It Begins With Information | #BigFood #Health

It Begins With Information

Source: GreenMedInfo.com
Charles Eisenstein
April 19, 2017

When I first discovered the world of holistic health and nutrition, and saw the ignorance from whence I had come, I thought my health problems would be gone forever. It would be easy — all I needed to do was to implement the information I was discovering.

This was the formula I’d learned in school. Find the answer, and the problem is solved. Do what you are told. I’d been told the wrong information, but now I’d discovered the right.

Perhaps the reader has also experienced that rush of excitement, and that fresh surge of motivation that follows it. Finally, the answer! It’s blue-green algae! Lions mane mushrooms! Far infrared sauna! Vitamin D supplementation! Structured water! Negative ions! Adaptogenic herbs! High-intensity short duration exercise! Alkalizing the blood! Omega-3 fatty acids! Veganism. Paleo. Raw. Fasting….

Yes, it wasn’t long before I encountered a problem: Information overload. No one can implement all of these, even if they didn’t sometimes contradict each other (vegan and paleo for instance). At some point one wonders, how many “must have” supplements must I have? A rebelliousness sets in: it isn’t supposed to be so complicated. Should a person have to sift through numerous scientific articles just to be healthy? (Or trust someone to do it for them?) How do we know which expert to trust? In a more innocent time, we trusted the (supposedly) impartial self-correcting mechanisms of scientific publishing. When the flaws in that system are exposed — the influence of money and politics, the quashing of dissent, the institutionalized confirmation bias — then what is left? Whom do we trust, when the old authorities are discredited and so many new ones are vying for our attention, many with a product to sell?

The response I’ve worked with for fifteen years has been to develop inner authority as a way to cut through the fog of so many dubious and contradictory outer authorities. Inner authority is based on sensitivity to, and trust in, the communication coming from the body. That is easier said than done in an age of distraction, in an age of dissociation from the body, and in a society that constantly asks us to surrender our sovereignty to medical, educational, and other authorities. The formula for doing it right that I learned in school — to find the answers out there — is itself part of the problem.

To establish inner authority means to learn to distinguish authentic appetites from desires that come from displaced needs. Needs are displaced when the the thing we really want, the thing that meets the need, is unavailable, whether through circumstance, lack of knowledge, or emotional blockage. The unmet need could be for something like intimacy, meaning, connection to nature, fulfilling work, or adventure. An unmet need generates both discomfort and desire, and that desire often gets channeled onto something — such as junk food, overeating, alcohol, or another addiction — that doesn’t meet the actual need. For example, someone who lacks deep, unconditional self-acceptance might be compelled to frequently give themselves a treat to confirm (on an unconscious level), “Yes, I am a good girl. I am loved.” Or maybe you eat because you are lonely. Or snacking offers a respite from a lite that is just a little intolerable.

This leads to a second reason why finding correct information may only be a first step: Just because you know what to do doesn’t mean you will actually do it. People bring things into their bodies — and their lives — all the time that they know are not good for them. We do things that we have vowed to abstain from, and fail to do what we’ve promised ourselves. Why?

Until we can resolve this question, having the right information will not be enough. Displaced needs explain a lot of it. if the real need is for intimacy, no amount of sugar — which gives a momentary experience of something like intimacy, and momentary relief from the discomfort of it — will be enough to meet that need. You can eat it and eat it, and blame yourself for your weak willpower, but actually it is just that you are trying to meet a need. Maybe the reason it is unmet is that the marriage has become stagnant and real communication has broken down. Maybe secrets and pretenses are in the way of true intimacy. Changing your diet or switching supplements is unlikely to change that. But then maybe you have a breakthrough in your relationship, and voila — the craving goes away. Until then, the sugar is helping to maintain the status quo.

Various addictions usually fit this pattern. Coffee as a substitute for the natural motivation of following a life purpose. Gambling as a substitute for taking bold risks. News addiction as a substitute for a feeling of power and agency. I’m grossly generalizing and simplifying here, but I think you get the idea. You cannot make an addict stop using by telling him that it’s “bad for you.” You cannot make yourself stop that way either. The information is not enough, and neither is the kind of willpower that comes through a regime of threats and incentives.

How then can we identify and meet the displaced needs? How can we know when a food or a practice or a supplement is meeting a real need? And how can we align desire and discipline so that we can choose beneficial things effortlessly, and effortlessly avoid that which harms? The answer to all three of these questions comes from the same fundamental practice. Put simply, the answer is available through the power of attention directed toward the body and its sensory experience. When we can fully receive and integrate the experience of taking something into the body (or into life), then we know it on a body level; we know what it is and what it is not. Then it take no more willpower to decline harmful foods than it does to stop from jamming your thumb into your eye. Because you know, on a body level, that it hurts.

To establish this kind of direct feedback, so that harmful things become repellent and helpful things become attractive, requires integrating body responses over time. It also requires unlearning a lot of habits that seem totally normal in our culture, and bringing into consciousness the unconscious ways in which we avoid feeling.

