Google’s intolerant workplace culture will cost it everything

Source: ActivistPost.com
August 17, 2017

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Dr. Joseph P. Farrell Speaks At Length About The Election, Rampant Voter Fraud, Mainstream Media Failing, Solutions & Much More

Source: GizaDeathStar.com
Dr. Joseph P. Farrell
November 11, 2016

Women Who Spend Decades Working 60-Hour Weeks Are Three Times More At Risk For Cancer, Heart Disease & Diabetes

Work hours
Source: NaturalNews.com
Sarah Landers
July 4, 2016

A new study by The Ohio State University reveals that long work hours for women are linked to alarming increases in cancer, heart disease and the early development of other chronic, life-threatening illnesses. Women who put in extra hours for the bulk of their careers – with work weeks that average 60 hours or more over three decades – may end up paying a huge price. In fact, those women are thought by scientists to be tripling their risk of diabetes, cancer, heart trouble and arthritis.

According to researchers at The Ohio State University, the risk starts to increase when women put in more than 40 hours per week at work – but the risks increase steeply when they work more than 50 hours. Allard Dembe, professor of health services management and policy, stated: “Women – especially women who have to juggle multiple roles – feel the effects of intensive work experiences and that can set the table for a variety of illnesses and disability. People don’t think that much about how their early work experiences affect them down the road. Women in their 20s, 30s and 40s are setting themselves up for problems later in life.”

The study, published in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, explains that men with tough work schedules are less affected. That determination was made after analyzing data from interviews with almost 7,500 people. This is thought to be because women tend to take on most of the responsibilities at home, and therefore face more pressure and stress than men when they work long hours. Because of this difficult balance between work demands and family obligations, work for women may also be less satisfying than it is for men.

What does this mean for working women?

According to The Ohio State University, employers and government regulators should be aware of these risks, especially for women who are required to work more than 40 hours per week. It is important that companies realize that they will benefit more in terms of work quality and output when women are healthier and happier.

More scheduling flexibility, health screening and support have been suggested as being crucial to reducing the chances of employees becoming sick as a result of chronic conditions that develop from years of overwork.

Workers who put in more hours face more stress, and have more sleep problems and digestive trouble – making them more fatigued. This affects their work performance and their health. In the study, a surprising minority of full-time workers put in fewer than 40 hours a week.

Ways to look after your health

If you are a woman working more than 40 hours a week, who simply cannot cut down on her hours, there are changes you can make to your diet that will help to improve your overall health and reduce your likelihood of developing these illnesses. Try incorporating more of the following anti-cancer foods into your diet:

  • Cruciferous vegetables, such as cauliflower, garlic, cabbage and onions. These protect your DNA from damage, because they contain glucosinolates that optimize cellular functions.
  • Dark green leafy vegetables, such as spinach and kale. These veggies contain the powerful antioxidants lutein and zeaxanthin that are key to cancer prevention.
  • Lentils and chickpeas. These provide calcium, iron and B vitamins which are associated with reduced breast cancer risk.
  • Foods high in lycopene, such as tomatoes, watermelon and papaya. This antioxidant has also been associated with reduced cancer risk.

A healthy diet and plenty of exercise are key to preventing and treating many diseases. So, if you really can’t cut back on your hours, make sure you pay closer attention to what you eat, and get active!

Read More At: NaturalNews.com

Applications of MBT with Tom Campbell [Part 1] – Life, Work & Money

EBTV on http://evolvingbeings.com presents host Evita Ochel with returning guest Tom Campbell of http://my-big-toe.com covering practical applications of MBT – My BIG Theory of Everything.

In this part 1 of 5 topics revolve around life, work and money, touching upon the political, economic systems, as well as morality and integrity.

Tom is a leading researcher and authority on consciousness, reality and out of body experiences, which he has been studying for over 30 years. He is a physicist, lecturer and author of the My BIG TOE trilogy.

PART 1: Life, Work & Money

1. As everything comes down to perception, how can we increase our perception to be most in alignment with our true nature? (2:40)
– An explanation to understand that perception includes 5 different components.
– Tom explains what those are and how they each limit/constrain or expand our perception.
– How the size of your awareness is related to the size of your reality, and to the size of your perception.

