientists to sign off on them.

They also have a team of trolls who are paid to find any negative mentions of their products online and post some fake science in their defense. Therefore, it would not be surprising at all if they were enlisting writers like Senapathy to promote their business by discouraging people from seeking such labels.

Of course, none of this should come as any surprise from Forbes, a publication that published attack pieces by unethical individuals like PR operative Jon Entine against researchers who have the audacity to try to warn the public about GMO dangers. We see you, Forbes, and we know what you’re trying to do.

Read More At: NaturalNews.com

Sources:

NaturalNews.com

NonGMOProject.org

How Food Can Prevent Disease with Dr. Joel Fuhrman Spring Garden Tour

Source: GrowingYourGreens
June 13, 2017

John from http://www.growingyourgreens.com/ has a special guest, Dr. Joel Fuhrman, MD visit his garden for a special spring garden tour. In this episode, John will share with Dr. Fuhrman some of the special fruits, vegetables, and herbs he is growing. You will learn from Dr. Fuhrman why some of the vegetables that John is growing are non-optional plants you need to eat on a regular basis to prevent and reverse disease. You will discover the specific pathways in the body that require certain phytonutrients in these plant foods that prevent and reverse disease and can help keep you young and healthy. John will offer Dr. Fuhrman taste samples of many of the unique leafy greens, herbs, fruits, and vegetables growing in his garden so you can learn what a hard-core vegetable eater thinks about some of the unique varieties that John is growing. You will learn from both Dr. Fuhrman and John as they interact with each other in this educational, fun and inspiring one-of-a-kind spring backyard vegetable garden tour. After watching this episode, you will learn more about why some of the vegetables you are growing in your garden should be grown and eaten on a regular basis and in sufficient quantities. You will also discover many new varieties of edible plants that you may want to start growing. Joel Fuhrman, M.D. is a board-certified family physician, six-time New York Times best-selling author and internationally recognized expert on nutrition and natural healing, who specializes in preventing and reversing disease through nutritional methods. Dr. Fuhrman coined the term “Nutritarian” to describe his eating style, which is built around a diet of nutrient-dense, plant-rich foods.

Avoid These Drinks to Help Prevent Brain Shrinkage, Dementia, and Strokes


Source: NaturalSociety.com
Julie Fidler
May 26, 2017

One of the keys to keeping your brain nice and plump and in proper working order is avoiding soda – and not just the sugar-sweetened kind, either. Drinking sodas, whether regular or diet, is bad for brain health, 2 recent studies show. [1]

One study showed that people who drank diet soda every day were three times more likely to have a stroke or develop dementia over 10 years compared with those who didn’t consume any diet soda.

The second study showed that people who drank at least one diet soda daily had smaller brain volumes than people who didn’t drink any diet soda. The same study found that people who consumed more than two sugary beverages a day, such as soda or fruit juice, had smaller brain volumes and worse memory function compared with non-sugary beverage drinkers.

Study #1

For the first study, researchers interviewed about 43,000 people, age 45 and older, three times over seven years, and asked them whether they drank any diet or sugar-sweetened beverages. Toward the end of the study, the researchers started tracking the participants’ health for cases of stroke and dementia. This monitoring continued for 10 years.

During the monitoring period, 97 people had a stroke, and 81 developed dementia. Sixty-three of the 81 had dementia consistent with Alzheimer’s disease.

Read: How Diet Sodas Mess with Your Brain (video)

The scientists concluded that diet beverage consumption – but not sugary drink consumption – was associated with a higher risk of stroke and dementia over a 10-year period.

It’s not clear why; however, diet drinks have been linked in past studies to obesity and diabetes, which might also be linked with poor blood circulation. Circulation problems may increase a person’s risk of stroke or dementia because a constant flow of blood is necessary for proper brain functioning.

Source: The Washington Post

Study #2

In the second study, researchers looked at brain scans and results of cognitive tests conducted on about 4,000 people. Participants self-reported whether they drank any diet or sugary beverages, and if so, how much.

Researchers uncovered a link between the consumption of both sugary and diet drinks and smaller brain volumes. An additional link between the consumption of sugary beverages and poorer memory was found. All are considered risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease, according to the researchers.

