UFOs, Tesla, DeLonge, ETs, covert ops

TruthFact
Source: NoMoreFakeNews.com
Jon Rappoport
January 8, 2018

“I have harnessed the cosmic rays and caused them to operate a motive device.” — Nikola Tesla, Brooklyn Eagle (10 July 1931)

This is a “what if” story. But it’s also based on decades of experience analyzing propaganda and cover stories.

It’s based on the knowledge that military and intelligence operatives are trained to lie, and they like to lie, and they get up in the morning, licking their chops, because they know they’re going to lie during another day in paradise.

Is Tesla and his breakthrough science the hidden element in UFO research? Is he being buried under a welter of cover stories? In any event, cover stories ARE being floated in great numbers.

Nikola Tesla and other outlier scientists were researching anti-gravity in the 20th century. Upon his death, Tesla’s research papers were stolen by the government and never released.

What has the US government been doing at secret research facilities since World War 2— such as the famed Lockheed Skunkworks in Palmdale, California—and whose technology have they been using?

Have they been advancing Tesla’s (and other outlier scientists’) work? They would certainly try.

Would this US research be pointed toward building military craft capable of extraordinary speeds and maneuverability? Certainly.

Could this technology, at the root, have other applications—such as new modes of energy production that would eliminate the need for an oil economy? Possibly.

That would be a key reason for secrecy. Absolute secrecy.

If secrecy was the goal, extensive cover stories would have been developed and pushed—to this day.

And what better way to disseminate those stories than through government insiders, who feed information to UFO spokespeople?

“The UFOs are ET alien.”

I’m not saying this notion must be entirely false—I’m saying it can be USED to bury the root truth.

If secret technological advances—from science and scientists here on Earth—in the areas of energy, transportation, and space travel—would a cause a revolution in society—because a vast abundance of energy would be available for all—how would this fact be managed by oligarchs who rule through scarcity, war, and destruction?

One: float the story that advanced tech comes from ETs.

Two: wrap the ET story up in speculative fairy-tale mythologies, thus creating an occasion for scorn and mockery.

Three: via guilt by association, reject the entire idea that advanced secret technology exists, because it is married to comic book tales of ETs.

Note: the above step-operation works, whether or not ETs exist and have visited Earth.

Read this:

“For example, a new concept of spacecraft and aerospace flight arises from the possibility of the electromagnetic control of the gravitational mass. The novel spacecraft called Gravitational Spacecraft possibly will change the paradigm of space flight and transportation in general. Here, its operation principles and flight possibilities…will be described. Also it will be shown that other devices based on gravity control, such as the Gravitational Motor and the Quantum Transceivers, can be used in the spacecraft, respectively, for Energy Generation and Telecommunications.” (“The Gravitational Spacecraft” (full paper), Fran De Aquino, Maranhao State University, Brazil, December 3, 2013, from the Electric Space Craft Journal 27)

I’m not asserting these statements are true. I’m merely illustrating one of hundreds of articles and papers that have appeared on the subject of advanced technologies outside the realm of conventional science.

Since the beginning of the 20th century, and even earlier, researchers have been studying and writing about such technologies. It would be a mistake to think that military tech centers have blithely ignored this body of literature.

As they deride it, they examine it, and they use what they can.

In secret.

In secret, because they want to protect what they learn from their military enemies. And also because technology which could crack too many barriers and overturn the control of society must be kept in darkness.

Tesla, 1892: “Throughout space there is energy. Is this energy static or kinetic! If static our hopes are in vain; if kinetic — and this we know it is, for certain — then it is a mere question of time when men will succeed in attaching their machinery to the very wheelwork of nature.”

Suppose there are two entire bodies of scientific research: the one we know about, which is displayed in published studies, media articles, and press releases from governments and corporations; and a second body, which is separate and secret and more advanced, conducted in government and corporate facilities shielded from view. This would create a significant problem. How is the second body protected and denied?

That problem falls into the lap of disinformation specialists. A long-range program must be developed. It must contain many vectors.

Unidentified Flying Objects exist. Whatever their origin(s), they appear in the skies. They execute maneuvers at speeds that are “impossible.” Their actions prove that advanced technology exists.

Oops.

So, One, the UFOs need to be explained. And Two, they provide an occasion for disinformation.

Who will present that official disinfo? Why, officials, of course.

Where will they come from? The intelligence establishment. The military establishment. Because those departments and people “have been investigating the aerial phenomena.”

Over the years, these high-level officials will, while remaining in the shadows, pass along “secrets” to independent UFO researchers. The names of these military/intelligence officials will occasionally surface. Rumors about them will abound.

Every tidbit they offer to UFO researchers will be accepted and adored like a superior Christmas gift under the tree.

In no case will the leakers say, “We’ve developed astounding technology based on the work of Earth scientists, and we’re keeping this tech secret.”

Of all the leaks, that won’t be one of them.

Instead, the implication will be: we here on Earth couldn’t have developed such engineering capability. Out of the question.

Finally, in 2017, a whole group of elite ex-intelligence and military officials will step forward, together, as a “team” connected to a fledging Academy in the private sector. Its spokesman will be Tom DeLonge, a rock musician.

These ex-officials will confirm that remarkable UFOs exist, and the technology they exhibit surpasses anything known about on Earth.

Again, the engineering “could not have been developed by and from Earth scientists (working in secret).”

What does exist is “a highly exotic program to analyze off-planet UFOs.”

Over time, this latter assertion will be met with scorn. And mainstream journalists will wonder aloud about the Academy, the rock musician, and the bizarre gathering of ex-government officials around the musician.

Mainstream reporters will (as Daniel Liszt, the independent Dark Journalist has already pointed out) realize how strange it is, for example, that “recovered materials from UFOs” are being kept in a Las Vegas warehouse, under the control of billionaire, Robert Bigelow, instead of at the nearby Area 51 labs.

Other anomalies will surface. The whole UFO Disclosure episode will take on a woo-woo quality.

It’s called “blown cover as cover.” You admit secrets, thus appearing to blow your cover, but at the same time you’re hiding the deeper truth.

