2 Hidden Reasons You Can’t Lose Weight – my guest is Dr. KellyAnn Petrucci

Source: TheSpaDr
Dr. Trevor Holly Gates | Dr. KellyAnn Petrucci
March 2, 2017

Learn more at – http://thespadr.com/dr-kellyann-petru…

Our guest Dr. Kellyann Petrucci is a weight loss and natural anti-aging expert. She runs a private practice in the Birmingham, Michigan area and is the author of six books, including Paleo for Dummies and the upcoming Dr. Kellyann’s Bone Broth Diet. You also might recognize Kellyann from her appearances on The Doctors and Dr. Oz.

In today’s podcast Dr. Kellyann shares with us:
– 2 hidden reasons why people have trouble losing weight
– 3 fat burning foods you can eat to lose weight, strike a healthy balance in your body, and reboot your system
– Her personal bone broth recipe

How Stress Leads to Weight Gain

Source: iHealthTube.com
February 13, 2017

Why does prolonged stress, even internal stressers that we may not notice, often lead to weight gain? Dr. Doni Wilson discusses how your body handles those stresses and what is going on internally that can lead to weight gain.

Splenda Suppresses Thyroid Function, Promotes Weight Gain

Splenda Suppresses Thyroid and Promotes Weight Gain, Research Suggests
Source: GreenMedInfo.com
Sayer Ji
January 6, 2017

Is sucralose (aka Splenda) really as safe a sugar alternative as its manufacturers and advertisers claim, or is it really a toxic chemical causing a wide range of health problems including thyroid suppression and weight gain? New research sheds light on this question.

A concerning new study published in the European Journal of Nutrition entitled, “Type of sweet flavour carrier affects thyroid axis activity in male rats,” is the first study of its kind to evaluate the effects of Splenda (Sucralose) on mammalian thyroid function and metabolism. Their findings reveal that sucralose has endocrine disruptive properties on the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis (HPA axis), resulting in thyroid hormone suppression, increased appetite, and weight gain.

The Many Documented Harms of Sucralose (aka Splenda)

Before we delve into the details of the new paper, it is important for our readers to understand that this study is not novel in finding harm. There is, in fact, an accumulating body of research on sucralose showing this chemical marketed as an artificial sweetener is causing a wide range of adverse health effects. For instance, our sucralose research portal reveals 15 different signals of harm linked to this artificial sweetener, such as neurotoxicity.

When you add to this well-established body of research the recent discovery that sucralose produces carcinogenic dioxins when heated, the bitter truth about this artificial sweetener, namely, that it is a chemical in the same class as highly toxic pesticides like DDT, comes to light.

This is all the more disturbing when you consider that Splenda is regularly advertised to consumers as a safe sugar alternative specifically for baking applications. For instance, have you seen the TV ads where parents are encouraged to use it presumably to keep their kids healthier than if they used natural sweeteners? If not, you can visit the Splenda Baking and Cooking page which features a picture of a woman holding her son while baking. Also consider that a recent government-funded study found sucralose contaminated 65% of all breast milk samples assayed. In other words, the use of this toxicant is so prevalent that even our most vulnerable populations are incapable of opting out of being exposed to it.

Sucralose has already been demonstrated to promote weight gain and diabetes which undermines its primary marketed ‘benefit.’ Indeed, the new study also found that it promotes weight gain in comparison to an equally sweet, isocaloric diet that only differed in that the sweet sensation was produced by sugar. So, let’s get to the study details now…

Splenda’s Endocrine Disruptive Properties Revealed

The straightforward purpose of the study was described as follows:

“Non-nutritive sweeteners are the most widely used food additives worldwide. However, their metabolic outcomes are still a matter of controversy and their effect on the thyroid activity, a key regulator of metabolism, has not been previously studied. Therefore, we aim to determine the influence of the sweet type flavour carrier on selected parameters of thyroid axis activity.”

