Hundreds Of Cancer-Causing Chemicals Detected In American’s Blood, Urine & Hair, Says Environmental Watchdog Group

Cancer chemicals
Source: NaturalNews.com
Jonathan Benson
June 22, 2016

Concerns about the human health effects of perpetual exposure to environmental toxins often get dismissed or ignored by health authorities on the grounds that such chemicals don’t stick around inside the body long enough to cause problems. But a new report by the Environmental Working Group (EWG) – the first of its kind – suggests quite the opposite, and could help explain why rates of cancer and other chronic diseases continue to skyrocket in the developed world.

Researchers from the respected environmental watchdog group spent upwards of a year poring through data compiled from more than 1,000 biomonitoring studies, as well as other research published by leading government agencies and independent scientists, and came to some shocking conclusions. They found that as many as 420 unique chemicals known or suspected to cause cancer, are now being detected in human blood, urine, hair and other tissue samples, demonstrating not only that carcinogens are everywhere, but that they’re also permeating our bodies at an alarming rate.

The bulk of existing cancer research focuses almost exclusively on tobacco, alcohol and sun exposure as the alleged primary causes of cancer, at the exclusion of the literally thousands of chemicals that have been scientifically shown to cause cancer. Even the World Health Organization (WHO) agrees that 20 percent of cancers – or one in five cases – are a result of chemical and/or environmental exposure, not cigarettes, booze and ultraviolet rays.

Reinforcing other ongoing research of a similar nature, like that of the Halifax Project – a collaboration of more than 300 scientists from around the world who are investigating the cancer-causing effects of common chemicals – the new EWG findings are sure to raise some eyebrows within the realm of public health. At the very least, what this research shows is that not nearly enough investigation has taken place with regard to chemical safety, and that the general public faces unknown risks from this lack of proper scrutiny.

“The presence of a toxic chemical in our bodies does not necessarily mean it will cause harm, but this report details the astounding number of carcinogens we are exposed to in almost every part of life that are building up in our systems,” stated Curt DellaValle, author of the report and a senior scientist at EWG.

“At any given time some people may harbor dozens or hundreds of cancer-causing chemicals. This troubling truth underscores the need for greater awareness of our everyday exposure to chemicals and how to avoid them.”

Compounded toxicity, an often overlooked aspect of carcinogenic exposure

Another issue addressed by the report is the lack of safety research on chemicals in combination with one another. The combined toxicity of multiple chemicals in tandem – a common occurrence in many consumer products – is a major unknown when it comes to long-term health effects, especially in developing unborn children still inside their mothers’ wombs.

“Many of the carcinogens this study documents in people find their way into our bodies through food, air, water and consumer products every day. Dozens of them show up in human umbilical cord blood—which means Americans are exposed to carcinogens before they’ve left the womb,” says EWG president, Ken Cook.

“We should focus on preventing cancer by preventing human exposure to these chemicals.”

As we’ve reported in the past, the federal Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) in its current form lacks the necessary regulatory teeth required to accurately assess the safety of chemicals, especially the effects of combined chemical exposure. As it stands, thousands of chemicals have been “grandfathered” into use without having been properly safety tested by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), a direct result of TSCA’s failed guidelines.

Read More At: NaturalNews.com

Monsanto’s Cancerous Glyphosate Is Inside Everything – Blood, Urine, Air, Water & More

Monsanto2

Source: Mercola.com
Dr. Mercola
March 22, 2016

Glyphosate, the active ingredient in Monsanto’s Roundup herbicide, recently earned the ominous title of the most heavily-used agricultural chemical of all time.1

In fact, an analysis showed that farmers sprayed enough glyphosate in 2014 to apply 0.8 pounds of the chemical to every acre of cultivated cropland in the U.S., and nearly 0.5 a pound of glyphosate to all cropland worldwide.

