U.S. FDA FINALLY Shamed into Testing for Monsanto’s Glyphosate Herbicide in Food

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Source: NaturalSociety.com
Christina Sarich
February 19, 2016

Sure, consumers are concerned about eating glyphosate. Wouldn’t you be? If 75% of air and rain samples tested contain glyphosate, it is highly likely that the ‘probable’ human carcinogen is also in our food supply. Now that the World Health Organization is calling a spade a spade, it appears the US Food and Drug Administration is forced to start testing food for glyphosate. [1]

The American public has been practically begging the agency to stop using the people as guinea pigs with a likely carcinogen. But only after the US Government Accountability Office (GAO) rebuked the FDA for failing to conduct assessments and failing to disclose risks to the public is the agency actually going to do something about it…or will it?

 This is the very same agency which approved GMO salmon, initially without a label, and declared the GMO fish just as safe as non-GMO varieties.

The GAO says that it found multiple areas of fault in the FDA’s pesticide residue testing program, specifically citing a failure to test for glyphosate.

Continue Reading At: NaturalSociety.com

The World According to Monsanto

There’s nothing they are leaving untouched: the mustard, the okra, the bringe oil, the rice, the cauliflower. Once they have established the norm: that seed can be owned as their property, royalties can be collected. We will depend on them for every seed we grow of every crop we grow. If they control seed, they control food, they know it — it’s strategic. It’s more powerful than bombs. It’s more powerful than guns. This is the best way to control the populations of the world. The story starts in the White House, where Monsanto often got its way by exerting disproportionate influence over policymakers via the “revolving door”. One example is Michael Taylor, who worked for Monsanto as an attorney before being appointed as deputy commissioner of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1991. While at the FDA, the authority that deals with all US food approvals, Taylor made crucial decisions that led to the approval of GE foods and crops. Then he returned to Monsanto, becoming the company’s vice president for public policy.

Thanks to these intimate links between Monsanto and government agencies, the US adopted GE foods and crops without proper testing, without consumer labeling and in spite of serious questions hanging over their safety. Not coincidentally, Monsanto supplies 90 percent of the GE seeds used by the US market. Monsanto’s long arm stretched so far that, in the early nineties, the US Food and Drugs Agency even ignored warnings of their own scientists, who were cautioning that GE crops could cause negative health effects. Other tactics the company uses to stifle concerns about their products include misleading advertising, bribery and concealing scientific evidence.