I give a fuller description of this process in my online course, Dietary Transformation from the Inside Out, including meditations and take-home practices to reprogram new habits over a period of a few weeks. The goal is to establish a kind of ease and freedom, a release of struggle, an aligning of health and pleasure, and a trust in inner authority.

I hope I have not unduly simplified a complex issue in this brief article. Another crucial piece of the puzzle include the ways our culture deadens us to subtle body information and how to recover sensitivity to it. Even more important, perhaps, is the realization that a state of diet is a state of being — something must shift before a person is ready to inhabit a higher level of vitality. If the readiness is there, new health habits are easy to adopt. if it is not, then the energy coming from the miracle supplement or superfood or yoga practice will just be consumed by a correspondingly intensified addictive habit. Maybe you’ll feel great so you’ll drink more to bring you down to an energy level that fits your life right now.

Truly, the journey toward better health leaves no aspect of life untouched.

Of course, none of this means that information from researchers and experts is useless. It is in fact extremely valuable, because it gives the techniques I describe something to operate on. It opens up a new menu of possibilities on which to exercise inner authority.

Furthermore, there is a natural complementarity between the inner, attention-based process I’ve mentioned and the world of natural or holistic health. We sense a kinship between them, because both are part of a transition from a belief system in which well-being comes through the domination or conquest of nature, to one in which nature is our ally and teacher. Both also affirm that health is not a matter of fighting the body — neither imposing pharmaceutical control over it, nor imposing willpower over it based on mental knowledge. Holistic health isn’t about substituting one body of expert opinion for another. It is about reclaiming our power through a return to nature.

Read More At: GreenMedInfo.com

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Vitamin D may be your best defense against respiratory infections, new science finds

Image: Vitamin D may be your best defense against respiratory infections, new science finds
Source: NaturalNews.com
Earl Garcia
April 24, 2017

Vitamin D intake may help keep common colds and flu at bay, British researchers found. Various studies have previously established that vitamin D may help reduce the risk of respiratory infections, and the recent analysis further emphasizes the vitamin’s role in boosting the immune system. To test this, researchers at the Queen Mary University of London pooled data from 25 separate trials with a total cohort population of 11,321 participants.

The research team found that vitamin D supplementation provided a modest protective effect against respiratory infections. Lead researcher Dr. Adrian Martineau said vitamin D supplements helped reduce the risk of developing respiratory illnesses such as colds and flu by 10 percent. Participants suffering vitamin D deficiency were shown to benefit more from supplementation.

According to researchers, vitamin D supplementation may help prevent respiratory infection in one out of 33 individuals. In contrast, flu vaccination may prevent infection in one out of 40 individuals. This suggests that vitamin D supplementation could be a more ideal preventive against respiratory conditions. The findings were published in the British Medical Journal.

Vitamin D’s protective effects seen in more studies

Vitamin D supplementation helped reduce respiratory infections in elderly population, according to a 2016 study. As part of the study, researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus examined 107 patients with an average age of 84 years old. The patients were given either higher monthly vitamin D doses or lower daily vitamin D doses. The study revealed that patients who had higher doses exhibited a 40 percent reduction in acute respiratory diseases after a year. However, researchers stressed that the findings warrant further research.

“This finding requires a confirmatory trial…This is a potentially life-saving discovery. There is very little in a doctor’s arsenal to battle ARI, especially since most are viral infections where antibiotics don’t work. But vitamin D seems able to potentially prevent these infections. If our results are confirmed by a larger trial, high dose vitamin D, ideally using daily dosing to minimize fall risk, has the potential for substantial public health benefit through ARI prevention for the large and growing population of long term care residents,” wrote lead author Dr. Adit Ginde in ScienceDaily.com. The finding were published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Another study revealed that higher vitamin D intake may cut the risk of respiratory tract infections. To carry out the study, researchers examined 140 volunteers who were given either vitamin D supplements or placebo. The researchers found that patients in the vitamin D group had a 25 percent decrease in respiratory tract infections at the end of the study period compared with those in the placebo group. The research team also found that patients who took vitamin D supplements reduced their antibiotic use by nearly 50 percent.

“Our research can have important implications for patients with recurrent infections or a compromised immune defense, such as a lack of antibodies, and can also help to prevent the emerging resistance to antibiotics that come from overuse. On the other hand, there doesn’t seem to be anything to support the idea that vitamin D would help otherwise healthy people with normal, temporary respiratory tract infections,” said researcher Dr. Peter Bergman in MedicalNewsToday.com. The results appeared in the journal BMJ Open.

