I Was Sprayed With Insecticide Flying to Australia: Linked to Brain Tumors, Parkinson’s

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Source: TheMindUnleashed.com
Cassius Methyl
March 7, 2017

Last week I took a flight from California to Australia.

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After a long 14 hour flight, everyone stood up and eagerly anticipated leaving the plane. Instead of getting off, we were informed that the plane would be sprayed with a “non toxic” insecticide.

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I quickly grabbed my thick jacket, put my hood over my head, covered my face and made sure every breath I took was filtered through the jacket. Flight attendants walked up and down the isles, spraying the luggage bins and the passengers almost directly.

I waited for about 10 minutes while they made us sit in the fumes. I heard a few people cough. When we finally got up to leave the plane, a flight attendant asked me if I was ok because I was covering my face and I said “of course, just avoiding breathing this, it’s toxic.”

He matter of factly responded “it’s non toxic.” I replied “of course it’s toxic, everything that is an insecticide is toxic.”

What I should have showed him is that flight attendants like him have gotten brain tumors and Parkinson’s Disease, and sued the government for mandating use of insecticide on flights.

According to a December 2013 article from the Daily Telegraph titled “Landmark legal case will probe the link between Parkinson’s disease and insecticide sprays used on long-haul flights”:

“LONG-haul flight attendants who have been forced to spray insecticide through aircraft cabins every time they landed in Australia fear the chemicals may have given them Parkinson’s disease.

And experts have warned any frequent international flyer exposed to repeated doses of insecticide within an enclosed aircraft cabin could also face the same risk.

Former Qantas steward Brett Vollus has been diagnosed with the disease, which can leave victims immobile, speechless or with tremors, and is preparing to launch a legal action against the Commonwealth government, which enforces the need for spraying to prevent disease.

Mr Vollus, 52, worked as flight attendant with Qantas for 27 years up until May this year and was referred to a neurosurgeon as the symptoms of Parkinson’s began to kick in.

Checks also uncovered a malignant brain tumour.”

The former flight attendant Brett Vollus continued:

“We all blindly sprayed this insecticide as we landed in Australia after every long-haul flight. Why wasn’t I warned that it could give me this disease?

This is a nightmare that has ruined my life. I am very keen to start a legal action and if it can help others I am happy to lead the way.”

It’s oddly difficult to research online exactly what insecticides are sprayed on flights. The practice is decades old, with the infamous pesticide DDT being sprayed on flights to Australia from the 1940’s to 70’s .

According to Mother Jones:

“Exposing travelers on domestic flights to dangerous chemicals is not new. From 1944 until the late 1970s, airlines sprayed DDT on their planes, sometimes even while passengers were on board.

And from 1986 to 1996, Northwest Airlines used Bolt, a pesticide that contains chlorpyrifos, a potential nervous system poison. In 1994, the Journal of Pesticide Reform reported that chlorpyrifos may cause symptoms ranging from nausea to convulsions, and may also produce birth defects and other genetic damage in humans.”

The most detailed info I could find about what exactly is being sprayed comes from the first hand experience of a passenger, published at Health Nut News in an article titled “Woman removed by 6 Policemen off her flight for questioning what was being sprayed on her.” Reading from it:

“The most common pesticides used on airplanes are the synthetic pyrethroids permethrin and d-phenothrin (they kill insects by attacking their nervous systems) and studies have linked permethrin with Parkinson’s disease. But remember, the World Health Organization says it’s just fine.

Since the spraying began, passengers have reported flu-like symptoms, sinus issues, rash/hives, headaches, and swollen joints- and that’s just some of what’s been reported; far more serious issues like acute respiratory problems and anaphylactic shock have also occurred. But don’t worry, the WHO says there is no evidence that spraying insecticide in enclosed spaces, onto people, is dangerous.”

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The Australian Department of Agriculture and Water Resources is the agency responsible for overseeing the spraying of insecticide on flights. An Australian government entity that regulates and influences pesticide use is called the Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority.

Sometimes the passengers sit in toxic fumes for the duration of a flight, instead of being sprayed for minutes at the end. According to Traveler:

“What happens now is the Department of Agriculture grants approval to airlines to perform their own disinfection treatment. Disinfection spraying is carried out at the last overseas airport before departure for Australia.

Treatment takes place after catering has been loaded, with the airconditioning system switched off, the overhead bins open and before passengers have boarded. If the required disinfection has not been carried out, the aircraft will be sprayed on arrival prior to passenger disembarkation.”

Another recently developed pesticide in Australia is being hyped as a non toxic alternative, Sero-X. It is made from peptides that naturally occur in a plant. This is probably not going to be sprayed on airplanes though.

In concept it sounds like a viable alternative to neonicotinoids or organophosphates, but if you know the history of pesticides you might find it hard to believe in something like that.

Please share this with any person flying to Australia, because it benefits us to know exactly what we ingest, and how bad ideas become a routine aspect of life we are coerced into accepting.

Read More At: TheMindUnleashed.com

Image credit: Wiki, NT, NH365, TL, Source

DEA Caught Spying on Innocent Travelers to Steal Hundreds of Millions — And It’s 100% “Legal”

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Source: FreeThoughtProject.com
Claire Bernish
August 11, 2016

An intensely troubling report proves the DEA pilfers millions in cash from travelers with little, if any, evidence they committed even minor crimes — and virtually never return any of the money, even if charges are never levied.

