Some Thoughts On J. Allen Hynek

FakeNews

Source:RichardDolanPress.com
Richard Dolan
April 21, 2002

[Author’s Note: With a few modifications, this article is essentially excerpted from the second edition of UFOs and the National Security State, Volume 1. I am indebted to UFO researcher Val Germann for his assistance in preparing this article.]

Astronomer J. Allen Hynek is universally regarded as the most important scientist in the history of Ufology. He has even been called the “Galileo” of UFO research.

Yet, it is impossible to ignore Hynek’s complicity in publicly debunking UFOs for years. His own justification is well known: in order to retain access to official UFO reports, he could not afford to risk an open confrontation with the Air Force. Hynek made these claims as a matter of self defense, years after the fact in the 1970s, after he had been criticized by nearly everyone in the UFO field as an Air Force lackey. That this was Hynek’s reputation in the 1950s and 1960s seems all but forgotten today.

Jacques Vallee worked very closely with Hynek for years during the 1960s, and eventually concluded that “the Air Force kept Hynek around only as long as he was silent.” This is certainly true. The question is, why did Hynek keep silent? Was it because he was an unassertive type of person – that is, because of a feature of his personality? Nearly all UFO researchers who have written about Hynek say, in effect: yes, for all of his scientific virtues, he was not a fighter. An unfortunate but all too human weakness.

A detached analysis of the historical record does not justify this conclusion.

Generally speaking, Hyenk was a genial man who did not seek out open confrontations. This, in fact, was one of the important traits that made him valuable to national security interests. In the first place, Hynek was much more than a mere civilian scientist who “helped out” the Air Force. From 1942 to 1946, Hynek took a leave of absence from Ohio State University to work at the Johns Hopkins University, in Silver Springs, Maryland. While there, he was in charge of document security for the highly classified project sponsored by the Navy to develop a radio proximity fuse.

Along with radar and the atomic bomb, this is often considered as one of the three great scientific developments of the war. The device was a radio-operated fuse designed to screw into the nose of a shell and timed to explode at any desired distance from target.

  1. Allen Hynek. A central, and problematic, figure in the history of UFO research.

Many scientists, of course, performed work for the defense establishment during World War Two. But Hynek’s project was of considerable importance, and it does not appear that his main contribution was scientific: after all, he was an astrophysicist. Rather, one of his main efforts was in a security related area.

Vallee kept a diary during the period that he worked with Hynek. It remained unpublished until 1992 as Forbidden Science, long after Hynek was dead and enshrined as the “father of scientific ufology.” When read with care, Vallee’s observations make it clear that there was much more to J. Allen Hynek than initially met the eye. And yet, the UFO research community has continued to ignore the implications, and even the plain facts, that Vallee related.

The proximity fuse was six times more effective than the timed fuses it replaced. Hynek was in charge of document security for the development of this important weapon

For example, rumors had abounded through the 1960s that Blue Book was a public relations facade, and that there was a “secret study” of UFOs going on. Vallee, too, had his suspicions, and broached this subject with Hynek every so often. Hynek inevitably rejected such opinions without reservation. Blue Book, Hynek maintained, was the real thing, albeit a project that was being done incompetently.

Vallee was never quite convinced. He noticed Hynek’s cagey attitude about UFOs, that he seemed to know much more than he usually let on about the subject, that he often appeared to be more interested in self promotion than actual study of the problem, and that his personal records were in a state of near disaster.

Then Vallee found the infamous “Pentacle Memorandum” in Hynek’s office. This was a highly classified document from January 1953, proving the existence of a separate study group of UFOs, and which urged that the Robertson Panel be delayed until they had come to their own conclusions. Very strong stuff. In the mid 1960s, there was still no inkling among the wider public that there was any such study as this.

On another occasion, a colleague of Vallee and Hynek showed Vallee “some very interesting photographs taken from an airplane.” Here is the relevant passage:

“Do you know who took these? Allen did! But he hasn’t recorded the place, the date or the time …” It turns out Allen was aboard an airliner when he suddenly noticed a white object at his altitude, seemingly flying at the same speed as the plane. He made sure it wasn’t a reflection and he convinced himself it must be some faraway cloud with an unusual shape. He pulled out his camera ‘to see how fast he could snap pictures.’ In all he took two pairs of stereoscopic photographs and gave it no more thought.

The photographs themselves appeared in a book authored by Hynek and Vallee in 1975, The Edge of Reality. They may or may not be of a flying saucer, but they are certainly not clouds. The importance of stereoscopic photographs cannot be overemphasized. Such a camera is of outstanding evidentiary value. Hynek, in effect, had captured a possible Holy Grail on film. But what happened?

