Big Step Forward for Sound Money: Texas Picks Company to Run Bullion Depository


Source: ActivistPost.com
Michael Maharrey
June 22, 2017

The Texas bullion depository took a major step closer to reality last week when officials formally announced the private vendor that will run the facility. The creation of a state bullion depository in Texas represents a power shift away from the federal government to the state, and it provides a blueprint that could ultimately end the Fed.

Gov. Greg Abbot signed legislation creating the state gold bullion and precious metal depository in June of 2015. The facility will not only provide a secure place for individuals, business, cities, counties, government agencies and even other countries to to store gold and other precious metals, the law also creates a mechanism to facilitate the everyday use of gold and silver in business transactions. In short, a person will be able to deposit gold or silver – and pay other people through electronic means or checks – in sound money.

Last Wednesday, Texas Comptroller Glenn Hegar announced Austin-based Lone Star Tangible Assets will build and operate the Texas Bullion Depository. Officials say the facility could open as early as next January.

The company will initially run the depository out of its current Austin location, and will build a new vault facility in the Austin area. Hegar said customers will not have to travel to Austin in order to utilize the depository. The plan is to establish a branch-like system.

“We envision a network of licensed and insured depository agents to help Texans sign up for our services,” Hegar told the Texas Tribune.

Tom Smelker will serve as the state’s first Texas Bullion Depository administrator. He is currently the director of Treasury Operations in the Comptroller’s office.

According to an article in the Star-Telegram, state officials want a facility ‘with an e-commerce component that also provides for secure physical storage for Bullion in an existing facility or a newly constructed facility.’ Officials say plans for a depository should include online services that would let customers accept, transfer and withdraw bullion deposits and related fees.

By making gold and silver available for regular, daily transactions by the general public, the new law has the potential for wide-reaching effect. Professor William Greene is an expert on constitutional tender and said in a paper for the Mises Institute that when people in multiple states actually start using gold and silver instead of Federal Reserve notes, it would effectively nullify the Federal Reserve and end the federal government’s monopoly on money.

Over time, as residents of the state use both Federal Reserve notes and silver and gold coins, the fact that the coins hold their value more than Federal Reserve notes do will lead to a ‘reverse Gresham’s Law’ effect, where good money (gold and silver coins) will drive out bad money (Federal Reserve notes).

As this happens, a cascade of events can begin to occur, including the flow of real wealth toward the state’s treasury, an influx of banking business from outside of the state – as people in other states carry out their desire to bank with sound money – and an eventual outcry against the use of Federal Reserve notes for any transactions.

University of Houston political science professor Brandon Rottinghaus called development of a state gold depository a step toward independence.

This is another in a long line of ways to make Texas more self-reliant and less tethered to the federal government. The financial impact is small but the political impact is telling, Many conservatives are interested in returning to the gold standard and circumvent the Federal reserve in whatever small way they can.

The Texas gold depository will create a mechanism to challenge the federal government’s monopoly on money, and provides a blueprint for other states to follow. If the majority of states controlled their own supply of gold, it could conceivably make the Federal Reserve completely irrelevant.

State bullion depositories are one of four steps states can take to help bring down the Fed.

Read More At: ActivistPost.com
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Michael Maharrey [send him email] is the Communications Director for the Tenth Amendment Center, where this article first appeared. He proudly resides in the original home of the Principles of ’98 – Kentucky. See his blog archive here and his article archive here.He is the author of the book, Our Last Hope: Rediscovering the Lost Path to Liberty. You can visit his personal website at MichaelMaharrey.com and like him on Facebook HERE

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Dr. Farell Analyzes New Legislation Considered In Texas, Gold, Silver, Bretton Woods, Cashless Society & More

Source: GizaDeathStar.com
Dr. Joseph P. Farrell
May 4, 2017

The state of Texas is joining other American states in considering legislation to recognize gold and silver coins as legitimate currency; while the revolt against the Fed is growing…there’s a problem… (copy and paste into your browser): http://thefreethoughtproject.com/texa…

Fort Worth sending help to fight deadly Panhandle wildfires

A fire near Dumas in the Panhandle on Monday.
Source: Star-telegram.com
March 7, 2017

Three firefighters and two brush trucks from Fort Worth are heading to the Texas Panhandle, where massive wildfires have killed at least four people and burned more than 400,000 acres of land.