“Look, boys, we need to explain these UFOs whizzing around. We need to exclude ourselves as the primary secret engineers of these craft. So we paint ourselves as the somewhat befuddled and amazed recipients of technology from ET civilizations. That’s all we are. We’re trying to figure out what we’ve been handed on a silver platter. We don’t know what we’re doing. We’re children playing with adult machines. We’re, in a sense, victims. See? This plays into the whole op about humans as weak, incapable, and certainly unable to achieve genuinely heroic feats. Now, we’re not going to admit to the ET scenario out in the open. No. Officially, we don’t know anything about that. But we are going to give the green light to a few of our own guys to step forward and push the ET story. They’ll do it in a way that avoids any kind of blame directed at them or us. They’ll just throw up their hands and say the technology behind these UFOs is light years beyond anything that exists on Earth. They’ll say the universe is so big there must be other life out there. They’ll leave the rest to the imagination. And then, maybe, just maybe, they’ll say YES, these flying craft ARE ET, as if they can’t hold back the truth any longer, as if they’ve been painted into a corner and have to confess. At that point, the press will go after them. The press will call them fabulists and fakers and wild exaggerators. And once again (we’ve done this before), the house of cards will fall apart. The press and the government and the public will shake their heads and move away from the UFO story and advanced secret technology to other things…”

Consider this recent statement Tom DeLonge made about his new Academy:

“Hello, my name is Tom DeLonge from the Blink-182. I have brought together an elite team from CIA, DOD and the FMR Director of Advanced Programs at Lockheed Martin’s SkunkWorks. We are aiming to build this ElectroMagnetic Vehicle to Travel INSTANTANEOUSLY through Space, Air and Water BY ENGINEERING THE FABRIC OF SPACE-TIME. Our company is called To The Stars… and you can invest in our plan to revolutionize the world with technology that can change life as we know it.” [emphasis is mine]

How likely is it that these “elite team members” have gathered around DeLonge with confidence that he is the right person to disclose the truth about UFOs?

They certainly knew his views…

Read More At: NoMoreFakeNews.com

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A UFO Encounter For The Ages [Don’t worry, nothing happened, go back to sleep]

breakaway3
Source: NoMoreFakeNews.com
Jon Rappoport
January 2, 2017

(UFO archive, here)

In my work as a reporter over the past 35 years, I’ve studied how major media cover stories. One of their consistent blunders:

Failure to follow up.

But it isn’t really a blunder.

There is a boundary, and reporters aren’t allowed to cross it.

Therefore, it looks like these reporters are inherently stupid. They don’t ask the right questions. They back away from a story just when it becomes vital.

Well, many of them are stupid—but it’s often a trained response. Over time, they learn to act as if they’re clueless; and then, after years, they are.

What is this boundary? It’s the line beyond which “important people” would be damaged and exposed, if the reporter followed his instincts and pressed forward.

Important people, important institutions are like giants standing on slippery mud. Give them a push, and they fall. Start digging around in the mud, and they fall.

Official reality falls.

The underlying dictum of the press is: Official reality must never fall.

Here is a stunning example of a day when it did—a UFO encounter for the ages.

On March 18, 2001, Jeff Rense (rense.com) published an article by Frank Altomonte, headlined: “SIX ‘SAUCER-SHAPED’ UFOS AND FACE-TO-FACE ET CONTACT IN LA IN 1957.”

Altomonte dug up a November 6, 1957, article from the LA Times. Not just any article. Page one, under a huge black banner headline at the top of the page: MYSTERY AIR OBJECTS SEEN IN SKY OVER LA.

Read these 1957 quotes, and remember, this is the LA Times, the most important newspaper in Los Angeles, and one of the leading papers in the US—during a time when print journalism was still the main source of information for the public.

“They (USAF personnel) spotted six ‘saucer shaped flying objects’ at an altitude of about 7000 feet at the base of a cloud bank about 3:50 p.m.”

“Those unidentified flying objects first reported over Texas and Gulf of Mexico arrived over Southern California yesterday.”

“Personnel at Los Alamitos Naval Air Station reported unidentified objects in sight almost continuously between 6:05 and 7:25 p.m.”

“Lt. Richard Spencer, a flying officer, saw the object from the ground. ‘It was not a star and it was not an airplane’, he said. He admitted, however, that it appeared to be ‘starlike,’ and added that it glowed in varying colors, changing from bright to dim and back again.”

“Airport Tower Operator Louis D. Mitchell and a sentry on duty, Hospitalman Charles Kreiger, also observed the object. Almost all observers were agreed that the object moved slowly — almost imperceptibly, across the sky. Most were agreed that the direction of travel was north or northwest.”

“Lending credence to the reports was the fact that…Air Force weather observers, including the commanding officer of the unit, acknowledged sighting unidentified phenomena over Long Beach Municipal Airport.”

“They spotted six ‘saucer shaped flying objects’ at an altitude of about 7000 feet at the base of a cloud bank about 3:50 p.m.”

“Maj. Louis F. Baker, commanding officer of the weather observation post, who sighted the objects with his assistants Airmen Joseph Abramavage and William Nieland said: ‘They were circular and shiny like spun aluminum changing course instantaneously without loss of speed like planes in a dogfight,’ Maj. Baker said. He said the objects were larger than a twin engine C-46 aircraft and were in sight for about a minute and a half.”

“The objects also were observed by 10 military personnel waiting to board an airplane at the airport, the spotters reported. Maj. Baker said he rejected the theory that the objects were sheet ice in a cumulonimbus cloud because of their regular circular shape.”

“An electronics executive, Merlin G. Perkins, 1102 N. Wright St., Santa Ana, said he observed an object though binoculars for almost a half hour as it moved slowly overhead finally fading away into the reflected light above the Santa Ana business district. It appeared to be round and it winked slowly from dim to bright, with a reddish glow, Perkins said.”

The November 6, 1957, LA Times also ran a short piece from the Associated Press, dated a day earlier. AP is, of course, one of the two or three largest news wire services in the world.

“New Orleans, Nov 5 (AP) — The Coast Guard cutter Sebago sighted an unidentified flying object over the Gulf of Mexico at 5:21 a.m. today. The object, seen for about three seconds, resembled a brilliant planet moving at tremendous speed.”

There is much more to Altomonte’s article, but you’re getting the picture.

As far as the LA Times was concerned, back in 1957, what happened next? What did they do?

Nothing.

No follow-up.

One of the most significant events in modern times occurs over the skies of Los Angeles, with multiple professional observers (and private citizens also quoted), so you would assume an EXTENSIVE INVESTIGATION would be launched.