Vallee continues:

Fred only learned about this a few weeks later. But then Hynek had lost the negatives and one shot from every pair was missing. … Naturally the loss of the negatives makes it impossible to determine whether it was really a cloud or not. Fred is indignant: “Sometimes I have the feeling Allen doesn’t want to know,” he says.

Hynek, who had headed document security for the proximity fuse project, “lost” one (and only one) negative from such a set as this. One might well wonder, to whom did he actually pass this material?

One of the two photographs Hynek took from a plane with a stereoscopic camera. He nevertheless lost one (and only one) negative from each image.

During another conversation, Hynek mentioned to Vallee that the Air Force had sent him a new contract draft. He did not know whether or not he should sign it, and gave it to Vallee to read.

Vallee wrote:

The contract, I was surprised to read, was not really with the Air Force but with the Dodge Corporation, a subsidiary of McGraw Hill. “What’s McGraw Hill doing in the middle of all this?” I asked without trying to hide my bafflement. “Is that some sort of cut out?” “Oh, they are just contractors to the Foreign Technology Division,” Hynek replied. “By working through companies like McGraw Hill, which is a textbook publisher, it’s easier for them to hire professors and scholars to conduct some Intelligence activities, keeping up with Soviet technology, for example. Many academics would be nervous saying they were working for the Foreign Technology Division.” The contract clearly puts Hynek under the administrative supervision of a man named Sweeney, who is not a scientist. And it clearly specifies Hynek’s task as evaluating the sightings of unknown objects to determine if they represent a danger for the security of the United States.

Hynek’s substantial Air Force money was passed to him through a third party. Thus, Hynek’s relationship with “security” continued right through the 1960s. We also learn from Vallee that Hynek, despite his monthly trips to Wright-Patterson AFB, almost never saw Blue Book Chief Hector Quintanilla, but was received personally by the commander, who usually took him to lunch at the officer’s club. When Vallee asked Hynek what they talked about, Hynek replied, “innocently,” the weather and foreign cuisine.

The preceding passage raises other unanswered questions, such as how many other academics were receiving cut out money to hide their intelligence value? Hynek’s remarks implied that he knew quite a lot about this topic, but unfortunately, the conversation appeared to stop dead at that point. One might also wonder, who was Sweeney? And, since Hynek was being funded through one cut out organization, why not two (not at all an unusual intelligence practice)? That is, was the Air Force itself a cut out for another organization? This is currently an unanswerable question, but well worth asking in light of the clear evidence that the CIA was a major perhaps the major player behind the scenes in the UFO mystery.

Another interesting and generally ignored fact about Hynek was the close relationship he had with C. The astronomical community has always been small, and of course it is not surprising that, aside from the issue of UFOs, the two men would know each other well. But this relationship was more than a simple professional acquaintance.

From 1955 to 1960, for instance, Hynek was associate director of the Smithsonian Institution’s Astrophysics Observatory in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and headed its optical satellite tracking program. During this period he also lectured at Harvard University. Menzel, meanwhile, had been a full professor at Harvard since 1938 and was the most prestigious astrophysicist in North America. For all intents and purposes, Menzel was Harvard’s Astronomy Department. While Hynek was in town, Menzel was full director of the Harvard Observatory, and (as Vallee noted in passing) was Hynek’s mentor. On one occasion, Hynek declined to write a Forward for Menzel’s book. One assumes, then, that Menzel asked in the first place.

Donald Menzel was an arch-UFO debunker, senior member of the U.S. intelligence community, and an alleged MJ-12 member. He was also a mentor of J. Allen Hynek.

When considering the public opposition the two occasionally had (such as their participation in a scientific debate on UFOs in late 1952), this closeness seems out of place. But the public view is often the misleading view.

Menzel, of course, was not merely one of the world’s leading astronomers. He was a man tightly connected to the upper levels of the American national security community, and personally close to Vannevar Bush. During the war, Menzel chaired the Radio Propagation Committee of the Joint and Combined Chiefs of Staff and the Section of Mathematical and Physical Research of U.S. Naval Communications. He was a top level cryptologist who had a longstanding association with the National Security Agency, possessed a Navy Top Secret Ultra security clearance, consulted for 30 companies on classified projects, and worked for the CIA. Through the entire 1950s, Menzel was still a serving intelligence officer.