In order to accomplish this, they studied 105  Sprague-Dawley rats, divided into 3 groups, who were fed at their will (ad libitum) for 3 weeks one of the three different diets. The diets had identical caloric content (isocaloric), comprised of starch (wheat starch)differing in the following ways: Diet #1 contained no sugar.  Diet #2 contained 10% sucrose (10 grams). Diet #3 contained enough Sucralose (.0167 grams)  to create the same sweet flavor intensity as Diet #2 (10% sucrose).

“The results obtained indicate that both the presence and the type of sweet taste flavour carrier affect thyroid axis activity both at fasting and postprandial state. Compared to diet with sucrose which stimulates thyroid axis activity, sucralose addition diminishes thyroid hormone synthesis as thyroid peroxidase (TPO) activity, plasma thyroxine (T4), and triiodothyronine (T3) concentration was lower than in SC [sucrose containing] and NS [not sweet] while in non-sweet diet the lowest level of hepatic deiodinase type 1 (DIO1) and the highest reverse T3 (rT3) level indicate on altered thyroid hormone peripheral metabolism.”

In other words, sucralose significantly altered the thyroid and metabolic functions of the animals in a manner that could overlap with the symptoms of hypothyroidism.

The researchers concluded:

“One principal finding of this study concerns the close relationship between the sweet flavour carrier and the pituitary-thyroid axis activity, which is involved in the meta]bolic adaptation to meal composition. This effect may be observed at various levels. Sucralose intake seems to diminish thyroid axis activity by decreasing TPO activity, TSH, and plasma total TH concentrations, but at the same time, it increases both free T3 and T4 indexes. Those findings confirmed that sucralose is physiologically active and may provoke disturbances in thyroid axis activity.”

It is important to understand that this study proves sucralose is not ‘metabolically inert’ as often claimed when questions of its toxicity are raised. Sucralose also increased appetite and weight gain — two things that run diametrically opposed to consumer perception and the irresponsible marketing of its “benefits.”

The study provides more details:

“Both food intake and body mass gain were significantly affected by the type of diet (for both p < 0.001). In total, the highest food intake was recorded in the SU [sucralose] group. The average daily intake of sucralose with the diet (14.2 ± 0.4 mg/kg body weight/day) did not exceed the acceptable daily intake (ADI, 15 mg/kg body weight/day).

The food intake recorded during the meal before euthanasia did not differ between NS [not sweet], SC [sucrose], and SU [sucralose], and was 3.98 ± 0.5, 4.22 ± 0.41, and 4.71 ± 0.5, respectively.

The total daily body weight gain in the SU group was significantly higher than in SC and NS, which represented the lowest value (for both p < 0.001). Therefore, the highest diet growth efficiency was also recorded in SU, and there were no differences between NS and SC (Table 2).”

Because previous research has established that dietary carbohydrates directly affect thyroid axis activity, the study was designed to keep the carbohydrate content identical in order to isolate only the difference between the artificial and natural sweetener.  The results provide compelling evidence that the difference in thyroid and metabolic effects observed between the study groups were due entirely to sucralose’s significant and complex toxicological properties.

Of Mice and Men

The question often emerges following animal studies, as to whether the findings can be extrapolated to humans. The study addresses this point directly as follows:

“Despite the known species derived differences in thyroid economy between humans and rodents [65, 66], it was demonstrated that total T4 levels in rodents are a valid indicator of thyroid function in relation to effects in humans [67]. Moreover, humans and rats might be equally sensi-tive to TH synthesis disruptors, and even though in rats the response occurs after a shorter exposure time, the final effect could be the same.”