“OK, boys, this is when you earn your paychecks. You’re supposed to be relentless reporters. I’m your boss, and this is when I earn my paycheck, too. I’m setting you loose. I don’t care how long it takes. Find out what the hell this is. Break down doors. Go up against the Pentagon and the CIA. The Times will back you up. Is it people from another planet? Is it our own secret craft, with onboard technology no one has ever heard of? Is it Nazis, Russians? We’re going to chase this until the cows come home. And by cows, I mean you. Come home with the true story. We’re not going to let go. You’ll never cover another story like this in your lives…”

But no.

That didn’t happen.

The massive follow-up that should have launched from the Times, like rockets, was squelched.

Looking at the LA Times archives, for the day AFTER the boggling UFO story, I find two major headlines. The first is above the masthead: “Halimi beats Macias for Title.” The second: “Rocket Artillery Unveiled by Russ[ians].”

Here today, gone tomorrow.

Ten years later, many people in Los Angeles would barely remember the UFO encounter. Well, the LA Times hadn’t kept the story alive.

“Say Bob, do you recall that thing where a whole lot of UFOs flew over the city? Did it really happen? Maybe I just had a dream about it. Strange…”

And thus, official reality is preserved.

A hole ISN’T punched in the literal and figurative sky. Instead, citizens go about their business and their lives.

“Hi, I’m an amnesiac.”

“Me too.”

Collective reality is often maintained through omission. A shocking event occurs, an event which, if pursued and investigated, would change the course of history. The press is forced to cover the event…which then sinks below the waves. By design.

If you assembled, say, a hundred such shocking occurrences end to end, and you watched them bob in the water and then disappear from view, the residue—what is left over—would be official reality.

The event I cite most often in these pages occurred on July 26, 2000. That was the day the Journal of the American Medical Association, one of the most prestigious medical journals in the world, published a review by Dr. Barbara Starfield, a respected and revered public health expert at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health. The review was titled: “Is US Health Really the Best in the World?”

Dr. Starfield concluded that the US medical system kills 225,000 people a year. In a follow-up interview I did with her, she said this was a conservative estimate.

Extrapolate: Every decade, the US medical system (through FDA approved, correctly prescribed medicines, and mistreatment in hospitals) kills 2.25 MILLION Americans. Let that sink in.

When Dr. Starfield’s review was published…

Continue Reading At: JonRappoport.wordpress.com

UFO Disclosure: the insider game of “reliable sources”

FakeNews
NoMoreFakeNews.com
Jon Rappoport
January 2, 2018

(UFO archive, here)

In the current wave of UFO disclosures, the press (in particular, the New York Times) has decided to use Luis Elizondo, a career intelligence case officer, as its main source.

This choice reveals a time-honored strategy of elite news operations: cherry-pick who is reliable and who isn’t.

Of course, the press presents its case as flowing FROM the source. But that’s not true, because reporters and editors could have used other “reliable sources” to tell a different, or even contradictory, story.

Everything depends on who, at the moment, is pumped up and ushered on to center stage, and tagged as “reliable.”

I’m not saying Mr. Elizondo is telling lies from wall to wall. But, for example, where was the Times when reports began to emerge of UFOs appearing at a missile base in Montana (1967) and shutting down launch-capability? There were a number of professional military observers at the time. They could have been deemed “reliable sources,” but they weren’t. For decades, this event has been suppressed or downplayed by the mainstream press.

“Well, we did look into it, but we concluded there just wasn’t enough there. We didn’t go with the piece because the confirmation was thin.” That’s a frequent excuse. Often, it doesn’t hold water. It reflects an arbitrary decision to ignore a valid account.

This is how the game is played.

“Reliable source” can be managed, on a case by case basis.

“Let’s see. We can imply the steep rise in autism is the result of more careful monitoring of cases, or a genetic problem, or the rapid expansion of the CDC vaccination schedule. Let’s do a piece on genetics. Who can we tap for comments? Round up the usual list of expert sources and get quotes. ‘New research suggests a stronger link to genes than previously supposed.’ That’ll work…”

When I was writing my first book, AIDS INC., Scandal of the Century, in 1987, I decided to look into the widely promoted notion that HIV had spread to humans, in Africa, through contact with green monkeys. When the US press wants to promote a “new disease,” they inevitably go to far-off places around the globe for their “origin story.” The last time I looked, no new epidemic has ever begun in Brooklyn. I called a prominent AIDS researcher at Harvard. Without pause, he told me the green monkey theory had no evidence to support it. Well, obviously, the press hadn’t used him as a “reliable source.” They might use him to comment on other matters, but not this one—because “green monkey” was the preferred scenario for the moment.

On the UFO front, the Times could have jumped with both feet into Steven Greer’s Disclosure Project years ago (twitter). Greer had scores of military and intelligence officers who were testifying to all sorts of UFO contact. But back then, the story was verboten. So the sources were ignored.

Sometimes, the graduation from nonsense-story to breaking news isn’t the decision of a major press outlet. The newspaper or broadcast network takes its cue from a “higher authority.” The CIA or the Pentagon, for example. Or from an anonymous heavy hitter who will never be revealed. Depending on the topic of the story, the heavy hitter could exist within the core of the Bilderberg Group, the Trilateral Commission, the Vatican, the upper reaches of the “banking community” (a Rothschild front man), etc.

This is the “green light” phenomenon. What was once a studiously ignored piece suddenly turns into an imperative to publish. The chosen news outlets jump into action.

The green light can also click through indirect means. Consider the name, Jim Semivan. He is on Tom DeLonge’s team at the newly formed To the Stars Academy, the group which includes Mr. Elizondo, mentioned above. Here is a thumbnail bio of Mr. Semivan from Simon & Schuster publishers: “Jim retired in 2007 after a 25-year career in the Central Intelligence Agency’s National Clandestine Service. At the time of his retirement he was a member of the CIA’s Senior Intelligence Service. Jim served multiple overseas and domestic tours along with senior management positions in CIA headquarters. He is the recipient of the Agency’s Career Intelligence Medal.”

Semivan’s emergence in UFO disclosure activities would alert the New York Times that it should pay attention to any information coming out of To the Stars Academy. Semivan is more than a witness or a researcher. He’s a high-level man connected to the intelligence community. If he backs up a story, it’s “official.”

I’ll give you a name: Richard Dolan. Dolan is the author of books on UFOs, and he is a publisher in the same field. A highly intelligent observer, when he makes inferences from data he explains his reasons. He possesses a formidable knowledge of UFO incidents over the course of decades. Major media outlets could go to him as a direct source for articles, or as a guide who could point them to credible stories. But that doesn’t happen.