2. Many of us are stuck on right/wrong, and morality issues, how can we make sense of what is really right or wrong in light of the bigger picture of MBT and a virtual reality? (13:45)
– Understanding what constitutes a right action according to MBT
– An explanation that it is not about the action, but about the intent that makes it right or wrong

3. In our productivity, goal and success driven world, there are a lot of “should’s” and “have to’s” in people’s lives, but based on a virtual reality model do we really have to do anything? (21:15)
– The importance of being versus doing
– What we really have to do, and why
– The distinction between intellectual-level action versus being-level action
– The importance of personal change on a fundamental level of being
– The error of focusing on the problem versus the solution, for example with weight loss
– The fallacy of following what “feels good”

4. How does our work/career choice impact us and the system on a greater level, and why does it matter how we choose to fill most of our days? (33:00)
– Understanding how what you make of your job is more important than what your actual job is
– The importance of your state of being, versus doing within your work
– Learning to balance personal aspirations, and not getting caught up in status or Ego

5. How to deal with having a job or position that does not hold the greater good in mind? (40:00)
– An understanding of integrity and morality choices within one’s life
– Learning how to be part of the solution versus part of the problem
– Understanding how to work with the rule set within this reality and how to make the best of it
– The futility of trying to make or force others to change
– The importance of focusing on personal being and action with respect to what one does, or how one does it

6. How to make sense of money and our economy, which is still a struggle for many as good versus bad? (48:12)
– Tom explains how to understand money as a tool, and how we dictate the meaning it receives
– An explanation of different political/economic systems and why they are not the problem, but rather the people populating them
– The importance of evolving the quality of our consciousness to have the most efficient change within society
– Being able to see the system as a representation of us

7. How do we not negate what is within our systems (politics, economics, consumerism, healthcare, etc), while not being used by it, or kept “asleep” by it, or having our personal growth stunted by it? (55:00)
– Tom explains that it is always about personal accountability and intent—no one or no thing can force change upon us, or enslave us
– The importance of being the example ourselves, being the change, being the solution
– How to make peace with the current system and rule set in place that constitutes our “neighbourhood”
– An explanation to understand how the people in influential positions are not any different than us
– Understanding how the outer world is a representation of our inner world, macrocosm versus microcosm and knowing that we can only change ourselves

What Is The Best Use Of Your Time

By: Zy Marquiez
November 17, 2015

“There is a vitality, a life force, an energy, a quickening that is translated through you into action, and because there is only one of you in all time, this expression is unique. And if you block it, it will never exist through any other medium and will be lost.”
—Martha Graham

Recently, someone who has been in my life by way of friendship shared a post on social media. A simple post, really. Or was it?

Let us backtrack one second.

Just earlier today, my mind was traveling through the endless escape that was insomnia, and lo and behold, idea after idea kept sprouting like a field of seeds which was bathed in eternal rain and sunshine.

Gears were turning, levers were pulled, ideas created, filtered, musings edited, so on and so forth. My purpose at this point seemed like an afterthought.  Since sleeplessness had reared its ugly head, this itself gave me a great opportunity; it occurred to me, why not use it?

Thus, after a while of catching up with news online, my said friend had shared a picture that stated one of the very questions that myself just happened to be ruminating on. Quite a coincidence.

It’s a rather simple, yet direct question: What is the best use of your time?

Really, what is it? Is it currently doing what you are doing? Personally, even being cognizant of how important efficient time-management is to me, it can still be daunting to try and be 100% efficient, 100% of the time. Seems rather mechanical doesn’t it? In my personal case, it’s just important that time is not misused, and would rather learn something interesting, learn something important. Better yet, time used in fashion to help myself, and/or help others. Now that is a large driver in my life.

Let us tackle the issue of time use with a simple notion.

Many folks have a penchant for watching TV. A lot of TV. For the myriad reasons that it takes place, the bottom line is that the average person watches 5 hours of TV per day. That amounts to 1,825 hours per year. That is 18250 hours per decade, and 91,250 hours per 50 years. That’s a lot of time! Over the course of 50 years, the totality of the time spent watching TV daily amounts to 3802 consecutive 24-hour days, over that span.  Or “just” 5 hours a day, for 50 years.