Worse, simply purchasing a one-way ticket — or even flying to California — constitutes sufficient reason for the DEA to target someone for a potential cash seizure.

“We want the cash,” George Hood, a now-retired agent who supervised a drug task force assigned to Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport, arrogantly boasted of supposed attempts to bring down cartels via their wallets. “Good agents chase cash.”

USA Today studied the DEA’s airport operations, and though information was difficult to obtain — due, in large part, to the rarity cash seizures led to arrests or even detainments by agents — it’s clear the agency has reaped an astonishing profit by regularly mining the travel records of millions of people.

As USA Today wrote of the cash-grabbing operation:

It is a lucrative endeavor, and one that remains largely unknown outside the drug agency. DEA agents assigned to patrol 15 of the nation’s busiest airports seized more than $209 million in cash from at least 5,200 people over the past decade after concluding the money was linked to drug trafficking, according to Justice Department records. Most of the money was passed onto local police departments that lend officers to assist the drug agency.

Those departments and the agency “count on this as part of the budget,” explained Louis Weiss, a former agent supervising the group assigned to the Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. “Basically, you’ve got to feed the monster.”

Agents frequently receive tips about putatively suspicious itineraries or travel patterns — paying in cash, purchasing a one-way ticket, or even having checked luggage — but cannot use such tips alone to detain passengers or search their belongings. After being alerted, agents use the information to question travelers and ask to search their bags.

Most often, agents seize large sums of cash — “sometimes totaling $50,000 or more, stuffed into suitcases or socks” — leaving a receipt in its place without ever arresting, detaining, or charging individuals with any crime.

Totals seized by the DEA vary widely by location: in Los Angeles, the total through mid-2015 topped $52.1 million; in Cincinnati, $18,047 — but that isn’t accidental. Destinations in California were flagged for connections to marijuana and narcotics trafficking.

Exactly how the DEA procures Americans’ travel records remains uncertain, as is the scope of the agency’s snooping — but USA Today spoke with several agents on condition of anonymity who made clear the cash-filching operation is extensive.

However unethical it might be to plunder money from wholly innocent people, under federal asset forfeiture law, the practice is perfectly legal. Any law enforcement agency has broad powers to seize cash and property from anyone if those items are suspected to be somehow related to a crime — but the hotly contentious program does not require any proof a crime has been committed or that the subject has been involved in criminal activity.

“Going after someone’s property has nothing to do with protecting them and it has everything to do with going after the money,” Renée Flaherty, attorney with the asset forfeiture-specializing Institute for Justice, aptly noted for USA Today.

Asset forfeiture has spurned so much controversy, the Department of Justice halted the program in late December 2015 — but the respite for the American public didn’t last long. Just three months later, the DOJ reinstated its highly lucrative property plundering, because revenue — from the government’s standpoint, what better way exists to rob the public blind with veritable impunity.

“To put it simply,” USA Today observed in 2013, law enforcement is “developing an addiction to drug money.”

Besides suspect travel plans, agents also use drug-sniffing K-9s to detect drugs in travelers bags as a pretext for searches, which could then lead to a lucrative seizure — a distressing fact, given a study seven years ago found cocaine residue on 90 percent of U.S. dollars. Thus, nearly anyone traveling with cash in their luggage — particularly in large amounts — could easily tip off a canine investigator.

According to five current and former agents who spoke with USA Today, the DEA has been able to cultivate a sweeping network of informants trained to scrutinize itineraries and tip off the agency — and most receive what amounts to kickbacks for their efforts in the form of a percentage of the haul. Indeed the web of informants is so extensive, “agents have been able to profile passengers traveling on most major airlines, including American, Delta, JetBlue, Southwest, United and others.”

Those airlines, however — acting with ethical integrity clearly devoid in government agencies — for the most part, remain reluctant to cooperate with the DEA’s efforts and would not hand over passenger information.

“They really did not want to be associated with subjecting their passengers to government scrutiny because of privacy issues,” Weiss explained. “They discouraged their employees from assisting us.”

Agents also told the news outlet in many cases, grounds even to arrest supposed couriers were hazy at best, and upon release would use the incident to sniff out more extensive trafficking involvement. But almost none of the encounters ever led to arrests or charges directly stemming from the DEA’s search and seizure operations.

“Of 87 cases USA Today identified in which the DEA seized cash after flagging a suspicious itinerary, only two resulted in the alleged courier being charged with a crime,” the outlet reported. “One involved a woman who was already a target of a federal money-laundering investigation; another alleged courier was arrested a month later on an apparently unrelated drug charge.”

Without arrests or charges — without crime — attached to almost any of the DEA’s cash grabs, how the program remains legal is anyone’s guess. Agents admitted that despite fairly significant busts of actual drugs, the DEA’s mission primarily rests in seizing cash.

And as the horribly failed and altogether farcically-premised drug war labors forward — reaffirmed by today’s announcement from the DEA it has no intent to reschedule cannabis from its position alongside cocaine and heroin as a dangerous substance with no medical value — Americans can expect the government’s legalized robbery scam to continue unabated.

Read More At: FreeThoughtProject.com