Revelations such as these about are especially important when one considers how sanitized Hynek’s treatment continues to be at the hands of most writers in the UFO field. Indeed, even Menzel is sanitized. Jerome Clark, for instance, claimed that Menzel’s secret government work “does not significantly differentiate him from many other elite scientists of his generation.” There is some truth in this statement, but the larger picture is missed. What matters is that the surface and undercurrent move in different directions.

In the 1950s, as today, UFOs were a topic of great secrecy. They were important. In this context, the classified lives of men like Hynek and Menzel matter a very great deal. These were men strongly connected with the topic of UFOs, who by their outward appearance were at antipodes. Yet, below the surface, many commonalities existed.

Hynek’s defenders have remained at the surface, claiming that his position on UFOs evolved over the years from skeptic to believer. Such a simple transition is unlikely. For years, Hynek had access to classified Air Force UFO reports. Many of those reports were unusual and unconventional – as Hynek himself stated years after the fact – and the Air Force official explanations for many of these were clearly absurd. Yet, for year after year, he did nothing. Even followers in good faith might ask: what took him so long?

Hynek’s remarks and insights, provided years after the fact, remain of value to the UFO researcher. But the careful reader must remain mindful of Hynek’s history in this subject. It is a history that, depending upon which character flaw was his correct one, leads any serious researcher into a stance of wariness regarding J. Allen Hynek.

Read More At: RichardDolanPress.com

Book Review: Alien Agenda by Jim Marrs

AlienAgenda
TheBreakaway | BreakawayConciousness
Zy Marquiez
March 21, 2017

Jim Marrs has been putting out high quality work for some time.  Backing his hard work with extensive research of over 30 years experience, Marrs has set the research bar high with books like The Rise Of The Fourth Reich, Rule By Secrecy, Our Occulted History, and Popular Control.  This book is no different.

Alien Agenda – Investigating The Extraterrestrial Presence Among Us is definitely one of the most seminal and top-tier no-nonsense books on UFOs out there.

In a realm of research that that is littered with countless books with not much sourced material, and even more witness and whistleblower testimony, this book is definitely near the top tier.

As a book for someone just getting in, this book is really top notch.  The only book I would recommend more personally would be Richard Dolan’s UFOs For The 21st Century Mind: A Fresh Guide To An Ancient Mystery.

Taking a thorough and methodical approach which is signature in all of his books, Marrs brings the reader along the journey of all things UFOlogy.  Notably, this book covers a wide breadth of the information within the UFO field.  From issues with NASA, to The Moon, Ancient Astronauts, to Roswell, and even intricate subjects like Area 51, Crop Circles, and some of the most widely known UFO accounts, Marrs sought to leave no stone unturned.  The book really is a veritable encyclopedia of much of this elusive and thought-provoking phenomena.

If the book only covered those above topics, that would still make it a great book, knowing reliance on sourced material Marrs employs.  But there’s more.  Marrs also covers abstruse subjects such as abductions & missing time, the CIA, MJ-12, cattle mutilations, remote viewing, and even takes a metaphysical gander into ‘the phenomenon’ that’s quite unique.  This book really employs a wide range.   Marrs even ventures into the role of big finance in this abstruse subject.

Another salient point is that this book is footnoted to the hilt!  That ALONE takes this to a whole different level, which is rarely achieved in UFOlogy except only by the best researchers.  That is one reason why my respect of Jim Marrs has only grown overtime, because he doesn’t just connect dots that people can’t verify themselves.

For everything it offers, this book offers a lot of value.  Anyone really interested in the subject would be doing themselves a great disservice by overlooking it.  This book is a must have.
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This article is free and open source. You have permission to republish this article under a Creative Commons license with attribution to Zy Marquiez and TheBreakaway.wordpress.com.
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About The Author:

Zy Marquiez is an avid book reviewer, researcher, an open-minded skeptic, yogi, humanitarian, and freelance writer who studies regularly subjects like Consciousness, Education, Creativity, The Individual, Ancient History & Ancient Civilizations, Forbidden Archaeology, Big Pharma, Alternative Health, Space, Geoengineering, Social Engineering, Propaganda, and much more.

His own personal blog is BreakawayConsciousnessBlog.wordpress.com where his personal work is shared, while TheBreakaway.wordpress.com serves as a media portal which mirrors vital information usually ignored by mainstream press, but still highly crucial to our individual understanding of various facets of the world.

Science, Secrecy, And Ufology

Secrecy
Source: RichardDolanpress.com
Richard Dolan
December 26, 2000

Secrecy permeates the UFO field. What does this mean for Ufology as a science? Answer: the field cannot really be handled scientifically within the public domain. The great model is the Manhattan Project. When a project is undertaken at highly classified levels, you will find nothing of value about it within the mainstream. This was true during the development of the atomic bomb in the 1940s; it is true regarding the UFO.