The crew from Fort Worth is part of the Texas Instrastate Fire Mutual Aid System deployed by Gov. Greg Abbott.

Four people died overnight Monday from large fires in Gray County and Lipscomb County, west and northwest of Amarillo, according to the Amarillo Globe-News.

Cody Crockett and Sydney Wallace died trying to herd cattle away from the flames, the newspaper reported.

Sloan Everett, another rancher, also died in Gray County. Cade Koch, 25, died in Lipscomb County, according to the Globe-News.

The Texas A&M Forest Service responded to three major fires Monday near the areas of Perryton, Dumas and Lefors, according to a news release. Hundreds of homes have been threatened and two homes have been reported destroyed.

Winds should calm down Wednesday but elevated fire conditions should return Thursday and through the weekend, the news release said.

Two other people have died in wildfires in Kansas, Oklahoma and Colorado this week, according to the Associated Press.

Arizona & Utah Legislating For Specie…

Source: GizaDeathStar.com
Dr. Joseph P. Farrell Ph.D.
February 11, 2017

Last Thursday on my News and Views from the Nefarium I noted something of major geopolitical consequence as major Japanese banks were joining the CIPS (China International Payment System) of financial clearing, bypassing SWIFT (Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunications) and therefore the US dollar. This, in my opinion, was a geopolitical-financial earthquake. We have yet to see the fall0ut from this, but over the next few years I suspect we will, as other nations in the BRICSA bloc join and participate. China will couple this (obviously) to its Silk Road project, so one can except individual nations to participate, particularly those involved in China’s Asia Infrastructure Investment Bank. Watch for Great Britain to do the same, thus straddling both the Western and Asian systems.

All this is to say that “something is up” in the financial world. For example, there’s the story that Germany has completed its gold repatriation, three years ahead of time. Some who sent me this article suggested that this “speed up” may be due to the pressures on Germany’s largest, and one of the world’s largest, banks, Deutsche Bank. But there are other clues that “something is up”. Recall that last year we occasionally blogged about the story that the American state of Texas had legislated the creation of a state bullion depository, and additionally, that Texas was, like Germany, seekiing to repatriate its own bullion stocks from the Fed to the state, presumably to its bullion depository.

Well, now you can add Arizona and Utah to that mix – at least, tentatively:

Utah Bill Sets Stage For State Gold Depository, Further Encourages Use Of Metals As Money

Arizona Committee Passes Bill To Support Sound Money

http://www.activistpost.com/2017/02/arizona-committee-passes-bill-support-sound-money.html/embed#?secret=6DVqHf4Sgm

If both states pass their measures, the this would be two American states with state bullion depositories, and Arizona would join several states which have passed bills reaffirming that specie money is constitutional money and legal tender; most of those states that have passed similar measures, if memory serves me correctly(!), are in the upper plains states.

In any case, the real question here is what all of this means. And here I suspect that your high octane speculation is as good as mine. Firstly, there is the view that would hold that these states, like Germany, sense “something is up” and are building hedges and fences to insure their continued financial security. Secondly, there is a view that would see these moves as more indications that the US federal “one size fits all” political and financial institutions are breaking down, and that these states are taking measure to protect themselves. There is much to commend this view, as already state and municipal retirement pension funds are under severe pressure. In California the mathematics is undeniable, notwithstanding the make-believe world that Sacramento seems to live in: the state is facing a long-term financial “Situation” that is not good. The word hasn’t been used yet, but think “Greece” and “tonsorial parlors” and you get the idea. Thirdly, closely allied with this view is that idea which holds that the union is, indeed, breaking apart under a variety of pressures, many financial, and many the much more intangible but profound cultural divisions. A glance at the county-by-county maps of past federal elections tells the story: the progressive left thrives on the coasts and in the urban centers, while the more traditional right thrives in the rest of the country, in mid-sized urban areas and rural areas. Fourthly, and now entering the world of “high octane speculation,” bullion depositories and specie strike a direct blow not only against the centralized banking and financial system of the west, but the “cashless society” plans of Mr. Globaloney, for such money protects individual privacy and sovereignty. But specie also promotes not only anonymity, but given the fact that these states are in the US southwest, they could be positioning themselves for a much bolder presence on the global stage, for like it or not, even Mr. Globaloney likes bullion. Specie enable international trade, especially in an environment when there is increasing pressure on the US dollar’s reserve currency status. Fifthly, and also in the realm of “high octane speculation,” there is also a diametrically opposite possibility: by opening depositories, the could be a covert scheme to have all the bullion in private hands deposited… and then seized in those “tonsorial parlor” maneuvers we’ve seen before in history: the banksters have a variety of euphemisms for the procedure, but in the end it amounts to mere theft.

