How Antidepressants Affect The Brain & Make People More Likely To Kill

[Editor’s Note]

For more information regarding this the countless issues with antidepressants please read:

A Mind Of Your Own: The Truth About Depression & How Women Can Reclaim Their Lives by Dr. Kelly Brogan
Toxic Psychiatry – Dr. Peter R. Breggin

Antidepressants
Source: NaturalNews.com
Ethan A. Huff
July 25, 2016

Thinking back to all the different mass shooting cases we’ve covered over the years, you may have noticed that there almost always seems to be one common denominator: the use of psychotropic medications by the perpetrators. Brain-altering antidepressant drugs are so often linked to cases of extreme violence these days that these drug-induced stupors, if you will, have been officially pathologized under the name “akathisia.”

In Greek, the term literally means “inability to sit,” and is a neuropsychiatric syndrome characterized by “subjective and objective psychomotor restlessness,” according to Dr. Fernando Espi Forcen, M.D., a Fellow of Psychosomatic Medicine at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Put simply, akathisia is an unusually altered state of mind that, in some extreme cases, can cause an individual to become preoccupied with thoughts of violence, whether against himself or someone else.

The ongoing trial of Richard Henry Bain is a great example of how akathisia is gaining legal precedence as a trigger of violent crime. Though he’s being accused of first-degree murder in the infamous election night shooting in Quebec back in 2012, Bain’s lawyers say that his use of antidepressant drugs is to blame for the crime, and thus Bain shouldn’t be held legally liable.

Whether or not this is a valid defense is up to the judge in this particular case to decide. But the fact that akathisia is now a “thing” in the realm of the criminal justice system begs the question: what exactly is it? And more precisely, how is it possible for antidepressant drugs to so alter someone’s state of mind that he becomes unable to control a sudden urge to harm himself or others?

Some people metabolize drugs differently, more quickly than others

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) admitted back in 2004 that SSRIs, SNRIs and other “new generation” antidepressants like the kind Bain was using can, in fact, worsen depression symptoms, and in some cases cause users to become suicidal or homicidal. The agency three years later issued a “Black Box” warning for these same antidepressants, suggesting that all users up to age 24 be monitored for extreme side effects including agitation, panic attacks, anxiety, hostility, impulsivity and akathisia.

As to why these drugs do this, researchers say it’s predicated upon a variance in how they’re metabolized by individual users. So-called “ultra-rapid metabolizers,” for instance, absorb the drugs’ active ingredients much more quickly than others, putting them at a higher risk of experiencing wild behavioral and mental fluctuations. There’s also the genetic factor; certain gene variations can precipitate variances in how antidepressant drugs affect users’ brain chemistry.

“Fast-changing levels of psychotropic substances, up or down, can cause behavioural changes as the neurotransmitters in the brain react to reach some equilibrium,” a paper entitled Study 329 explains about the chemical process. “This phenomenon makes starting and stopping medication the most dangerous times for suicide and violence, but both can happen at any time, with stress, provocation, dose change, addition or subtraction of a medication.”

Antidepressants operate within very specific biological pathways, the balances of which can easily be thrown off, depending on a person’s unique biological and genetic makeup. Antidepressants have also been shown to cause long-term brain damage, affecting the intermolecular interactions in such a way as to completely alter brain chemistry, possibly permanently.

Read More At: NaturalNews.com

Bombshell Study Admits Antidepressants Increase Suicide Attempts In Teens & Are Completely Worthless For Treating Depression

Antidepressants
Source: NaturalNews.com
Julie Wilson
June 13, 2016

A bombshell study published in the medical journal The Lancet admits what Natural News and others in the holistic health community have been reporting for years: antidepressants kill. On Wednesday, researchers published the most comprehensive analysis to date of the safety and efficacy of widely prescribed antidepressants in children and teens.

What they found is that the majority of antidepressants prescribed to young people have far more risks than benefits, doing essentially nothing to ease symptoms of depression, while significantly increasing suicidal thoughts and suicide attempts, CBS News is reporting.

Out of 14 antidepressants analyzed by researchers, only one – fluoxetine (marketed under the name Prozac and Sarafem) – proved effective for relieving symptoms of depression better than a placebo pill. Venlafaxine (Effexor), on the other hand, was shown to increase the risk of suicidal tendencies in children and teens compared to a placebo and five other antidepressants.

The study results are major considering the fact that antidepressant use among young people is at an all-time high. Shockingly, children under 5-years-old are the fastest growing group being prescribed mind-altering drugs.

Most antidepressants do NOTHING to help depression, study finds

Antidepressant use among children and teens rose from 1.3 to 1.6 percent between 2005 and 2012, according to a separate study published in The Lancet.

As the authors of this latest study confirm, the implications of drugging children with powerful, mind-altering drugs is completely unpredictable, which is why international guidelines encourage doctors to use non-drug approaches including “cognitive behavioral or interpersonal therapy.”

Lead study author Dr. Andrea Cipriani says that because brains in children and teens are not yet developed, it’s important to lead with caution when prescribing medication, “because we don’t know the potential implications in the long term … .”

The U.S National Institutes of Health estimates that some 2.8 million children (or about 11 percent) between the ages of 12 and 17 have suffered from at least one episode of depression, for which we now know that antidepressant drugs are totally worthless.

Dr. Cipriani explains that depression in children differs widely from that of adults. “Not only is it still under-diagnosed and under-treated but also it tends to present in a different way,” he said. “Depressive symptoms in children and adolescents are rather undifferentiated. You notice more irritability, aggressive behavior and problems at school. And consequences of depressive episodes in children and adolescents are dramatic because they include impairments in their social functioning but also an increased risk of suicidal ideation and attempts.”

FDA privy to antidepressant harm in children for decades

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has known for more than a decade that antidepressants pose immense harm to patients, particularly children, which is why it implemented “black box” warnings in 2004 for users under the age of 24. The labels clearly state that the drugs up your chances of becoming suicidal or intensify preexisting suicidal thoughts and behavior.

Yet, irresponsible physicians continue to push harmful drugs on children and teens that alter brain chemistry. Not only that, but doctors are increasingly prescribing the drugs for off-label uses.

This was substantiated just weeks ago in a study published in the May issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), which found that nearly half of people prescribed antidepressants aren’t even depressed.

After analyzing a decade of antidepressant prescription records, researchers concluded that only 55 percent were given for depression, while the remaining 45 percent was written for conditions such as anxiety, sleeping problems, pain, panic disorders and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Doctors prescribing depression pills for pretty much anything

Other off-label uses include digestive problems, eating disorders, migraines and menopausal symptoms. Twenty-nine percent of antidepressant prescriptions were written for off-label uses. The study authors expressed grave concerns about the fact that these drugs, which are proven to be dangerous, are being prescribed for conditions for which there is no evidence supporting their efficacy, or safety for that matter.

The reason doctors are pushing unproven drugs, is because they’re being advised to do so by Big Pharma, and not by scientific research, said the study authors.

Further illustrating just how worthless these drugs are, medical researcher Peter Gotzsche said last year that nearly all psychiatric drugs, including antidepressants, could be withdrawn from the market without damaging public health. In fact, he recommends it.

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