Missing the Obvious

Somethings are so obvious that they are invisible.

Segments of the intelligence community have been intensely interested in UFOs since the problem emerged after World War Two. Moreover, they have monitored and infiltrated the UFO field. Conversely, the “mainstream” (as opposed to “classified”) scientific community has ignored UFOs altogether. Ask yourself a simple question: why this discrepancy?

What passes for Ufology has spun its wheels for fifty years. Not only have even its most important researchers been unable to force recognition of the problem by official powers (not very surprising, after all), but some of these same researchers have not even taken a definite stand on what UFOs might represent. That is, they have been working without a hypothesis (!) and so in many cases have merely piled up sighting after sighting for years and years, and then expected this pile of “evidence” to do the trick. But in any intellectual endeavor, piling up evidence is never enough. The researcher has to organize and analyze the evidence through hypothesis or supposition. Without this effort, there is no research, only what Gore Vidal calls “scholarly squirreling” of data in a hole in a hollow tree. What can we say about such researchers, some of whom having been in the field for decades, or even in some cases, generations? What have they been doing?

A young innocent who wants to learn more about this topic – a subject of the utmost seriousness and importance – can easily become bewildered by the confusion. Should one side with Klass, Shaeffer, and Korff, or Hynek, Ruppelt, and Keyhoe, or Friedman, or Randall? Does one follow the line of the conservative J. Allen Hynek Center of UFO Studies (CUFOS), the paranormal leanings of MUFON, or the coverup themes of UFO Magazine? On the Internet, should one haunt the tepid world of listserves like Project 1947 or UFO Updates, or dive right into John Greenwald’s Black Vault?

Four centuries ago, Rene Descartes established a very simple principle of knowledge: one must create a strong skeleton – that is, a foundation of unquestionable facts – and build an edifice upon it.

So let us be Cartesian, and review the obvious.

Secrecy and the National Security Crowd

In 1946, a year before the great deluge of reports here in the states, Americans monitored “ghost rockets” over Europe. Two prominent American generals conferred with the Swedes, and censorship over the Swedish press followed. The Greek Army also investigated, according to Dr. Paul Santorini, a key scientist in the development of the atomic bomb. The Greeks concluded the objects were not Soviet, nor were they missiles. The American military then pressured them into silence.

In 1947, UFOs appeared over American skies in large numbers. Some incidents were quite serious, such as the repeated violation of air space over the Oak Ridge Nuclear Facility. Oak Ridge housed some of the most sophisticated technology in the world and was highly classified: one did not simply fly over there. Yet Army Intelligence and the FBI monitored dozens of intrusions over Oak Ridge well into the 1950s. Similar violations occurred over sensitive places in Los Alamos, Hanford, and many military bases. All of this was classified, of course. Americans knew nothing about them at the time.

In a classified memo, General Nathan Twining wrote of the possibility – based on the careful evaluation of military personnel – that “some of the objects are controlled.” Controlled by whom was the $64,000 question, and America’s national security establishment set out to answer it, far removed from the prying eyes of the public.

In 1949, an FBI memo stated that: “Army intelligence has recently said that the matter of ‘unidentified aircraft’ or ‘unidentified aerial phenomena’ … is considered top secret by intelligence officers of both the Army and the Air Forces.”

In 1950, Robert Sarbacher, a physicist with the DOD Research & Development Board, privately told Canadian official Wilbert Smith that UFOs were “the most highly classified subject in the U.S. government.”

After an extraordinary UFO encounter near Fort Monmouth, New Jersey in 1951, Air Force officer Edward Ruppelt attended a two-hour meeting chaired by General Charles Cabell, the Director of Air Force Intelligence (and later Deputy CIA Director). The meeting was recorded, but the tape “was so hot that it was later destroyed. . . . to be conservative, it didn’t exactly follow the tone of the official Air Force releases.”

The CIA, meanwhile, had monitored the problem since at least 1948. After the UFO wave of 1952, the Agency sponsored the Robertson Panel, which convened in January 1953 – the final weekend of the Truman presidency. The panel debunked UFOs, and its recommendations resulted in the gutting of Project Blue Book (already a public relations burden) and heightened surveillance of civilian UFO organizations.