So why are studies like this not regularly performed on humans to remove nagging doubt about their relevance? One reason is the prohibitive cost. Another, perhaps more significant hurdle, is that it is unethical to test chemical safety on human subjects. This obviously makes for great regulatory challenges in unequivocally proving human safety.  So, how are the majority of chemicals released onto the market tested for safety? Animals. And so, the argument that animal studies are not sufficient to demonstrate plausible toxicity in humans is absurd, given that the toxicological risk assessments used to justify releasing chemicas like sucralose into the human food supply are invariably based on animal studies. In fact, these animal studies are used to determine an “acceptable level of harm” by extrapolating from them to find the dose that would not cause overt morbidity in a human.  The notion, however, that the dose makes the poison, has been completely undermined, given research on petrochemicals, low-dose radiation, nanoparticles, and other non-linear dose responses observed following exposure to extremely low concentrations of toxicants, whose effects are amplifed because they mimic hormones (endocrine disruptors) or cause DNA damage and subsequent cellular transformation into cancer instead of inducing cell death (apoptosis). The most recent classical example of this is the finding that glyphosate, the main in the herbicide Roundup, exhibits estrogenic/carcinogenic/endocrine disruptive properties in the parts-per-trillion range.

Sucralose: A Sweetener or Pesticide?

Another highly concerning observation was that sucralose’s effects are similar to those observed with other organochlorine chemicals in its class, which include dangerous pesticides.

“[T]he pattern of HPT axis components—decreased TPO activity, TSH, T4, and T3 plasma concentrations together with increased free-to-total TH ratios in the group on the diet with sucralose—resembles some effects evoked by organochlorine compounds documented in human and animal studies. The inverse relationships between plasma levels of chloroorganic compounds and TSH or the thyroid hormone have been observed [31–35]. The association between high levels of fT4 and the consumption of fish exposed to organochlorinated xenobiotics was found in adults from a certain area in East Slovakia [36]. This could be explained by the binding of chloroorganic compounds residues to transthyretin [37]. In the light of these parallels, our results could raise questions about the physiological inertness of sucralose.”

In a previous article, we reported on sucralose’s relationship to organochlorine compounds like DDT, and how both compounds have the potential of accumulating in the body and causing adverse health effects:

“The makers of sucralose/Splenda argue that this “remarkably stable” chemical passes unchanged into the urine and feces, when in fact, up to 11% to 27% is absorbed into the body (FDA, 1999). In fact, the varying degrees to which sucralose is absorbed is used as a marker for gut and intestinal permeability to determine certain disease states. Once absorbed, some portion of this chlorocarbon accumulates in the body (between 1.6% to 12.2%). What effects will these accumulated chemicals have? According to James Bowen, M.D:

“Any chlorocarbons not directly excreted from the body intact can cause immense damage to the processes of human metabolism and, eventually, our internal organs. The liver is a detoxification organ which deals with ingested poisons. Chlorocarbons damage the hepatocytes, the liver’s metabolic cells, and destroy them. In test animals Splenda produced swollen livers, as do all chlorocarbon poisons, and also calcified the kidneys of test animals in toxicity studies.”

The Body Perceives Splenda To Be Toxic

The stiudy also noted that previous researchers have doubted the safety of sucralose based on observations that sucralose intake alters expression of both  “rat intestinal P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and cytochrome P-450 isozymes, which are key components of the detoxification system in first-pass drug metabolism [38].” In other words, sucralose induced responses in the body consistent with the perception that it was doing physical harm, and needed to be removed from the body in the way other toxicants are handled.

Changes also observed consistent with sucralose as a toxicant are: “Alterations in beneficial intestinal microflora and epithelial border function after long-term sucralose ingestion were also recorded [38, 39].”

The researchers conjecture that sucralose’s adverse effects on the thyorid axis would be reflected in “thyroid hisopathology,” i.e. thyroid lesions/tumnors. Could this be one of the causes behind the mysterious global uptick in thyroid cancer diagnoses?

Ditch The Chemicals

This study leaves far more questions than answers. First, why are regulators turning a blind eye to the accumulating body of research indicating that sucralose is a highly toxic chemical whose safety has not be established?  Second, why would anyone risk exposing themselves to a chemical when the evidence indicates that artificial sweeteners of all kinds promote weight gain, and increase appetitde — the last two things those who wish to lose weight, or “cut down on sugar” want?