And a final thought:

Read More At: GizaDeathStar.com
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About Joseph P. Farrell

Joseph P. Farrell has a doctorate in patristics from the University of Oxford, and pursues research in physics, alternative history and science, and “strange stuff”. His book The Giza DeathStar, for which the Giza Community is named, was published in the spring of 2002, and was his first venture into “alternative history and science”.

Another Amairakuhn Edgykayshun Rant…But Not From Me…

Source: GizaDeathStar.com
Dr. Joseph Farrell
January 16, 2017

It’s time for my first rant of the new year on Amairikuhn edgykayshun, and it’s a doozie.

When Ms. K.B. sent me this article, I just had to laugh, and I knew I just had to pass it along to all the teachers that are part of the regular readership here, who are fed up with the constant centralization and federalization of Amairikuhn edgykayshun, and the constant tilt of the insanity meter into the red kooky zone of the dial. Apparently things are so bad in Amairikuhn edgykayshun, standardized testing, and the whole Rotten to the (Common) Core experience that even the corporate controlled media, in this case, the Washington Post, are sitting up and taking notice, and that’s, well, bad, or rather, just how bad things really are. Don’t believe me? Read for yourself, and remember, this is the Washington Post:

Poet: I can’t answer questions on Texas standardized tests about my own poems

Sara Holbrook, the poet in question, notes that the State of Texas chose one of what she herself calls one of her “most neurotic” poems, and goes on to observe what doubtless became a standard response of the students taking the test:

Let me begin by confessing that “A Real Case” is my most neurotic poem. I have a pile of them to be sure, but this one is the sour cherry on top. The written evidence of my anxieties, those evil gremlins that ride around on tricycles in my mind shooting my self-confidence with water pistols. How in the name of all that’s moldy did this poem wind up on a proficiency test?

Dose of reality: test makers are for-profit organizations. My poems are a whole lot cheaper than Mary Oliver’s or Jane Kenyon’s, so there’s that. But how would your vulnerable, nervous, number two pencil-gripping seventh grade self have felt opening your test packet to analyze poetic lines such as this:

I’m just down with a sniffly case/of sudden-self-loathing-syndrome … an unexpected extra serving/ of just-for-now-self-hate.

Seriously? Hundreds of my poems in print and they choose THAT one? Self-loathing and self-hate? Kids need an extra serving of those emotions on testing day?

But wait, it gets – as you might suspect about any story about Amairikuhn edgykayshun – much worse.

Teachers are also trying to survive as they are tasked with teaching kids how to take these tests, which they do by digging through past tests, posted online. Forget joy of language and the fun of discovery in poetry, this is line-by-line dissection, painful and delivered without anesthetic. One teacher wrote to me last month, working after 10 p.m., trying to figure out the test maker’s interpretation of my poem “Midnight.” This poem isn’t quite as jarring as “A Real Case,” simply symptomatic of aforementioned neuroses: It’s about insomnia.

“Hello Mrs. Holbrook. My name is Sean, and I’m an 8th grade English teacher in Texas. I’m attempting to decipher the number of stanzas in your poem, ‘Midnight’. This isn’t clear from the formatting in our most recent benchmark. The assessment asks the following question:

“Dividing the poem into two stanzas allows the poet to―

  1. A) compare the speaker’s schedule with the train’s schedule.

B ) ask questions to keep the reader guessing about what will happen

  1. C) contrast the speaker’s feelings about weekends and Mondays
  2. D) incorporate reminders for the reader about where the action takes place.

The answer is C) to contrast the speaker’s feelings about weekends and Mondays.

How many stanzas are in this poem? Where are they located? I would appreciate your help. Thank you so much!”