Clearly, this was an issue considered to be of the utmost seriousness. As a result, it was not a topic ordinary citizens could simply waltz into and get easy answers. Observe what happened to the most dangerous of all civilian organizations: the National Investigative Committee on Aerial Phenomena (NICAP). Founded in 1956 with the goal of ending UFO secrecy, it was quickly and secretly infiltrated by “ex-CIA” officers involved in CIA psychological warfare operations. The most important of them, Colonel Joseph Bryan, was the key player in the ouster of Director Donald Keyhoe in 1969. A succession of CIA men then ran NICAP into the ground. Needless to say, no one outside the Agency knew of their CIA connections.

One might complain this was all a long time ago. Does the military still take UFOs seriously? Does the intelligence community still infiltrate UFO organizations? After all, if UFOs are still important, then intelligence operatives would presumably still need to monitor and influence the key organizations. Is there any reason to believe this is so?

In a word, yes. The military still encounters UFOs, as many reports continue to prove. Moreover, secrecy orders about UFOs remain in effect. In 1975, the late Senator Barry Goldwater stated that UFOs were still classified “above Top Secret.” As one of my Navy acquaintances recently said to me: “If I were to tell you what I knew about that subject, I would probably go to prison.”

In the mid-1980s, UFO researcher William Moore admitted to working covertly with the intelligence world, to the shock and dismay of his colleagues. But stuff like this is surely the tip of a large iceberg. Ufology is dominated by men and women connected to the world of intelligence, usually through prior experience in the military or CIA. Why is this so? What does it mean to Ufology that this is the case? It is a question I will return to – more than once, I suspect – in future articles.

Science

Throughout history, people have used outdated concepts to think about the world, especially during periods of rapid change. It’s unavoidable. We remain wedded to the concepts we learned in our youth, while reality races ahead. Observe our cultural attitudes toward science. Science, we were taught, is a bastion, indeed the foundation, of intellectual freedom in the world. It is an independent search for truth, and the destroyer of social and religious myths.

How independent is science? In whose interest is it practiced today? This is no idle question, for gone are the days of scientists following their intellectual passions in a search for truth. Earlier this year, James Lovelock, a pioneer in environmental science now in his eighties, had this to say:

Nearly all scientists are employed by some large organization, such as a governmental department, a university, or a multinational company. Only rarely are they free to express their science as a personal view. They may think that they are free, but in reality they are, nearly all of them, employees; they have traded freedom of thought for good working conditions, a steady income, tenure, and a pension.

Science is an expensive business, and you need sponsorship. I laughed out loud when a sincere and interested reader of my book asked me who sponsored my research. But, he is a scientist, for whom such a thing is absolutely necessary.

Reflect on the following:

  1. Since the Second World War, the military has been by far the biggest sponsor of scientific work.
  2. The military and intelligence community has exhibited extreme levels of interest in the UFO phenomenon, and high levels of classification have enveloped the subject.
  3. It would seem logical that the military has sponsored classified – that is, secret – scientific work on this problem for many years.
  4. In public, however, mainstream scientists offer nothing more than ridicule or scorn upon the topic of UFOs

Like any other segment of our civilization, scientists follow the money. If the cash is there, so are they; if not, forget about it. If, as I believe, the vast sponsorship of UFO research is classified, we will not hear positive statements about the subject from the mainstream. Moreover, the extreme specialization of science ensures that mavericks do not stray into the uncharted seas of UFO research. The result is widespread ignorance by scientists of even the basics of the UFO phenomenon. At least, this is so within the non-classified, mainstream areas of research. In the classified world, we can only surmise, but we can do so based on some facts.

We know without question that within the first few years of the appearance of UFOs, many top-flight scientists became involved in some way with this phenomenon – in every case at the classified level. By no means exhaustive, here are some of the more noteworthies: Lloyd Berkner, Edward Teller, Detlev Bronk, Vannevar Bush, David Sarnoff, Thornton Page, H. P. Robertson, Allen Hynek, and Lincoln La Paz. In the case of Bush and Bronk, the connection has not been proven to the satisfaction of some skeptics, but even in their case, the evidence remains strong. For the rest, the case is open-and-shut. These men were some of the elite power scientists in the world, and intimately connected with the American defense establishment. And yet, we find them looking at UFO reports. Of course, let us not forget Harvard astronomer and UFO debunker extraordinaire, Donald Menzel, who, unbeknownst to the world, was deeply involved with the American intelligence community, in particular the super-secret National Security Agency.

One supposes that we shall have to wait another few decades to learn about our contemporaries – in other words, long after the issue becomes moot. Such secrecy, we realize, is not unique to UFOs. It is standard operating procedure. We learn the truth after it becomes irrelevant.