Thankfully we live in an age where research like this is now directly available online, the moment it is published. With greater access to information, we can all better exercise informed consent and take control of our health. We are also to better assess the health benefits of natural substances that render the use of synthetic ones unnecessary, such as honey, stevia, and xylitol. Use the GreenMedInfo.com Research Dashboard to learn more about these alternatives.

Read More At: GreenMedInfo.com
______________________________________________________________
© [January 6, 2017] GreenMedInfo LLC. This work is reproduced and distributed with the permission of GreenMedInfo LLC. Want to learn more from GreenMedInfo? Sign up for the newsletter here http://www.greenmedinfo.com/greenmed/newsletter.

What’s the Harm in Taking an Antidepressant?

Source: KellyBroganMD.com
Dr. Kelly Brogan M.D.
November 8, 2016

what's-the-harm

We know that all drugs have side effects. That’s just part of the deal right? But is it really possible that an antidepressant can cause a sane person to act like a cold-blooded criminal?

I imagined my audience would be wondering as much as I arrived to an unseasonably chilly day at King’s College in London. I was there to share what I have learned about the medications that I so dutifully and faithfully prescribed during the early part of my career, and also about the deep potential for healing depression in simple, safe ways, according to the latest science.

The day before my flight, I had received an email from a man who I would choose to invite on stage with me that day. His name is David Carmichael and he wrote:

“I took the life of my 11-year-old son Ian on July 31, 2004 in a Paxil-induced state of psychosis and was charged with first degree murder. I was judged to be “not criminally responsible on account of a mental disorder” in September 2005 and received an absolute discharge from the forensic psychiatric system (in Ontario, Canada) in December 2009. I’ve been off all prescription drugs since September 2010. Prior to our family tragedy, I was a physical active sports consultant with no history of violence or mental illness.”

He told an audience of clinicians and patients, that day, about how it is that a normal citizen, prescribed a seemingly safe medication for work-related stress, goes on to commit a heinous act of violence against his beloved child. This academic classroom was heaving with grief when he finished his description of events.

This must be rare, right? Totally anomalous?

Wrong.

It has become my contention that the Russian Roulette that is played with each new prescription of psychotropic medication violates the physician’s most primal tenet – first do no harm – and does so in the absence of anything approximating informed consent.

Violence as a Side Effect?

Thankfully, we are often given multiple chances to wake up to a greater truth. It’s becoming easier than ever. With grassroots platforms like madinamerica.com, the information is out there, when you are ready to look beyond main stream media to what the real victims are claiming.

The truth about antidepressants and violence is also in the most recently published literature, including a critical review, hot off the press, by Carvalho et al where the authors dive into the research on the supposed safety of SSRIs and SNRIs. In this document, they present an evidence-based horror menagerie of ways in which a simple antidepressant can derail your life if it doesn’t take it. Leaving patients with new medical diagnoses, antidepressants prescribed often for difficult transitions in life like divorces and deaths, carry documented risks that your doctor cannot possibly tell you about because if they knew of them, they would put down their prescription pad immediately.

Let’s take a tour. Neatly summarized here, the adverse effects of antidepressants can sound like that droning voice in TV ads that we are inured to because we have been told these “side effects are rare, and outweighed by the benefits.”

But the benefits are shockingly limited so, let’s take a closer look at those side effects…

harm image

The Risks That Made Me Quit Prescribing

Having always represented antidepressants as safe and effective to my patients, I put down my prescription pad after learning 3 facts about psychiatric medications:

  • They result in worse long-term outcomes [1]
  • They are debilitatingly habit forming [2] [3] [4]
  • They cause unpredictable violence [5] [6]

These insights were apparently just the tip of the iceberg. Several years into the horror stories of patient experiences and new relationships with grassroots activists, I am left wondering. What on earth are these meds? How could biochemistry have ever manifested molecules capable of derailing, distorting, and suppressing the human experience to this extent?