Oh, goody. I’m a benchmark. Only guess what? The test prep materials neglected to insert the stanza break. I texted him an image of how the poem appeared in the original publication. Problem one solved. But guess what else? I just put that stanza break in there because when I read it aloud (I’m a performance poet), I pause there. Note: that is not an option among the answers because no one ever asked me why I did it.
(Emphasis added)

Say what? the “professional” quackademic and (always) anonymous test-making committee did not even bother to contact the poet herself to query her about her own intentions and meanings and why she composed her poem in a certain way, with certain stanza breaks, images, diction, and so on and simply imposed their own consensus “correct answer” on the test (and therefore, on the poet herself about her own work)? Why, I thought (and was actually taught back in the day when schools actually taught things like how to do proper academic research) that when one was doing things like, oh, say literary criticism and analysis of, oh, say a text by someone that was, oh, say, like you know, like still alive that it was, like (notice my attempt to be trendy and, like, with it and use accepted colloquial, like, diction, ya know?) a nice idea to, like, contact the authoroid (note my attempt to be, like, gender-neutral here because, like, terms like author and authoress are so, like sexist and, like, stuff) and find out what it (like, notice again how, like, politically correct I’m being, as I, like, virtue signal my raised like consciousness and stuff by adhering to an artificial, like, linguistic agenda like thing, ya know?) like intended?

Well, of course they did. That’s the name of the testing game: imposed anonymous consensus. The actual authoroids be damned/recommended for retraining at a continuing teacher education workshop.

Apparently, Ms. Holbrook has the same issues as I and many others do with these absurd guessing games called standardized tests, and she proposed her own question:

Meantime, here is my question:

  1. Does this guessing game mostly evidence:

A    the literacy mastery of the student?

B    the competency of the student’s teacher?

C    the absurdity of the questions?

D    the fact that the poet, although she has never put her head in an oven, definitely has issues.

Let’s go with D since I definitely have issues, including issues with these ridiculous test questions.

Well, I could think of a few standardized test questions of my own for the quackademics preparing such tests, but since we all know that they probably all have a degree abbreviation that probably includes “Ed.” somewhere in it, I won’t bother you with them.

Holbrook goes on to note the same complaints others have noted about the testing “business”, Todd Farley included(and if you don’t know Farley’s book, which my co-author Gary Lawrence and I reviewed briefly in our book Rotten to the (Common) Core, I urge you to read it, for its sheer hilarity about the testing business):

The same year that “Midnight” appeared on the STAAR test (2013), Texas paid Pearson some $500 million to administer the tests, reportedly without proper training to monitor the contract. Test scorers, who are routinely hired from ads on (where else?), Craiglist, also receive scant training, as reported by this seasoned test scorer. I’m not sure what the qualifications are for the people who make up the questions, but the ability to ride unicorns comes to mind.

Holbrook, with her unicorns comment, probably is unaware of Farley’s book, but it actually is much worse than riding unicorns, since Farley documents case after case of such scorers sitting around and debating the acceptable, and non-acceptable, adjectives for the flavors of pizza, ice cream, and whether the proper words for certain chemical reactions is “fizzles”, “fizzes”, “splatters,” and so on.

It’s that bad, folks, and that nutty. And that real.

But Holbrook points out something equally nutty, and when I read this, and her conclusions about all this nonsense, I had to give her three cheers (and the Washington Post two cheers just for the guts it took to report her story):

Now comes research that reveals that a simple demographic study of the wealth of the parents could have accurately predicted the outcomes, no desks or test packets needed.  Educator and author Peter Greene reports,

“Put another way, Tienken et. al. have demonstrated that we do not need to actually give the Common Core-linked Big Standardized Test in order to generate the “student achievement” data, because we can generate the same data by looking at demographic information all by itself.

Tienken and his team used just three pieces of demographic data—

1. percentage of families in the community with income over $200K

2. percentage of people in the community in poverty

3. percentage of people in community with bachelor’s degrees

Using that data alone, Tienken was able to predict school district test results accurately in most cases.”

And voila! we don’t even have to administer those costly tests, nor pay for them. We can just study the demographics and assign district test scores based on that! (And just wait folks, it won’t be long until some genius in Washington will actually think that’s a good idea, and that we should distribute grades accordingly). Since we’re talking “distribution” here, I suspect this will come from the kooky socialist snowflakes of the political left. However, chances are equally good that the hysterical lunatics of the political right will – I’m thinking of John McCain or Lindsay Graham here – will think it’s a good idea because it will save money.

Ms. Holbrook ends her sortie into the hallowed halls of Amairikuhn quackademia with this conclusion and prognosis:

The only way to stop this nonsense is for parents to stand up and say, no more. No more will I let my kid be judged by random questions scored by slackers from Craigslist while I pay increased taxes for results that could just as easily have been predicted by an algorithm. That’s not education, that’s idiotic.