The Great Secrecy Model

As was stated above, when a project is undertaken at highly classified levels, you will find nothing of value about it within the mainstream. The primordial example is the Manhattan Project. Here was an undertaking of such magnitude that secrecy was of paramount importance. How to design and build an atomic bomb without the enemy knowing? It is, of course, a multifarious question. One of the answers, however, was to hide the knowledge from Congress itself – despite the fact that it involved unprecedented outlays of money. Amazingly, the plan succeeded.

In fact, when scientists detonated a nuclear bomb at Los Alamos on July 16, 1945, the most spectacular and ominous event in the history of science, no one outside that small classified circle knew a thing. Consider the implications. The work was done in a secrecy so profound that the mainstream scientific literature had nothing of import to say about nuclear technology. The information was too sensitive to discuss openly.

Significantly, though the Manhattan Project remained secret from the public, it was not secret from the Soviets, who had penetrated the American defense and scientific establishment, and used data from the project to build an atomic bomb years ahead of schedule. This pattern, in fact, recurred throughout the Cold War: more often than not, the American public was kept in the dark about black projects more successfully than were the Soviet authorities. Many times, it was they and not the Soviets who were the true target of secrecy – for instance, in such cases as the U-2 flyovers or mind control experiments.

Thus, the Manhattan Project possesses staggering historical importance for so many reasons, not the least of which is that it has served as a model ever since for conducting expensive and covert operations. Hiding the money, keeping the real talk classified, and steering the public discussion – all of these were successfully tackled by the national security world of the 1940s.

If it’s important, it’s probably secret. This was true during the development of the atomic bomb in the 1940s; it is almost certainly true regarding the UFO.

Implications

Those of us without a “need to know” about UFOs can still learn a few things. Enough information exists within the public realm that we can put many of the pieces together. It is, frankly, what I have tried to do in my recent study.

Do the math. For more than fifty years, millions of people have experienced a global phenomenon from agencies unknown, possessing what appears to be fantastic technology. We have on record hundreds of military UFO encounters and reports, with undoubted interest and infiltration by the intelligence world. Compound this with disturbingly strong claims of abduction (and even worse) on the part of these others, and you have powerful reasons for abject silence on the part of our erstwhile leaders.

The math is not higher calculus. No, it is simple addition, and when you add it up the conclusion is forced: this is a fundamentally covert event of awesome magnitude.

But we should not fool ourselves into thinking that we can “get to the bottom” of this. That is, as mere citizens of what some would call an oligarchic empire that masquerades as a democracy, we are unlikely to get official confirmation regarding something as important as an alien presence. And even if we did get such “confirmation,” could we truly depend on the accuracy and completeness of the information? I think you know the answer.

Knowledge may give us an edge in some way. Or, our situation may more closely match the American natives of 500 years ago. Either way, we on the outside are on our own where this phenomenon is concerned, and it behooves us to become as educated about it as we can. Otherwise, we experience our fate – for good or ill – in the dark.

Read More At: RichardDolanPress.com

 

Richard Dolan: Why UFOs Matter

UFOHub
March 12, 2017

Historian and researcher Richard Dolan, who is author of UFOs & The National Security State – Chronology Of A Cover Up, speaks about what got him into studying UFOs, why the are crucial to understand and the historical implications of this issue.

http://www.richarddolanpress.com

Book Review: The Secret Space Program & Breakaway Civilization by Richard Dolan

richarddolanbreakaway
TheBreakaway
Zy Marquiez
January 9, 2017

For those that don’t know, Richard Dolan is a scholar, historian, and renown researcher within the field of alternative research.

Dolan’s research has been integral in bringing in a new fresh point of view within the field of UFOlogy and this works exemplifies this rather trenchantly.

The Secret Space Program & Breakaway Civilization by Richard Dolan mirrors incisively the rest of his works quite well, although in a much more shortened manner given the length of the book.

Having coined the term “Breakaway Civilization” in his UFOs & The National Security State series, Dolan follows up with this booklet, which is a salient synopsis of the presentation he gave in San Mateo, CA in 2014 at the Secret Space Program & Breakaway Civilization Conference.

Admittedly, if you have seen that particular presentation of Dolan on youtube, then this will be nothing new.  However, if you are new to the subject, or want to have a written reference for what Dolan discussed in his presentation, then this book is certainly for you.