With more unknowns than knowns at this point, the signal of harm is growing and patient alignment with this model of care, diminishing.

I pulled some choice phrases from the paper for your further enlightenment below but suffice it to say that many of these side effects are major gamechanging problems if not life-ending tragedies that render the placebo-level performance of these medications totally unacceptable.

Gut disturbance: “Some of the most frequently reported side effects associated with the use of SSRIs and serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) include nausea, diarrhea, dyspepsia, GI bleeding and abdominal pain.”

Liver toxicity: “Two main mechanisms may be involved in antidepressant- induced liver toxicity, namely a metabolic component and/or an immuno-allergic pathway. A hypersensitivity syndrome with fever and rash as clinical manifestations, as well as with autoantibodies and eosinophilia, and a short latency period (1–6 weeks) point to a predominantly immunoallergic pathophysiological mechanism, whereas a lack of hypersensitivity syndrome and a longer latency period (i.e. 1 month to 1 year) points to an idiosyncratic metabolic mechanism.”

Weight gain: “Notwithstanding the complexity of the clinical scenario, compelling evidence indicates that the use of most antidepressants may increase weight in a significant proportion of patients.”

Heart problems: “SSRIs and SNRIs may promote a decrement in heart rate variability (HRV). Although the impact of the effects of antidepressants on HRV remains to be established, data indicate that a lower HRV is a significant predictor of incident cardiovascular events.”

Urinary problems: “SSRIs can cause urinary retention by acting on central micturition pathways. Serotonin may increase the central sympathetic outflow leading to urinary storage, and at the same time inhibits parasympathetic flow, which affects voiding.”

Sexual dysfunction: “…a significant body of data shows that antidepressants may differentially affect sexual function in multiple aspects, leading to reductions in libido, arousal dysfunction (erection in males and vaginal lubrication in females) and orgasmic dysfunctions.”

Salt imbalance: “The mechanisms of SSRI-induced hyponatremia remain incompletely elucidated, but these agents can act by either increasing the release of antidiuretic hormone (ADH) or increasing the sensitivity to ADH resulting in a clinical picture similar to the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of ADH.”

Osteoporosis/Bone weakening: “The use of SSRIs has been associated with a reduction in bone mineral density (BMD) and a consistent higher risk of fractures.”

Bleeding: “All serotonergic antidepressants have been associated with an increased risk of bleeding. The most likely mechanism responsible for these adverse reactions is a reduction of serotonin reuptake by platelets, although other mechanisms have also been implicated.”

Nervous system dysfunction: “All kinds of EPS [extrapyramidal symptoms] are seen in patients taking antidepressants, but akathisia appears to be the most common presentation followed by dystonic reactions, parkinsonian movements and tardive dyskinesia…Headache was one of the most common side effects associated with the use of antidepressants in a large retrospective cohort of adolescents and adults.”

Sweating: “Most studies indicate that approximately 10% of patients on SSRIs may develop excessive sweating, although the incidence may be higher for paroxetine.”

Sleep disturbances: “The SSRIs and venlafaxine are associated with increased REM sleep latency and a reduction in the overall time spent in the REM phase while sleeping.”

Mood changes: “Many patients taking SSRIs have reported experiencing emotional blunting. They often describe their emotions as being ‘damped down’ or ‘toned down’, while some patients refer to a feeling of being in ‘limbo’ and just ‘not caring’ about issues that were significant to them before…Furthermore, an activation syndrome in which patients taking antidepressants may experience anxiety, agitation, panic attacks, insomnia, irritability, hostility, aggressiveness and impulsivity in the first 3 months of treatment may ensue.”

Suicidality: “The incidence of suicide and attempted suicide has been a frequently underreported adverse outcome across antidepressant RCTs.”

Overdose toxicity: “Patients with MDD are at increased risk of suicide and overdosing of prescribed medications is a common method used to attempted suicide.”