Why? Because Mr. Dolan could unleash “too much information.” He could open up too many cans of worms. And he doesn’t have an official position in government or corporate circles.

He is reliable, but not in the media sense of the word. He could give, say, the reporters at the New York Times far more help than their editors could—but that doesn’t matter.

What matters to the Times and other mainstream outlets is the agenda of the moment. And who will bolster that agenda.

Why isn’t long-time UFO researcher Grant Cameron writing op-ed pieces for the Times? He has a very interesting take on how various UFO spokespeople have been used by the military-intelligence complex. Alas, Cameron makes too much sense. He goes…

Continue Reading At: JonRappoport.wordpress.com

Somewhere in the Skies – Episode 01: Richard Dolan & Media Bias in UFO Coverage

Source: Ryan Sprage
May 8, 2017

On the premiere episode of SOMEWHERE IN THE SKIES, host, Ryan Sprague, introduces the listeners to the show and then speaks with historian and author, Richard Dolan, about the media and UFOs. They also discuss the possibility and forms of disclosure that may occur in a new American political era, and then they wrap things up by confronting the future of UFO studies. Richard Dolan is the author of two volumes of history, ‘UFOs and the National Security State’, both ground-breaking works which together provide the most factually complete and accessible narrative of the UFO subject available anywhere. He also co-authored a speculative book about the future, ‘A.D. After Disclosure’, the first-ever analysis not only of how UFO secrecy might end, but of the all-important question: what happens next Richard’s latest work, ‘UFOs for the 21st Century Mind’, provides a fresh treatment of the entire subject. In it, he discusses the important sightings, the encounters, the politics, the cover-up, ancient aliens, the bizarre science, disclosure, and offers advice on being both critical and open-minded in today’s world. Like his previous three books, it asks fresh questions and offers new insights to further our understanding of the UFO mystery. Richard hosts a weekly radio show, The Richard Dolan Show on KGRA Radio, is a frequent guest on Coast-to-Coast AM. He is currently featured on several television series and documentaries, including Ancient Aliens, Hangar One: The UFO Files, Close Encounters, and UFOs: The Lost Evidence. Prior to his interest in UFOs, Richard completed his graduate work at the University of Rochester, where he studied U.S. Cold War strategy, European history, and international diplomacy. Before that, he had studied at Alfred University and Oxford University, and had been a finalist for a Rhodes scholarship. In addition to his research, Richard’s company, Richard Dolan Press, actively publishes innovative books by authors from around the world. His website is http://www.richarddolanpress.com

Some Thoughts On J. Allen Hynek

FakeNews

Source:RichardDolanPress.com
Richard Dolan
April 21, 2002

[Author’s Note: With a few modifications, this article is essentially excerpted from the second edition of UFOs and the National Security State, Volume 1. I am indebted to UFO researcher Val Germann for his assistance in preparing this article.]

Astronomer J. Allen Hynek is universally regarded as the most important scientist in the history of Ufology. He has even been called the “Galileo” of UFO research.

Yet, it is impossible to ignore Hynek’s complicity in publicly debunking UFOs for years. His own justification is well known: in order to retain access to official UFO reports, he could not afford to risk an open confrontation with the Air Force. Hynek made these claims as a matter of self defense, years after the fact in the 1970s, after he had been criticized by nearly everyone in the UFO field as an Air Force lackey. That this was Hynek’s reputation in the 1950s and 1960s seems all but forgotten today.

Jacques Vallee worked very closely with Hynek for years during the 1960s, and eventually concluded that “the Air Force kept Hynek around only as long as he was silent.” This is certainly true. The question is, why did Hynek keep silent? Was it because he was an unassertive type of person – that is, because of a feature of his personality? Nearly all UFO researchers who have written about Hynek say, in effect: yes, for all of his scientific virtues, he was not a fighter. An unfortunate but all too human weakness.

A detached analysis of the historical record does not justify this conclusion.

Generally speaking, Hyenk was a genial man who did not seek out open confrontations. This, in fact, was one of the important traits that made him valuable to national security interests. In the first place, Hynek was much more than a mere civilian scientist who “helped out” the Air Force. From 1942 to 1946, Hynek took a leave of absence from Ohio State University to work at the Johns Hopkins University, in Silver Springs, Maryland. While there, he was in charge of document security for the highly classified project sponsored by the Navy to develop a radio proximity fuse.

Along with radar and the atomic bomb, this is often considered as one of the three great scientific developments of the war. The device was a radio-operated fuse designed to screw into the nose of a shell and timed to explode at any desired distance from target.

  1. Allen Hynek. A central, and problematic, figure in the history of UFO research.

Many scientists, of course, performed work for the defense establishment during World War Two. But Hynek’s project was of considerable importance, and it does not appear that his main contribution was scientific: after all, he was an astrophysicist. Rather, one of his main efforts was in a security related area.

Vallee kept a diary during the period that he worked with Hynek. It remained unpublished until 1992 as Forbidden Science, long after Hynek was dead and enshrined as the “father of scientific ufology.” When read with care, Vallee’s observations make it clear that there was much more to J. Allen Hynek than initially met the eye. And yet, the UFO research community has continued to ignore the implications, and even the plain facts, that Vallee related.

The proximity fuse was six times more effective than the timed fuses it replaced. Hynek was in charge of document security for the development of this important weapon

For example, rumors had abounded through the 1960s that Blue Book was a public relations facade, and that there was a “secret study” of UFOs going on. Vallee, too, had his suspicions, and broached this subject with Hynek every so often. Hynek inevitably rejected such opinions without reservation. Blue Book, Hynek maintained, was the real thing, albeit a project that was being done incompetently.

Vallee was never quite convinced. He noticed Hynek’s cagey attitude about UFOs, that he seemed to know much more than he usually let on about the subject, that he often appeared to be more interested in self promotion than actual study of the problem, and that his personal records were in a state of near disaster.

Then Vallee found the infamous “Pentacle Memorandum” in Hynek’s office. This was a highly classified document from January 1953, proving the existence of a separate study group of UFOs, and which urged that the Robertson Panel be delayed until they had come to their own conclusions. Very strong stuff. In the mid 1960s, there was still no inkling among the wider public that there was any such study as this.