Dolan begins discusses UFO reports/statistics and the ongoing phenomena.  Thereafter, the author discusses the fascinating story of Ingo Swann and his remote viewing prowess.  Swann’s findings and experience definitely lend a thread of credibility that makes the reader aghast at the possibilities.  The fact that remote viewing experimentations were taking place decades ago shows how vital this type of discipline was to reconnaissance and more.

Discussed soon after are Karl Wolfe’s testimony, which he shared during the Disclosure Project, Donna Hare’s testimony regarding having to airbrush any evidence of UFOs as well as the story of Vito Saccheri.

Throughout the book Dolan homes in on the implications of the SSP & Breakaway Civilization at various stages and how these interweave with our reality in many ways.  This is appreciated given how many new folks will be reading this particular subject, and to have this subject analyzed and spoken about in a methodical, no-nonsense but in-depth and open-minded way is definitely refreshing.

Another data point delved into is Leonard Stringfield’s finding of “the crash retrieval syndrome” coupled with some cases which are highly provocative to say the least.

Also noted within the book is Dolan’s gander at what journalist James Goodall was told, which regarded highly advanced technologies stationed at the Nevada desert at the time.

Most notably, Dolan makes sure to harpoon many of the deeper implications that the subjects of Secret Space Programs and Breakaway Civilizations entail, as well as why it’s vital for the SSP & Breakaway Complex to maintain control of the subject and more importantly, the sciences.

Dolan also gives a glance at the ever illusive paradox of disclosure, while also giving light to some of the more notable renderings that relate to footage of UFOs, such as the STS 114 footage.

Soon thereafter, the author gives what he sees as the most likely scenario of the topic at hand, while also giving a cursory glance to the possible goals of the handlers.

Finally, Dolan gives his take on what individuals can do to detach from the control system and help bring about change in this discipline as well as others.

In its totality, the book not only gives individuals a hardcopy of one of Richard Dolan’s best presentations, but it’s also a different way of assimilating information.   Different people learn in different ways, and having this type of media for people to learn is highly helpful for those that appreciate tangible books like myself.

This book, or perhaps most notably, the idea of a Breakaway Civilization and  Secret Space Program certainly helps put many seemingly disparate pieces come together in a way that helps shed light onto the darkness that abounds.  And in that, this book certainly shines.

Having said that, we need cognize that how the world looks a century from now will be proportional to how individuals decide to live their lives in relation to this topic and others.  If individuals so choose to educate themselves becoming autodidacts, and also incite others into actions such as Richard Dolan has and continues to do, then the world will in fact begin to change accordingly.

[Book Review] UFOs &The National Security State –Chronology Of A Cover Up [Volume 1] – By Richard Dolan

DV1

TheBreakaway
Zy Marquiez
June 13, 2016

Over the last decade or so, Richard Dolan has become the unofficial historian of UFOlogy, and with good reason. Dolan, in his usual no-nonsense, methodical and rational approach has brought credibility to UFOlogy, which at times is a topic that can leave one’s head spinning.

In his second volume in this series Dolan also coined the term ‘Breakaway Civilization’, which also dovetails trenchantly with this analysis.

UFOs & The National Security State –Chronology Of A Cover Up [Volume 1] by Richard Dolan brings forth a substantial effort in chronicling many of the most notable Unidentified Flying Object sighting in modern history [1941-1973].

A most comprehensive/compelling dissertation of the dilemma humanity is facing within our skies is carried out in this book, and the fact that Dolan carries it out in an objective manner is not something to be taken lightly.

Dolan does an exemplary job in detailing not only the cover up of one of the greatest secrets of human history, but he has also centers his sights on the National Security Apparatus as well as the Military Industrial Complex, both of which have played a monumental role in creating this reality matrix that has been carefully manifested around us.

Furthermore, showing his attention to detail and nuts and bolt approach, Dolan is meticulous in footnoting all sources.  This is quite appreciated, because in the arena of ufology, where it’s tough to find tangible evidence – it is one of the biggest covers up after all – it’s great to have someone who’s willing to stick to documentation rather than ‘insider testimony’.  Not saying the latter doesn’t matter, but, it’s quite overdone in many circles and this is a much-needed common sense approach.

Coupled with the above, the author also brings forth of the issues of UFO sightings near nuclear facilities.  This in it of itself should be highly disturbing, because regardless if you think there are others out there, the simple fact that there is someone technologically advanced enough not only to penetrate the airspace of the United States and its military, but to do so with impunity, in what should be the most secure facilities on the planet [Nuclear weapons are the most powerful weapons on Earth, on paper, after all, aren’t they?] is HIGHLY DISTURBING.  The fact that it’s covered up is even more so.

But there is far, far more.