Withdrawal Syndrome: “These symptoms include flu-like symptoms, tremors, tachycardia, shock-like sensations, paresthesia, myalgia, tinnitus, neuralgia, ataxia, vertigo, sexual dysfunction, sleep disturbances, vivid dreams, nausea vomiting, diarrhea, worsening anxiety and mood Instability.”

Eye disease: “A subset of patients taking SSRIs reports nonspecific visual disturbances…SSRIs may increase intraocular pressure and lead to the emergence of angle-closure glaucoma…A nested case-control study found a higher likelihood of cataracts after exposure to newer generation antidepressants.”

Hormonal imbalance: “Long-standing increases in peripheral prolactin levels are occasionally observed in patients using ADs, including SSRIs [208] ; hyperprolactinemia may have deleterious health consequences (e.g. a decrease in BMD [bone mineral density] and hypogonadism).”

Pregnancy/Breastfeeding risk: “Most of the data describing the presence of birth defects associated with SSRI use have been based on observational studies and drug registries. Therefore, the clinical significance of these data is questionable.”

Cancer risk: “Preclinical studies have found that antidepressants can increase the growth of fibrosarcomas and melanomas, and may also promote mammary carcinogenesis.”

Whew! Now that’s depressing. And why don’t you know about these? Because your doctor doesn’t. I recently learned of a patient who was prescribed an antidepressant simultaneous to an antibiotic “just in case the antibiotic caused depression or mood changes”. We are trained to treat these medications as a “why not” application of pharmacology, and the truth is that, as the authors state:

the history of toxicology reminds us vividly of the lag that often occurs between the first approval of a drug for use in humans and the recognition of certain adverse events from that drug.”

Taking these risks seems all the more unecessary with the robust outcomes of lifestyle medicine – multimodal, multi-tier interventions that are low cost, immediately available, and side effect free. As the authors conclude:

The findings of this review suggest that long-term treatment with new generation ADs should be avoided if alternative treatments are available.”

I would have to agree and affirm that these “alternative” treatments are indeed available. These treatments offer not only resolution of symptoms and elimination/avoidance of meds, but an entirely new experience of self. This is not about getting “back to normal,” it’s about integration, evolution, and vitality. I’ve been working for several years to make self-healing toolkits available to everyone considering an antidepressant or looking to come off of one for less than the price of one doctor visit. Check it out!

[1] http://www.power2u.org/downloads/AnatomyofanEpidemic-SummaryofFindings-Whitaker.pdf
[2] https://www.karger.com/Article/FullText/371865
[3] http://www.madinamerica.com/psychiatric-drug-withdrawal/#/home/
[4] http://kellybroganmd.com/stop-madness-coming-psych-meds/
[5] http://kellybroganmd.com/homicide-and-the-ssri-alibi/

Read More At: KellyBroganMD.com

_______________________________________________________________
© Kelly Brogan MD. This work is reproduced and distributed with the permission of Kelly Brogan MD. For more articles, sign up for the newsletter at kellybroganmd.com.

_______________________________________________________________

Kelly Brogan, MD

Kelly Brogan, M.D. is a Manhattan-based holistic women’s health psychiatrist, author of the New York Times bestselling book, A Mind of Your Own, and co-editor of the landmark textbook, Integrative Therapies for Depression. She completed her psychiatric training and fellowship at NYU Medical Center after graduating from Cornell University Medical College, and has a B.S. from MIT in Systems Neuroscience. View full bio. Want to share this article on your own blog? View our reposting guidelines.

The Herbal Remedy EVERYONE Should Know About: Turmeric Golden Honey Can Fight Weight Gain, Relieve Pain & Combat Inflammation

Turmeric
Source: NaturalNews.com
Sarah Landers
August 15, 2016

You might have heard about the many health benefits of turmeric – or maybe you still think of this popular spice as only belonging in your spice rack. Either way, you may be surprised to find out that a simple combination of turmeric and honey (known as “golden honey”) is an extremely useful natural remedy, as recently reported by Natural News.