On another occasion, a colleague of Vallee and Hynek showed Vallee “some very interesting photographs taken from an airplane.” Here is the relevant passage:

“Do you know who took these? Allen did! But he hasn’t recorded the place, the date or the time …” It turns out Allen was aboard an airliner when he suddenly noticed a white object at his altitude, seemingly flying at the same speed as the plane. He made sure it wasn’t a reflection and he convinced himself it must be some faraway cloud with an unusual shape. He pulled out his camera ‘to see how fast he could snap pictures.’ In all he took two pairs of stereoscopic photographs and gave it no more thought.

The photographs themselves appeared in a book authored by Hynek and Vallee in 1975, The Edge of Reality. They may or may not be of a flying saucer, but they are certainly not clouds. The importance of stereoscopic photographs cannot be overemphasized. Such a camera is of outstanding evidentiary value. Hynek, in effect, had captured a possible Holy Grail on film. But what happened?

Vallee continues:

Fred only learned about this a few weeks later. But then Hynek had lost the negatives and one shot from every pair was missing. … Naturally the loss of the negatives makes it impossible to determine whether it was really a cloud or not. Fred is indignant: “Sometimes I have the feeling Allen doesn’t want to know,” he says.

Hynek, who had headed document security for the proximity fuse project, “lost” one (and only one) negative from such a set as this. One might well wonder, to whom did he actually pass this material?

One of the two photographs Hynek took from a plane with a stereoscopic camera. He nevertheless lost one (and only one) negative from each image.

During another conversation, Hynek mentioned to Vallee that the Air Force had sent him a new contract draft. He did not know whether or not he should sign it, and gave it to Vallee to read.

Vallee wrote:

The contract, I was surprised to read, was not really with the Air Force but with the Dodge Corporation, a subsidiary of McGraw Hill. “What’s McGraw Hill doing in the middle of all this?” I asked without trying to hide my bafflement. “Is that some sort of cut out?” “Oh, they are just contractors to the Foreign Technology Division,” Hynek replied. “By working through companies like McGraw Hill, which is a textbook publisher, it’s easier for them to hire professors and scholars to conduct some Intelligence activities, keeping up with Soviet technology, for example. Many academics would be nervous saying they were working for the Foreign Technology Division.” The contract clearly puts Hynek under the administrative supervision of a man named Sweeney, who is not a scientist. And it clearly specifies Hynek’s task as evaluating the sightings of unknown objects to determine if they represent a danger for the security of the United States.

Hynek’s substantial Air Force money was passed to him through a third party. Thus, Hynek’s relationship with “security” continued right through the 1960s. We also learn from Vallee that Hynek, despite his monthly trips to Wright-Patterson AFB, almost never saw Blue Book Chief Hector Quintanilla, but was received personally by the commander, who usually took him to lunch at the officer’s club. When Vallee asked Hynek what they talked about, Hynek replied, “innocently,” the weather and foreign cuisine.

The preceding passage raises other unanswered questions, such as how many other academics were receiving cut out money to hide their intelligence value? Hynek’s remarks implied that he knew quite a lot about this topic, but unfortunately, the conversation appeared to stop dead at that point. One might also wonder, who was Sweeney? And, since Hynek was being funded through one cut out organization, why not two (not at all an unusual intelligence practice)? That is, was the Air Force itself a cut out for another organization? This is currently an unanswerable question, but well worth asking in light of the clear evidence that the CIA was a major perhaps the major player behind the scenes in the UFO mystery.

Another interesting and generally ignored fact about Hynek was the close relationship he had with C. The astronomical community has always been small, and of course it is not surprising that, aside from the issue of UFOs, the two men would know each other well. But this relationship was more than a simple professional acquaintance.

From 1955 to 1960, for instance, Hynek was associate director of the Smithsonian Institution’s Astrophysics Observatory in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and headed its optical satellite tracking program. During this period he also lectured at Harvard University. Menzel, meanwhile, had been a full professor at Harvard since 1938 and was the most prestigious astrophysicist in North America. For all intents and purposes, Menzel was Harvard’s Astronomy Department. While Hynek was in town, Menzel was full director of the Harvard Observatory, and (as Vallee noted in passing) was Hynek’s mentor. On one occasion, Hynek declined to write a Forward for Menzel’s book. One assumes, then, that Menzel asked in the first place.

Donald Menzel was an arch-UFO debunker, senior member of the U.S. intelligence community, and an alleged MJ-12 member. He was also a mentor of J. Allen Hynek.

When considering the public opposition the two occasionally had (such as their participation in a scientific debate on UFOs in late 1952), this closeness seems out of place. But the public view is often the misleading view.

Menzel, of course, was not merely one of the world’s leading astronomers. He was a man tightly connected to the upper levels of the American national security community, and personally close to Vannevar Bush. During the war, Menzel chaired the Radio Propagation Committee of the Joint and Combined Chiefs of Staff and the Section of Mathematical and Physical Research of U.S. Naval Communications. He was a top level cryptologist who had a longstanding association with the National Security Agency, possessed a Navy Top Secret Ultra security clearance, consulted for 30 companies on classified projects, and worked for the CIA. Through the entire 1950s, Menzel was still a serving intelligence officer.

Revelations such as these about are especially important when one considers how sanitized Hynek’s treatment continues to be at the hands of most writers in the UFO field. Indeed, even Menzel is sanitized. Jerome Clark, for instance, claimed that Menzel’s secret government work “does not significantly differentiate him from many other elite scientists of his generation.” There is some truth in this statement, but the larger picture is missed. What matters is that the surface and undercurrent move in different directions.

In the 1950s, as today, UFOs were a topic of great secrecy. They were important. In this context, the classified lives of men like Hynek and Menzel matter a very great deal. These were men strongly connected with the topic of UFOs, who by their outward appearance were at antipodes. Yet, below the surface, many commonalities existed.

Hynek’s defenders have remained at the surface, claiming that his position on UFOs evolved over the years from skeptic to believer. Such a simple transition is unlikely. For years, Hynek had access to classified Air Force UFO reports. Many of those reports were unusual and unconventional – as Hynek himself stated years after the fact – and the Air Force official explanations for many of these were clearly absurd. Yet, for year after year, he did nothing. Even followers in good faith might ask: what took him so long?

Hynek’s remarks and insights, provided years after the fact, remain of value to the UFO researcher. But the careful reader must remain mindful of Hynek’s history in this subject. It is a history that, depending upon which character flaw was his correct one, leads any serious researcher into a stance of wariness regarding J. Allen Hynek.