Dolan examines the high strangeness in abductions, cattle mutilations and the like, but also examines much of the disinformation and psychological operations that are carried out by the governments in order to downplay, and ridicule this issue.

This book sets out to lay the foundation for what will undoubtedly be one of the most pressing issues mankind faces right at this moment.

There is nothing else out there even remotely close to this book in this field, except the works of Dr. McDonald and the work of Major Donald Keyhoe. Both have done a rather incisive job in carrying out similar work as Dolan.

Dolan’s nod to the old school researchers is definitely a classy gesture, and shows the nature of the man and the respect he shows those in his field.

If you want credibility, a thoughtful, cogent examination of an issue that has plagued us at least – at minimum – for the last few decades and will continue to affect us thorough the rest of our history, this book is definitely for you.

Everyone should read this book.  Regardless of what you believe, it should be your civic duty and responsibility to be informed in this groundbreaking and thought-provoking issue, because eventually we will face it head on, whether the comptrollers want us or not.

[Book Review] UFOs – Generals, Pilots & Government Officials Go On Record By Leslie Kean

Kean
TheBreakaway
Zy Marquiez
May 31, 2016

In her book UFOs – Generals, Pilots & Government Officials Go On Record, Leslie Kean lays an ironclad foundation to the subject of unidentified flying objects [UFOs].

The author and contributors do a rather compelling job of outlining the main components of each of the respective incidents discussed, and doing so in a way that’s reasonable, yet thought provoking.  Kean also discusses various other pertinent issues regarding the UFO phenomena.

Many of the best known UFO sightings are showcased by Kean.  Some of the most notable sightings discussed in the book range from the more recent Phoenix Lights incident, which of course officials say were “flares” [who buys that?], to the older and yet just as compelling Belgian UFO wave.   Another rather salient encounter that has been covered at length by other researcher but is one with extensive credibility is the Rendelsham Forest incident.  Of course, there are many more significant sightings that are distilled by the author/contributors which people should know about.

Coupled with the above information Kean also dabbles into part of UFOlogys history, such as the nascent stages of COMETA et al.

That said, given some of the more well known sightings, veteran researchers and readers will undoubtedly know most if not all of the information provided.  That really depends on how much research a given person has put into this field.

That is not the say the book does not have plenty to offer, because it does.  It’s just that the author focuses on many of the most well known incidents, which many folks will be familiar with.  Still, Kean does an exemplary job of bringing lucidity to a field that has long sought for it, and doing so in a scholarly manner.

Kean precision is seen by how she buttresses her book, which is with the most concrete evidence that’s available.

Curiously, for a book that tackles the ‘fringe’, it does seem to play it safe however.  That’s the ‘feel’ that one gets from the author.  For how well executed certain parts of the book were, others felt as if though she had bulls-eyes right in front of her, but she didn’t lay out possibilities in their greatest extent.  In that way, the book feels like a ‘controlled’ release of information of already-sifted-through phenomena, and in that sense, it wouldn’t ‘make any waves’.

Its ironic because many people mentioned that this was “the book” that would change everything.  And don’t give me wrong, this is a great book.  And it will certainly open its fair share of eyes just by its existence.  Still, the information covered has been discussed by countless more authors out there, and in that sense, it could have more significant anchors.   All things considered, the credibility the author brings to the subject should be taken very seriously.

The collection of testimonies does give a preponderance of evidence – given the veracity of the witnesses et al. – that something within our world is amiss.

Without a doubt, the book is an excellent starting point for those who wish to delve into this abstruse subject, and would serve as a great reference for veteran researchers in the field, or anyone else interested in this fascinating subject.  In fact, the book would serve as an excellent springboard when read before Richard Dolan’s UFOs And The National Security State, which for all intents and purposes is the unofficial Encyclopedia to a modern UFO phenomena.

All in all, given the importance of the information, everyone should read this book.   Everyone. 

As humanity continues to slowly seep into space, more and more UFO sightings will continue taking place.  Questions such as: Who is behind these sightings?  Why are these sightings taking place?  Is it us, them, or…?  And if its them, where do they come from, and how long have they been here, and elsewhere?

Those are just an iota of of the handful of the many questions humanity will have to contend with as we move towards a more technologically advanced culture.

This book begins shedding light for the common populace to see that there really is something taking place in our skies, and probably beyond.

That alone is worth the price of the book.

And if just a fraction of what’s being stated here is true – and keep in mind the credibility of these individuals is top-notch – then the world already is a vastly different place than what we have been taught.

And if that’s the case, what else don’t we know?