Turmeric has anti-inflammatory and anti-carcinogenic properties that make it very good for your health. It is also able to destroy bacteria that cause diseases, aiding your body’s natural defense system. Combine turmeric with honey – which has its own antibacterial properties – and you have a pretty strong natural remedy. In fact, according to Healthy and Natural World, turmeric golden honey is considered to be the strongest natural antibiotic.

How to make this remedy

Combine 3.5oz of raw organic honey with one tablespoon of turmeric powder and mix well. Store in a sealable glass container.

As soon as you exhibit the first symptoms of cold or flu, start to take the remedy in the following quantities:

  • On day one, take half a teaspoon every hour.
  • On day two, take half a teaspoon every two hours.
  • On day three, take half a teaspoon three times a day.

Turmeric and weight control

Turmeric actually melts away body fat, according to research from Tufts University in Boston. Scientists discovered that curcumin – which is the active ingredient in turmeric – reduced weight gain and total body fat in mice. Study authors explained: “By diminishing the sediment of fat, relaxing the lymphatic return, and refraining the apoptosis of beta cells, the curcumin might significantly decrease the level of insulin resistance and leptin resistance caused by the high fat diet.”

Turmeric and pain relief

According to Bel Marra Health, turmeric is actually a natural pain reliever – again thanks to its powerful active ingredient, curcumin. Its antioxidant properties help to get rid of free radicals before they can do any damage, and also combat inflammation brought on by osteoarthritis, making turmeric a natural remedy for pain.

Turmeric and inflammation

Turmeric is competitively effective when compared with a class of steroid medications known as corticosteroids which are used to manage chronic inflammation. Curcumin and resveratrol (also found in turmeric) can be helpful in the fight against tumor cells, by reducing their propensity to spread to other parts of the body, and reducing their ability to inflame local regions.

Various turmeric studies have been carried out using injectable forms of the spice – which is more bioaccessible than turmeric taken orally. According to Natural Health 365, researchers believe that curcumin has chemopreventive properties, helping it to combat cancers of the digestive tract, skin and mouth in animal studies. Curcumin not only triggers the activity of natural carcinogenic-detoxifying enzymes, but it also inhibits cancer calls from growing and spreading.

Spicy tropical smoothies

Since turmeric is one of the best natural anti-inflammatories you can consume, it is worth incorporating it into your diet on a regular basis. Check out the following amazing recipe for a spicy tropical smoothie; simply blend these ingredients together:

  • 1 cup of coconut milk
  • 1/2 cup of pineapple chunks
  • 1 banana
  • 1/2 teaspoon of turmeric
  • 1/4 teaspoon of freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tsp of honey or maple syrup

Read More At: NaturalNews.com

Sources include:

Blogs.NaturalNews.com

NaturalHealth365.com

BelMarraHealth.com

NaturalNews.com

HealthyAndNaturalWorld.com

Science.NaturalNews.com

Microbial Diversity & Weight Gain

Source: DavidPerlmutterMD
Dr. David Perlmutter
June 20, 2016

A new study in laboratory animals inoculated with human gut microbes shows how desperately important dietary prebiotic fiber is, in terms of maintaining microbial diversity. Low levels of prebiotic fiber lead to loss of diversity, which, in humans, is associated with a variety of diseases, including diabetes and autoimmune conditions. The study further demonstrates that while introduction of prebiotic fiber does restore the diversity to some degree, subsequent generations of these laboratory animals are less able to recover their diversity, with some species of gut organisms actually becoming extinct.

Find the study here: http://www.drperlmutter.com/study/die…

Is Candida A Main Cause of These Conditions?

Source: iHealthTube.com
Dr. Jacob Teitelbaum
May 22, 2016

Autoimmune conditions seem to be on the rise. Find out what Dr. Jacob Teitelbaum says is one of the causes and is in general, a ‘big problem’. He explains what this infection is and how he generally goes about treating it. Find out how candida can be a main cause of so many health conditions