Read More At: RichardDolanPress.com

Everywhere, By Stealth

FakeNews
Source: RichardDolanPress.com
Richard Dolan
November 8, 2011

Every day, spectacular events occur in the skies, in space, in the oceans, and on the ground. Astonished witnesses around the world see them. For many, the shock of something so extraordinary, so inexplicable, is a consciousness-shattering experience, never forgotten. Yet few of them tell anyone at all of what they saw, save perhaps a close friend or family member.

The things they see are of some variety, but which often fall within one of several categories. Here is a report that is typical. It describes an event that occurred in Hydes, Maryland, on May 15, 1976, but wasn’t reported until twenty-three years later to the National UFO Reporting Center, on the World Wide Web. The witness who wrote about this was with five other people, all adults and professionals, lying on the front lawn of a farm after dinner at about 7 p.m. To their great surprise, they saw an enormous, round craft approach slowly from the horizon, perhaps at 30 or 40 miles per hour. It slowly rotated in counter-clockwise direction; white lights were visible on the outer edges. The witness estimated the object’s diameter to be 1,000 feet, although it was hard to notice details, due to the sunlight at the time of day. When the object appeared over them, it stopped and split into four smaller, wedged shaped craft. Then, in the “blink of an eye,” the objects zoomed away to the North, South, East, and West. There was never a sound during the sighting. “To this day,” writes the witness, “we have never spoken about this to anyone, not even ourselves.”

This sighting is extraordinary, inexplicable, and utterly commonplace. The records of UFO reports describe many examples of craft that are silent, divide into smaller segments, and zip away noiselessly at amazing speeds. Not only do ordinary people report them, but so do military personnel. As with the military, so it is with civilians that silence is usually the rule when it comes to UFOs. The reasons differ, of course, just as trauma and fear of ridicule differ from secrecy protocols.

However one wishes to interpret the phenomenon, every indication points to the number of UFO witnesses being not in the thousands, but the millions. Whether one considers the subject to be bunk, or of the utmost seriousness, people are seeing things which are affecting them deeply. Because there are no institutional structures for them to report, or even talk about, what they saw, they keep silent and try to forget what is unquestionably the most incredible experience of their lives. For some, time takes its eventual toll on the strength of their convictions, and they convince themselves that maybe what they saw wasn’t all that incredible. They keep silent, of course, because they fear being labeled as crazy — a luxury few can afford.

Seeing is not always believing, much less understanding. What matters is seeing with the right perspective. History provides many examples of people seeing things that were denied by higher authorities; even more of people who saw old things in new ways, and were ignored. Galileo failed to get the Pope even to look at Jupiter’s moons through a telescope. In the 18th century, the French Academy of Science denied that stones could fall from the heavens, and rejected the mass of witnesses testimony as superstitious nonsense. For most of the 20th century, scientists dismissed continental drift as fantasy, despite the observations that Africa and South America seemed to fit together, and shared many geological properties.

Leaving science for politics, the examples become more dramatic, almost surreal. The last century has provided several instances of entire peoples being liquidated amid blanket denials from their killers. Each time, witnesses came forth to announce what was happening, only to face silence or dismissal. Meanwhile, entire nations, such as the Armenians, Ukrainians, Kazakhs, Jews, Slavs, Cambodians, and East Timorese — to name merely the best known — were ravaged.

The mass of ignored UFO sightings fits into this pattern, whatever its ultimate answer may be. You may see; you may know. Whether you can persuade in the face of official denials is entirely different.

This pattern evolved over the last century. The airship wave of 1897, for instance, mirrored our own age by commanding broad public interest, then vanishing into the collective memory hole. Early witnesses, however, responded to these sightings rather differently than today. Official ridicule was less important, talk of aliens was non-existent (except for a few isolated jokes about men from Mars), and people were more forthcoming to their local, independent, newspapers to describe what they saw. Mainly, there were fewer genuine UFO sightings, and people were less aware of the phenomenon. It was just as well; people had nowhere to report what they saw. In 1897, if you thought you saw an alien, you were on your own.

This changed after the Second World War, when sightings of anomalous events spiked dramatically upward. A crucial reason was that new technologies, such as radar, made it easier to detect UFOs, as did widespread aviation. Therefore, it is impossible to state conclusively that UFOs themselves became more common, despite this being the working assumption of most UFO writers. It is, however, a reasonable supposition, based upon the upsurge in reports by witnesses on the ground. If this is so, we cannot yet know why; we can only guess.

One point is beyond question: UFOs became important to our military and political elites. This required the collection of as much intelligence as fast as possible, and gives full flavor to the intense media coverage of flying saucers following Kenneth Arnold’s sighting of June 24, 1947. For months and years before Arnold’s encounter, Americans and Europeans, including military personnel, had been seeing UFOs. Early in 1947, for example, military aircraft had “chased” a UFO over the North Sea, only to be outmaneuvered and outraced. The intense media barrage following Arnold’s sighting lasted for two weeks, encouraged people from around the country to report what they saw, then stopped abruptly. Then, for the next two decades, military agencies such as Projects Sign, Grudge, and Blue Book continued to accept reports from the public — without lending any credence to them — which provided a useful service for the collection of intelligence.

From the late 1940s to the late 1960s, an American who saw a UFO could rest easy with the fiction that his government would investigate the event. Blue Book, however, was a mere collection point: it could not conduct any true analysis of UFOs and was only charged with debunking the matter to the public. This deficiency was apparent by the early 1950s; in response, two formidable private groups were able to compete with Blue Book for the collection of UFO reports: The National Investigative Committee on Aerial Phenomena (NICAP) and the Aerial Phenomena Research Organization (APRO). This institutional structure helped to give UFO witnesses a veneer of legitimacy.

Even so, most sightings went unreported. During Blue Book’s heyday, Air Force consultant Allen Hynek conservatively estimated that the program received less than ten percent of all actual UFO sightings. Accepting this logic translates into over 120,000 sightings of UFOs in the United States for roughly two decades, and a much larger number of witnesses. In light of Blue Book’s fallacious method of explaining most of these sightings, we are left with the unsettling conclusion that there were thousands upon thousands of legitimate UFO sightings during that period.