A small study published in 2010 also revealed that vitamin D supplementation helped reduce the incidence of influenza A in children. To assess this, Japanese researchers examined more than 3oo children and found that the incidence of influenza-A infection was only 10.8 percent in those who took vitamin D supplements, compared with 18.6 percent in the control group. The findings were published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Read More At: NaturalNews.com

Sources include: 

NaturalHealth365.com

BBC.com

NPR.org

ScienceDaily.com

MedicalNewsToday.com

ScienceNews.org

WARNING: Sugar destroys your body’s ability to absorb these 5 essential nutrients

Image: WARNING: Sugar destroys your body’s ability to absorb these 5 essential nutrients
Source: NaturalNews.com
Russel Davis
March 24, 2017

The sugar industry in the U.S. thrives at a whopping $100 billion in annual revenue. That is because Americans consume an average of 150 lbs of sugar  per year. Most people are aware of the adverse effects of excessive sugar consumption such as obesity, diabetes, and cancer. However, what is known as well-known is that high sugar intake leads to nutrient deficiency. Excessive sugar intake was shown to deplete and reduce the absorption of essential vitamins and minerals needed by the body.

High sugar intake robs the body of essential nutrients

The human body can synthesize vitamin C on its own, but eating too much sugar limits the beneficial effects of the vitamin. Sugar and vitamin C use the same transporters to reach the cells. More sugar in the blood stream means more competition for vitamin C absorption. Increased glucose levels appear to inhibit vitamin C from entering the cells, thereby resulting in limited vitamin absorption. Sugar-induced vitamin C deficiency may result in suppressed tissue regeneration and decreased immune function.

Vitamin D, another important nutrient, can also fall prey to sugar’s unwanted effects. Sugar promotes the expression of enzymes that degrade vitamin D, while simultaneously decreasing enzymes needed to synthesize the vitamin. This then results in vitamin D deficiency. Low vitamin levels were tied to various health conditions such as autoimmunity, dementia, and infection as well as inflammation and certain types of cancer. Vitamin D deficiency was more common in regions with the least amount of sunlight.

Excessive sugar intake results in high blood sugar levels and increased insulin rates. In turn, higher blood sugar and insulin levels promote magnesium excretion by the kidneys, thereby inhibiting tubular reabsorption of the mineral. This prompts the body to use up its magnesium reserves. Magnesium is essential in certain body functions such as blood sugar control, muscle and nerve regulation, and bone building. Excreting this essential mineral from the body can lead to adverse health effects.

Eating too much sugar greatly affects chromium absorption in the body. Similar to magnesium, sugar triggers chromium deficiency by prompting the body to excrete the essential mineral. One study revealed that eating a diet containing 35% sugar leads to a 10% increase in chromium excretion. Chromium is a key mineral the promotes blood glucose control, insulin binding, and macronutient metabolism. Chromium deficiency leads to high blood sugar levels and poor glucose tolerance.

Calcium is vital for skeletal health, blood clotting, and electrolyte balance. Vitamin D expedites calcium absorption in the body by regulating calcium transport in the small intestine. Excessive sugar intake was shown to negatively affect vitamin D absorption, which in turn causes a ripple effect to the body’s calcium absorption. Sugar was also shown to promote calcium excretion by inhibiting tubular reabsorption by the kidneys. Low calcium levels result in unwanted health conditions.

Sweet killer: The nasty effects of high sugar intake on the body

People are becoming more aware of the undesirable health consequences of excessive sugar intake through extensive research and information dissemination. Sugar is associated with a host of other damaging reactions.  To wit: eating too much sugar leads to suppressed immune function and triggers hyperactivity in children. It may lead to kidney damage, increased blood acidity, and advanced aging.

Tooth decay, arthritis, asthma, as well as digestive disorders and candida albicans (a fungus that causes yeast infections) are also among the results of excessive sugar intake. Consuming high amounts of sugar can result in atherosclerosis, eczema, asthma, depression, and free radical formation. Decreased cardiac blood flow, brittle tendons and increased liver and kidney sizes were also among the most hazardous effects of sugar.

Follow more news on sugar and other sweeteners at Sweeteners.news.

Read more At: NaturalNews.com

Sources:

NaturalHealth365.com

ThePaleoMom.com

TheDoctorWithin.com

Is Your Doctor Profiting Off Kids’ Vaccines!? – You NEED To Listen To This

Source: iHealthTube.com
January 20, 2017

Is your pediatrician working on a vaccine commission? Dr. Anthony DeMaria discusses recent research that should have you asking questions about the vaccine program in this country! Find out what he tells patients and what he’s seen and researched when it comes to vaccines, including flu shots!

You’ll Be Shocked at How Much Vitamin D Regulates in the Body!

Source: iHealthTube.com
January 15, 2017

Most of us know that vitamin D is important to us in many ways. We may just not know how many! Dr. Patrick Quillin discusses the importance of vitamin D and how many things it regulates in the body. It could certainly be behind many health conditions we face!

Natural Health News Looks at Vitamin D/Cancer Connection

Source: iHealthTube.com
November 10, 2016

This weeks headlines in natural news takes a look at the dangers of food additives, the connection between vitamin D and bladder cancer as well as delaying prostate cancer treatments.

iHealthTube Natural Health News for Nov. 2

Source: iHealthTube.com
November 2, 2016

Get the latest from the natural health world this week! Learn about amazing new benefits with resveratrol, as well as glucosamine. Also find out what one recent study indicated when it comes to kids and vitamin D levels