The team controlled for cholesterol, smoking, diabetes, blood pressure, and various other health and behavioral factors. [2]

As in the first study, the mechanisms behind the decline in brain volume and memory may be tied to poor circulation, as previous research has linked high sugar intake with diabetes and high blood pressure. Both conditions are linked to compromised blood circulation that may negatively affect brain health. [1]

Lead author Matthew P. Pase, a senior research fellow at Boston University, says of the results of the second study:

“Although we can’t prove cause and effect, these data suggest that we should be cautious about drinking sugary beverages. They’re empty calories that contribute to weight gain and metabolic disease.” [2]

Read More At: NaturalSociety.com

Sources:

[1] Live Science

[2] The New York Times

Is This Food a Cancer Killer?

Source: iHealthTube.com
May 17, 2017

New research is indicating a common food might help the fight of one of the world’s most common cancers. Also learn about ways you can help prevent the most common form of arthritis and find out how you can also help cut the duration of the common cold!

Organic farming explodes 13%… Biggest growth since 2008

Image: Organic farming explodes 13%… Biggest growth since 2008
Source: NaturalNews.com
Rhonda Johansson
March 12, 2017

Good news for all local farmers! The latest United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) survey reveals that there are now 24,650 certified organic operations in the U.S. This is a 13 percent increase from 2016 and the highest growth rate we’ve seen since 2008. The number of local, organic farms has been steadily increasing — albeit haphazardly — since 2002. However, it is only this year where a steady and distinctive rise is seen. The National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition wrote on their website that “organic agriculture is one of the fastest growing sectors…for farmers across the country, strong demand for organic food translates into new and growing market opportunities.”

USDA organic certification provides farms or processing facilities the right and access to sell, label, and represent their products as organic in the United States. It is of particular importance for farms across rural America, where local industries contribute much to the area’s economic growth. As consumer demand for organic products grows, so too do sales. The USDA reported that there was approximately $43 billion in U.S. sales of organic products in 2015. Local farmers have said that being certified as organic by the USDA allows them to receive premium prices for their products.

The USDA ends their report quite succinctly; offering no justification as to why the rise is suddenly so sharp or relevant. Regardless, the growth is being lauded by many health advocates who believe in integrating into a cleaner, greener, and more organic lifestyle. The perils of pesticide-laden food, toxic tap water, and similar environmental concerns make it more necessary for people to be diligent about what they eat, what they do, and most importantly, how they live. Opting for organic food is an advantageous choice not only for your own personal health, but for the planet as well. There are several other reasons to choose organic foods, as listed on Prevention.com:

  1. Free from chemicals – Perhaps the most important consideration, eating organically-grown food is an assurance that you are not inadvertently consuming chemical poisons. In the article, it states that around 600 active chemicals are registered for use in America, roughly translating to around 16 pounds of chemical pesticides per person each year. Moreover, the National Academy of Sciences claims that 90 percent of chemicals applied on food have not been tested for long-term effects. The FDA only tests one percent of food for pesticide residue.
  2. Free from “watered-down” bogus nutrition – Organically-grown food contains more essential vitamins, minerals, and micronutrients compared to their commercially-grown siblings. A study published in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine concluded that organic food crops are grown in soil that is better-managed and less laden with chemicals. Consequently, the produce is significantly more nutrient-dense.
  3. Free from risk – More than 90 percent of the pesticides we consume are from meat and dairy products. The EPA says that because animals are further up the food chain, chemicals accumulate in their tissues. Hormones, antibiotics, and drugs are directly passed into these food sources as well. U.S. farmers use sex or growth hormones to aid in the development of their livestock. However, these artificial enhancers cannot be broken down, even at high temperatures. We then eat these products, unknowingly consuming the same toxins.

One other benefit of organic local farming is that it protects the environment. The foundation of all local farming is one of eco-sustenance. Preservation of soil and crop rotation keep farmlands healthy. Moreover, the natural ecosystem, wherein natural flora and animal life is allowed to thrive, is balanced.

While there are no official forecasts on the trend, it is hoped that more local farms going organic will be seen spreading across our nation. Follow more news about organics at Organics.news.

Read More At: NaturalNes.com

Sources include:

AGWeb.com

SustainableAgriculture.net

AMS.USDA.gov

Prevention.com