The era of institutional legitimacy was brief. By the mid-1960s, a new wave of UFO sightings created a sense of near-crisis. The role of Blue Book became a bit obvious when the best it could do, in effect, was to blame UFOs on swamp gas. The loss of public credibility outweighed any counter value Blue Book might have possessed as a collection agency of UFO reports. Its demise became inevitable from that point; by 1969 it was dead. Ironically, in closing its doors, Blue Book also vanquished its two main competitors, NICAP and APRO, neither of which ever recovered from the ‘bear market’ for UFOs that ensued in the aftermath.

Which brings us to our present era. An awesome number of UFO sightings continue to occur, but which now leave no echo within the public realm. Officially, the military no longer admits to investigating UFOs. Although several organizations accept UFO reports, few witnesses know of them. The largest UFO organization of the past thirty years, the Mutual UFO Network (MUFON), does not compare in size or quality to NICAP or APRO. The result is something like the situation prior to the 1940s, with nowhere for a witness to go, and nothing that officialdom will “do” about it. It is the situation of our six friends sitting on the lawn of their farm, watching in silent, isolated, awe as an object of unimaginable technology flew over their heads. Once again, we are on our own.

Such is the very rough, public development of the human response to the problem. Regarding the UFOs themselves, there have been a few consistent threads spanning the years. They operate by stealth. They are silent. They are everywhere. They have not publicly identified themselves. They represent technology that is impossible by known standards. For decades, people have claimed to see aliens, to have been abducted by them, and occasionally to have communicated with them.

Ensnared by the unknown between the poles of official silence and ridicule, people offer their own theories. The aliens are here to create a race of hybrids for future colonization of the planet. Or, they are tourists here to visit. Or, they are scientists studying us, bound by the prime directive of non-interference. Or, they are here for the Earth’s minerals and DNA. Or, they are space brothers seeking to enlighten those humans ready to receive their wisdom. Or, they are indifferent to our fate. Or, they are from our future. Or, they are demonic entities as portrayed in the New Testament. Or, they are angelic beings who can be channeled. Or, they are hyper-dimensional entities who can blip into and out of our reality. Or, they have been here all along and have guided human evolution.

There is no sure way out of this morass. Even official “disclosure” of UFOs — a laudable goal with fifty years of history — cannot reliably lead to a state of clarity. It is not certain from which source disclosure can come: does the President really know everything? Nor is there a way to verify the extent or accuracy of disclosure. Past official statements do not give cause for confidence. Indeed, the CIA has been claiming for several years that it has provided disclosure, after admitting to an interest in UFO reports to protect the existence of its classified aircraft. Further disclosures from official sources may provide information that fits along any point in the long spectra of completeness, accuracy, honesty, and intentions. In other words, we might in theory receive information that is complete, accurate, honest, and with the public’s best intentions in mind. Or, it may be incomplete, incorrect, dishonest, and with the intention to sell us down the river. Or anywhere in between.

We must also consider the likelihood that full and accurate disclosure may not be possible. Our leaders may know a little bit about this, or they may know much. There is no reason, however, to believe that they know everything of importance, or that they have a relationship with aliens on some level of parity. If others have arrived with technology far beyond our own, it is more likely that our leaders have not achieved “diplomatic” parity, or would learn anything more than what these others want them to know. This could be nearly anything. Self-serving dispensing of isolated facts comprises a large part of U. S. diplomatic history, and indeed the history of most nations; there is no apparent reason why it must be different with an advanced race.

Conceding the above, it remains that the fight to end UFO secrecy remains one of the great causes of our day. It is a struggle for truth, self-government, and survival. It is a call for courage in the face of a potentially grave threat. It is fighting the good fight, regardless of the consequences.

“Fight” may well be the most apt of all words. Based upon our limited knowledge about the underside of this phenomenon, humanity appears to be facing the presence of others under the worst possible circumstances. The maxim “divide and conquer” is well-worn in our own history. An observation of the human response to the presence of others suggests it is one they know as well.

 Read More At: RichardDolanPress.com

March Book Haul 2017

MarchBookHaul.jpg

TheBreakaway | BreakawayConciousness
Zy Marquiez
April 6, 2017

This month there were some serendipitous finds within the realm of books and reading that help feed the addict’s voracious hunger.  The topics are wide in scope as they are intriguing, and have made for some thought-provoking reading when I’ve had the time.

#1: The Nuclear Axis: Secret Collaboration Between West Germany & South Africa by Zdenek Cervenka & Barbara Rogers

The title says it all. This book details the connection between West Germany and South Africa, which is actually more disturbing than at first blush.  The book also delineates which other countries were involved in this fiasco besides South Africa, and shows that Germany, who went on record never to create nuclear weapons post World War 2, became in fact a de-facto nuclear power.  Then again, it shouldn’t be shocking considering that Germany’s attempted world domination in three previous instances.

#2:  Striking Thoughts: Bruce Lee’s Wisdom For Daily Living by Bruce Lee

Knowing that Bruce Lee is the epitome of Individuality, reading about him has been something that I’ve wanted to do for quite some time.

This book has been an inspiring read.  Due to its format, the book can be read straight through, or just broken up into small pieces given that it’s not a book which builds on itself like most non-fiction books.  For me the latter method has worked better.

Usually just slice off a few pages on a daily basis as the aphorisms give one much to ponder about in unexpected ways.  Granted, some of the aphorisms are fairly straight forward, but there’s plenty of insights to be had if one remains open minded.

#3Culture As History: The Transformation Of American Society In The Twentieth Century by Historian Warren Susman

Wishing to learn more about the change culture American culture has gone through, this book felt like a natural pick considering it was mentioned in Susan Cain’s Quiet – The Power Of Introverts In A World That Can’t Stop Talking.  In Quiet, Cain mentions how in her book Culture As History historian Susman covers the transition between the culture of character to a culture of personality.  Seeing the results of this change in modern times, thought it prudent to go back in time and see where society began changing.  Predictably, there was serious social engineering and propaganda taking place to bring this about.   I am definitely looking forward to research this topic further down the line.

#4:  The War Of Art: Break Through The Blocks & Win Your Inner Creative Battles  Steven Pressfield

This book barely became known to me a few weeks ago.  Being the book-addict that I am, initially, I told myself not to purchase this or any other book for that matter until catching up on some reading, but after about a week of pondering, I just couldn’t resist.  This merits a shout out to all bodacious bloggers that feed that addiction!  [If you got time and want to check out another fellow wordpress blogger on all things writing, click this link to check out Calliope Writing]

This book is like the Art Of War but doused with much inspiration and creativity.  If there’s even one cell of creativity within you, ruminate upon getting this book.

