Off grid living: Grow 25 pounds of sweet potatoes in a bucket

Image: Off grid living: Grow 25 pounds of sweet potatoes in a bucket
Source: NaturalNews.com
Amy Goodrich
March 5, 2017

Although sweet potatoes are an important staple food for Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners, this versatile, orange root tuber can be added to many other meals all year round. While sweet potatoes have been used for ages by many cultures around the world, until recently they weren’t a regular sight on American kitchen tables outside of the Holiday season.

In the past decade, however, the sweet potato has found its way to our hearts. According to the Agricultural Marketing Resource Center, the root vegetable’s popularity has skyrocketed between 2000 and 2014, with its consumption increasing by nearly 80 percent. And for a good reason; sweet potatoes pack a powerful nutritional punch.

They are loaded with essential micronutrients to promote overall health and have fewer calories than ordinary potatoes. Essential nutrients found in sweet potatoes include fiber, protein, beta-carotene, vitamin C, manganese, potassium, and many vitamins of the B-complex.

What’s more, you actually don’t need a big garden or a lot of space to grow your own supply of sweet potatoes. Read on to find out how to grow sweet potatoes at your home.

Easy steps to grow sweet potatoes in a bucket

  1. Select the right sweet potato – Rooted sweet potatoes will give you the best result since you can be sure that they are not treated with pesticides to stop the sprouting process.
  2. Create some heat – Unlike regular potatoes, sweet potatoes love the heat. While sweet potatoes will still grow at a minimum temperature of 50 °F (10°C), they seem to do much better at room temperature. So, if you live in a colder climate, make sure to keep them indoors.
  3. Prepare a 5-gallon bucket – Once you have selected the right sprouted potato, fill a container that has draining holes in the bottom with moist soil. Plant one potato per 5-gallon bucket, tops exposed.
  4. Waiting for “slips” to emerge – After a while, green shoots or slips will start to grow out of the sweet potato. This step will take about 90 days.
  5. Transplant the slips – Once the slips are big enough, about 6 to 12 inches, it is time to gently remove them from the sweet potato and transplant them to a larger 20-gallon container. In each 20-gallon container, you can plant six sweet potato slips.
  6. Pick the right season – As mentioned before, sweet potatoes are a heat-loving plant. If you are planning to grown them outdoors, make sure the last frost of spring has already passed. Late spring is the ideal time of the year. Also, make sure they stay well-watered.
  7. Harvest time – After about 3 to 4 months – or when the leaves and vines start to turn yellow – you can start digging up the sweet potatoes. If you grow outdoors, this is usually just after the first frost. After digging up the sweet potatoes, shake off any excess dirt, but do not wash them with water as sweet potatoes need a curing process to create their delicious, sweet taste.
  8. Cure sweet potatoes – Next to enhancing their flavor, curing allows a second skin to form over scratches and bruises you made while digging up the potatoes. This protective layer makes it possible to store sweet potatoes at room temperature for up to a year. To cure, store the harvested tubers in a warm, humid place (80°F or 27°C) for two weeks.

As reported by Off The Grid News, bucket-grown sweet potatoes will have a yield of about 25 pounds for each 20-gallon container. (RELATED: Find more information about off-the-grid living at OffGrid.news.)

Read More At: NaturalNews.com

Sources:

TrueActivist.com

AGMRC.org

WHFoods.com

Almanac.com

Organic Sweet Potato Container Harvest: Basic Growing Details & Container Sizes

Source: TheRustedGarden
Gary Pilarchik
October 17, 2016

These were planted in the container soil late May and grew for about 150 days. They love the heat. Loose soil, organic fertilizer, drainage and two containers sizes set up the harvest. I show you the harvest (see if you like the outcome to try it) and talk about the basic set up. If you want to grow your own sweet potato slips/plants indoors, a link is provided.

Check out my vegetable gardening blog: The Rusted Garden. It is filled with garden information, videos, pictures, seed catalogs and seeds & things I sell. http://www.therustedgarden.blogspot.com

Top 14 Fall Superfoods You Can Try

Source: Mercola
Dr. Mercola
September 16, 2016

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/cur… Brussels sprouts, apples, sweet potatoes, pomegranates, turnips, and pumpkins are some of the top fall superfoods you can try.

Sweet Potato Slip [Update]

By: Zy Marquiez
January 2, 2016

Two weeks ago or so, new pictures were taken of the Sweet Potato Slip Project that is being done as a trial run for next year’s growing season.

In our last update, we showed how well the sweet potato slips had been doing.

There were a total of eleven sweet potato slips that were born before. A week ago, five more were brought into the fold for a total of sixteen little rascals.

The picture of the new ones are below.

SPL1

Around the same time that the pictures were taken, four of the slips were looking a little off so to speak, and the color wasn’t as vibrant as they were originally. Some seemed to be changing to greenish yellow. They are still around, but they just don’t look as healthy.

SPL2

Other than that, the whole process has been fairly straight forward.   As time passes, more information will be logged in order to finish tracking the progression of this step in the growing process to have better discernment for next year.

This is a new experience for me regarding organic sweet potatoes, and certainly don’t have a greenthumb like some of my friends [yet!], but it has been a great one nonetheless.

As a side note, started a Garlic experiment about a month ago and will be writing about that soon.

Hope you are all doing well and good luck in your gardening/learning.

Continuing Sweet Potato Slips

By: Zy Marquiez
December 8, 2015

In our previous blog regarding this topic, we showed what we were up to with a little experiment regarding sweet potato slips possibly for next year.

With that said, we’re now six weeks from the nascent stages of the experiment.  The bad news is, that one of the two original momma sweet potatoes went on strike for low wages.  The great news is that the one that didn’t, proliferated like it was a harem of rabbits.

Three days after our previous post, two more slips were moved into mason jars.  Those weren’t documented via photography though.  However, in this latest batch we have a few photos to share the progression of the sweet potatoes.

The photos will show the original sweet potato from whom the slips are being born from.  There in we have the four original slips from the first batch, and the second two slips that weren’t cataloged.  Finally, we have the new batch of five slips to add to the bunch for a total of eleven.

SP1
Above we have the original sweet potato [second from right], with the first and second batch of slips.

SP2To the right we now have the original ‘momma’ sweet potato in all her infinite glory.

Below you have the root system of all of the sweet potato slips that have been moved from the first and the second batches.

All in all, considering that they have gotten no sunlight whatsoever, and luckily it has required minimal attention, the slips and the mother seem to be doing great.  We’ll see how many more slips the future holds.

SP3

The last picture shows shows the five new plants with the mother on the left.  Hopefully the experiment continues to go well.

SP4

Below follow the videos that prompted the idea for this experiment, and hopefully we can continue to learn/progress as time goes by.

If you happen to have any insights to have, it is always greatly appreciated.

Harvesting Sweet Potatoes / Starting Sweet Potato Slips

Starting on October 23, 2015 we opted to follow the tips of the first video provided below, and the following illustration is how the Sweet Potato slips looked after about a month.

We figured we would run this experiment now, before next year’s growing season to see what was possible with Organic Sweet Potatoes sourced from the store.  As you can see, the one on the right has produced many stalks while the one on the right has underperformed, although this is our FIRST experiment.

L1

The second picture below are the stalks as they are going to be kept to see how they grow over the next 30-60 days in order to better ascertain what to expect this year.   It’s just an experiment, but we’ll see where this goes.

L2