As you might suspect, when you use this much of a chemical, it doesn’t simply stay on the fields. Laboratory testing commissioned by the organizations Moms Across America and Sustainable Pulse revealed that glyphosate is now showing up virtually everywhere.

Monsanto’s ‘Gift’ to Newborns

The analysis revealed glyphosate in levels of 76 μg/L to 166 μg/L in women’s breast milk. As reported by The Detox Project, this is 760 to 1,600 times higher than the EU-permitted level in drinking water (although it’s lower than the U.S. maximum contaminant level for glyphosate, which is 700 μg/L.)2

This dose of glyphosate in breastfed babies’ every meal is only the beginning. An in vitro study designed to simulate human exposures also found that glyphosate crosses the placental barrier. In the study, 15 percent of the administered glyphosate reached the fetal compartment.

Angelika Hilbeck, Ph.D., senior scientist at the Institute of Integrative Biology in Zurich, told The Detox Project:3

If confirmed in a full investigation, it seems that glyphosate has become a ubiquitous chemical in terms of presence and persistence.

This data also offers a first indication of potential accumulation in the human body, giving newborns a substantial dose of synthetic chemicals as a ‘gift’ for their start into life, with unknown consequences.

This is reckless and irresponsible conduct in a democratic society, which still has a living memory of previous reckless chemical contaminations, such as DDT.”

Glyphosate Found in Blood and Urine Samples

The analysis revealed glyphosate in additional samples as well, including the blood of non-pregnant Canadian women. Their average level was 73.6 μg/L, which is similar to the concentration found to have endocrine-disrupting effects in vitro.

Further, glyphosate was also detected in urine samples, and U.S. women had maximum glyphosate levels that were more than eight times higher than levels found in urine of Europeans.

Where is the glyphosate exposure coming from? It’s likely coming from food (although it could be in water as well). We don’t know exactly how much glyphosate may be in your food because the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) does not test for it.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) just announced in February 2016 that it would begin testing foods for glyphosate, however, which will help to quantify just how much glyphosate Americans are consuming.

For now, the analysis suggests that eating non-organic, genetically engineered (GE) foods (the prime candidates for Roundup spraying) is associated with higher glyphosate levels in your body. The Detox Project explained:4

Glyphosate levels have been found to be significantly higher in urine of humans who ate non-organic food, compared with those who ate mostly organic food. Chronically ill people showed significantly higher glyphosate residues in their urine than healthy people.

In a separate detailed analysis, glyphosate was found in the urine of cows, humans, and rabbits. Cows kept in a GM-free area had significantly lower glyphosate concentrations in urine than cows in conventional livestock systems.”

Glyphosate Is Contaminating Air and Water

Glyphosate and its degradation product, aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), were detected in more than 75 percent of air and rain samples collected during the 2007 growing season in the Mississippi Delta agricultural region.5

This could be even higher now, as since 1996 the use of glyphosate has risen nearly 15-fold.6 The testing commissioned by Moms Across America also found glyphosate in 13 of 21 U.S. drinking water samples tested.7

They contained glyphosate levels between 0.085 ug/l and 0.33 ug/l, which is only slightly below the EU maximum allowed level for glyphosate in drinking water of 0.1 ug/l. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standard for glyphosate in U.S. water supplies is 0.7 ppm.

Further, a 2012 analysis used a magnetic particle immunoassay to test for the presence of glyphosate in roughly 140 samples of groundwater from Catalonia, Spain. The analysis found that glyphosate was present above the limit of quantification in 41 percent of the samples.

This suggests the chemical does not break down rapidly in the environment, as its manufacturer claims, and instead it might be accumulating (both in the environment and in people).

Groundwater, which is water from rain, lakes, streams or other bodies of water that soaks into soil and bedrock, can easily become contaminated when chemicals in the soil with low biodegradability and high mobility empty into it.

When groundwater is used as a drinking water source, this contamination poses a risk to animals, plants and humans alike.

[Bold Emphasis added throughout]

Continue Reading At: Mercola.com