Not sure about how others see it, but for me at least, that’s an overwhelming amount of time that could be rather well spent elsewhere.

This is just a nuts and bolts cursory overview of time management in relation to efficiency. Furthermore, that does not take into account the amount of time people spend watching videos/tv online.

For the sake of simplicity, let us assume most of us happen to get 8 hours a day sleeping [yeah, its probably not that much, but let’s stick with it for a moment]. If one were to subtract an 8-hour sleep cycle from the total of 24 hours in a day, then you have 16 available hours to do as you please. Without even getting into whether one works or not, 5 out of those 16 available hours, or nigh 1/3 of all of the average person’s free time is being used by the average person to watch TV.

Fast forward far into the future. Let us crank the levers of imagination here for a second.

At the back end of one’s entire life, one can imagine that sooner or later in a moment of introspection a person might ponder about all those great times. You know, back in the day – a phrase that even many younglings use now days as if they’ve been around for many decades, and such. If one can imagine one of the people that spent an enormous amount of time watching TV, would that person be happy with themselves if they spent nigh 1/3 of all of the free time they had while they were alive watching television?

Let us be more precise. Where does adding 40 hours of work a week put us?

In an entire 168 hour work-week where the average person spends, 56 hours a week sleeping, and 40 hours a week working, that leaves one with 72 hours free. If one were to spend 35 hours a week viewing television, then that would leave 37 hours of free time. That’s nearly half of all of one’s available time spent watching television. That seems ludicrous, does it not?

Many people will propound the idea that they are tired, want to decompress, have had a ‘long day’, so on and so forth. One hears it quite often. That is completely understandable, to a point. But, don’t you think a person rather spend that free time with their loved ones? By the way, if watching TV with your loved ones is the APEX of quality time, then…you might want to rethink the meaning of the word quantity quality.

Why pose such a question? Because, in a world where poverty, all disease, war, et al. are not only endemic, but increasing, does it not stand to reason that a person should do all they can to protect themselves mentally/physically/psychologically/spiritually? Seems reasonable. But are people really putting that much – if any – time to not become a statistic? That however does not seem like a reasonable assumption, seeing as the numbers of folks facing a myriad of issues are increasing year in and year out unceasing.

If people were really doing everything they could to break free of the matrix of control that harvests them, would poverty, disease, war, etc. be increasing? Definitely not.

Some will instantly throw their hands in the air and say, but the republicans/democrats this, or the corporations that, or secret societies “control everything!” While there is endemic corruption in the modern landscape, do those groups/institutions really ‘control everything’?

Do they really? We just made a reasonable case that nearly half of all the free time the average person has in their entire lifetime is carried out choosing to watch TV. Don’t the very groups that people are quick to blame benefit from the inaction of watching TV, that when added up of a combined populace, numbers in the millions of hours of…watching TV? How many hours of extra labor [if one wanted too], or extra self-education, or extra exercise could be carried out by the individual if he/she were to apply a microscopic amount of all that extra TV time, into striving to be the very best of themselves? Think folks would get the picture?

The interesting aspect is that this whole mental exercise also does not take into account how much money goes directly into funding things that people claim they oppose, but which they financially support day in and day out. How many tens of millions of dollars are being spent inefficiently, rather than perhaps investing in the best thing one could, themselves? That number has to be beyond astronomical.

How could an individual ever breakaway their consciousness from this system/matrix, if so much time is spent doing such things?

Now that the levers of imagination have been shifted accordingly, what do you think people will decide? Keep in mind, one need not use all of the time that was use watching TV, doing something else. Just one hour daily, used in an ultra-efficient manner that directly benefits your mind/body/soul would be worth pursuing.

What kind of benefits would accrue if those hours add into the dozens or even hundreds per year? What about thousands of hours over a lifetime? That would create quite a powerful and capable individual – a boundless universe of conscious creation.

How much could one change in their life? What about their community? What about the world? How much could one create spending just a minute amount of time pushing yourself farther than you ever thought possible?

Why don’t we find out? The door is wide open. It’s only a choice.

A blank canvas awaits – a large marble uncut stone slab – for wondrous creation. Await those who want more. It awaits those who are not satisfied with their current path.