Idiotic, hair-splitting questions pertaining to nothing, insufficient training, profit-driven motives on the part of the testing companies, and test results that simply reveal the income and education level of the parents – For this we need to pay hundreds of millions of dollars and waste 10-45 days of classroom time each year to administer them? More if you consider the amount of days spent in test prep?

To that conclusion, Ms. Holbrook, I can only add my own hearty “Hear Hear!”

The only question remains how would we ever sell such an idea to the corrupt wankers in the Demoratic and Republithug parties?

I know! Why not blame standardized testing and failing American education on that evil-Machiavellian-super-genius-that-is-behind-everything, Vladimir Putin, and the ongoing Russian interference with American testing scores and hacking the computers that grade them and infiltrating the testing companies’ “scorers” with sleeper cell speznaz units, a plot hatched by Sergei Lavrov in always-Byzantine-never-to-be-trusted-heart-of-evil-neo-Stalinist-Putinist-Russia!!?? Throw in a couple of memes about Chinese hackers, and with a few faked (and of course, Top Secret) investigations and appropriate pronouncements in the press, it’s a sure thing. A Russian standardized testing-hacking plot will be something that Demorats and Republithugs and corporate media could all agree on.

Like, ya know?

See you on the, like, flip side…

Read More At: GizaDeathStar.com
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About Joseph P. Farrell

Joseph P. Farrell has a doctorate in patristics from the University of Oxford, and pursues research in physics, alternative history and science, and “strange stuff”. His book The Giza DeathStar, for which the Giza Community is named, was published in the spring of 2002, and was his first venture into “alternative history and science”.

Book Review: LBJ & The Conspiracy To Kill Kennedy – A Coalescence Of Interests by Dr. Joseph P. Farrell

lbjknd
TheBreakaway
Zy Marquiez
November 22, 2016

LBJ & The Conspiracy To Kill Kennedy by Dr. Joseph P. Farrell is a landmark book into the conspiracy/coup d’etat that killed President Kennedy.

The main strength of this book is that it seeks to reverse engineer the threads of evil that wielded their ways in order to carry out one of the greatest conspiracies in modern times.

Without a doubt, this is a landmark book in every sense of the word.

In the nascent stage of this book Farrell makes it a point to lay the foundation for the methodology of the events that took place.  This helps the reader understand the angle he is going to take.

Beyond that, however, Farrell goes above and beyond what any average researcher does.  In his usual methodical, leave-no-stone-unturned fashion, Farrell not only analyzes the coalescence of interests that had a hand in the assassination – FBI, CIA, Banksters, Nazis, Masons, Mafia, Big Oil, The Military, The Secret Service – but further distills these to the deep core nexus that arguably played the most prominent roles in the assassination of President Kennedy.

Furthermore, and most importantly, Farrell, in harpoon-like fashion homes in on the most devious of all public players that played a notable role in the architecture of the conspiracy: Lyndon B. Johnson.

At minimum, the turn-coat and traitor Johnson cast his tentacles all over the official “investigation” derailing the possibility of any semblance of truth from rising to the foreground.

As Farrell notes:

“…it is certainly clear that Johnson, by his policies and behaviors after the assassination, acted as if he knew who was ultimately behind the murder, for at every turn, he acted in their interest as well as his own, in suppressing any evidence tending to incriminate him, or them.  Nowhere more did he do this more clearly than in his selection of those members of the Warren Commission itself.”[1]

What this book does is not only destroy the official story, which admittedly has been done by many other researchers, but also takes it a few steps beyond that into the realm of deeper and darker elements.  Elements that made it a point not only to carry out arguably the conspiracy of the century, but also transformed the consciousness of Americans and infused enough trauma into the social psyche the likes of which western society had not witness in modern times.  Such is the signature of those that slither behind the scenes.

With everything noted, and still so much left unsaid, everyone would be served well to read this book.  The value this book offers not only in understanding what took place that day, but the coup d’etat that took place  will help one understand why we are witnessing many of the issues we are in our society, and why things haven’t changed.  That alone should be reason enough, but the book offers countless more reasons for one to read it, as all of Farrell’s book do.

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Source:

[1] Dr. Joseph P. Farrell, LBJ & The Conspiracy To Kill Kennedy – A Coalescence Of Interests, pg. 285.