#5:  Speed: Facing Our Addiction To Fast & Faster – And Overcoming Our Fear Of Slowing Down by Dr. Stephanie Brown Ph.D.

This book covers society’s addiction to living at the vanguard at Warp 9.  This book brings about quite a few different concerns, especially considering that a sizeable portion of society follows the actions noted in this book to a tee, particularly the younger generations.  If you have young ones or know of anybody that might be plugged in to the matrix 24/7 so to speak, considering having them get this book.  There’s a review of it here.

#6:  UFOs for the 21st Century Mind by Richard Dolan

If you’ve ever wondered about where to start regarding the abstruse subjects of UFOs, START HERE.  Even if you have, this book still offers a lot of value given the severity of the subject.  Having read dozens of books on this subject, many books usually end up leaving the reader wanting more.  Additionally, there really isn’t anything as comprehensive and detailed as this.  The book is sourced to the hilt, is written in an easy to follow manner and considers a serious topic in a sobering and yet thought provoking way.  There’s a review that was written on this here.

#7J.R.R. Tolkien’s: A Biography by Humphrey Carpenter

Having binged on many Tolkien books in February, and having heard from John Taylor Gatto that reading many biographies allows individuals the foresight to see things they might have not seen, thought getting this book would be a prudent choice.  Haven’t delved into it, but hopefully am able to within the next month or so.

#8:  The Autobiography Of Benjamin Franklin by Benjamin Franklin

Along the same lines as the above, this book was purchased in order to brush up a bit on one of the Founding Fathers through the autobiographical lens.  It’s definitely fascinating getting an inner look at one of the people responsible for helping create America.  It helps put things into perspective in a way that history books lack.   Review will come up soon.

#9:  The Elements Of Style [4th Edition] by William Strunk Jr. & E.B. White

This book was purchased with the intention to grow and learn as a writer.  Being an autodidact and seeking to teach myself more on this lengthy subject, this seemed like a prudent place to start.  BOY WAS IT WORTH IT.  The book, although small in size, offers much knowledge to glean from it.  If you’re a writer, you need to get this book for the tenets within it will undoubtedly help you grow.  That said, there is a newer version of this book available.  Found this out about a week after purchasing the first one, go figure!  Given that it isn’t in my hands yet, I can’t vouch for it, YET, but once it gets here it will be read and reviewed in due time.

Why read a book similar to one just read?  Great question.  Because the 4th Edition of Elements of Style offered so much, I thought that if the new book followed through and offer even more information than the previous book, why not give it a gander?  Might end up gifting the other one out to a friend, but either way, the investment will be well placed.

#10:  The Book Of Virtues: A Treasure Of Great Moral Stories by William J. Bennett

A veritable treasure trove of insights on virtue from countless angles, this book homes in on many of the core tents that used to get taught in society but don’t get taught as much nowadays.  It seems like a great place to seek historical sources that showcase virtues within literature.

#11:  Sekret Machines: Gods: Volume 1 Of Gods Man & War by Tom DeLonge & Peter Levenda

I reviewed this book a few weeks ago and predictably, it is being censored by Amazon, as per usual.  If you want to read how to verify the censorship, read the next bracketed paragraph, and if not, just skip it for the synopsis.

[This can be verified simply.  Click on the link above, scroll down to the reviews, and then take a look at the two pictures to the right of customers who took pictures of the book.  The picture on the right under the name ZyPhReX, was the review done by me.  As you can see from the picture, I gave the book 3 stars.  Now, when you go back into the original book link, and click to check on all reviews that gave the book 3 stars, my review will NOT be showing whatsoever.  My contention is that not only is my review critical of this book in sobering fashion, but it also outlines alternative books to this topic, and that’s something the consortium hates to hear.  Regardless of the reason, the Book Review being censored is ludicrous since it follows all guidelines by Amazon, and the review is even shown under the picture.  And no, this isn’t the first time and its happened and doubt it will be the last.]

My original thoughts were that since Peter Levenda is a top-notch researcher, of whom many books I own, and seeing as DeLonge seems to have a genuine curiosity on the subject, the book might be a good read.  Boy was I wrong!

Although the book does feature intriguing information, the authors paint a picture that’s quite bleak of humanity, even using the parlance of “Cargo Cult” for humans and even go on to write about humanity as if wholly incapable, even there’s plethora of evidence showing otherwise.

Moreover, the authors take a very narrow point of views in explaining UFOs, which is quite detrimental.  Not that beings from another place visiting the Earth is out of the question, far from it, but to use a one dimensional approach to explain a multi-dimensional issue served to make this book a catastrophe.

As I noted in the review of this book:

“… one particular point that was quite disconcerting is the fact that the authors take a unilateral point of view of making it seem like UFOs can only be explained by the alien mythos.  While this is certainly one possibility, and one with some solid grounding, it is not the only one, and not by far.  Dr. Joseph P. Farrell, Walter Bosley, and others have come up with an equally arguable case that argues for human ingenuity as one possible way to explain some UFOs.”

Lastly, a rather unexpected find was being able to get almost 20 National Geographic magazines, each for 10 cents at the library.  I am sharing this in hopes for people to realize that sometimes at local libraries there are incredible deals if you happen to venture there at the right time.

That said, did any of you purchase any intriguing books recently?  If so, what were they?  I am always genuinely curious as to what other individuals read and find intriguing. A significant portion of what I choose to read is because of what other people have made known to me, either directly or indirectly, and  this is my attempt to pay it forward.

Hope you are all well and have a great week.

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This article is free and open source. You are encouraged and have permission to republish this article under a Creative Commons license with attribution to Zy Marquiez and TheBreakaway.wordpress.com.
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About The Author:

Zy Marquiez is an avid book reviewer, researcher, an open-minded skeptic, yogi, humanitarian, and freelance writer who studies and mirrors regularly subjects like Consciousness, Education, Creativity, The Individual, Ancient History & Ancient Civilizations, Forbidden Archaeology, Big Pharma, Alternative Health, Space, Geoengineering, Social Engineering, Propaganda, and much more.

His own personal blog is BreakawayConsciousnessBlog.wordpress.com where his personal work is shared, while TheBreakaway.wordpress.com serves as a media portal which mirrors vital information usually ignored by mainstream press, but still highly crucial to our individual understanding of various facets of the world.