While Trump Was In Riyadh Dancing & Selling Arms, This Was Happening…


Source: GizaDeathStar.com
Dr. Joseph P. Farrell Ph.D.
May 31, 2017

Normally I do not use or go to this source, but in this case I make an exception, since it highlights the fundamental problem with the US Empire’s foreign policy: it is ossified, and completely backward looking. Indeed, by tying it to a regressive and backward looking country like Suadi Arabia, Mr. Trump may have committed a strategic error that will affect Americans, Saudis, and for that matter, Arabs elsewhere, for generations to come. My thoughts about the implications of his trip, and the ambiguous long term rationale behind it, were expressed, albeit somewhat clumsily, in last Thursday’s News and Views from the Nefarium.

This piece, however, which was shared by Mr. H.B., highlights the problem: while Mr. Trump was dancing with a few backward Saudi tribesmen, Mr. Xi was hosting a large gathering of nations in Beijing to expand the economic cooperation of the BRICSA bloc, and to work out details of building out China’s New Silk Road project:

https://www.technocracy.news/index.php/2017/05/21/world-leaders-gather-beijing-us-sinks-irrelevancy/

Note, the following:

Even countries that are cool on the Chinese initiative, including India and Japan, sent representatives to the summit that carried a bit more clout than the pathetic representation of the United States, Matt Pottinger, a little-known special assistant to Trump and the senior director for East Asia of National Security Council. In fact, the only reason Trump sent anyone to represent the United States at the Beijing gathering was because of a special request made by President Xi during his recent meeting with Trump at the president’s private Mar-a-Lago Club resort in Palm Beach, Florida.

South Korea, which saw relations with China sour over America’s placement of Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) missile system in South Korea, sent a delegation to Beijing after a phone call between South Korea’s new liberal president, Moon Jae-in, and President Xi. Moon responded to the phone call by sending a delegation led by his Democratic Party’s veteran legislator to Beijing.

Even North Korea, which rankled South Korea, Japan, and the United States by firing a ballistic missile into waters near Russia, sent a delegation to the Beijing meeting headed by Kim Yong Jae, the North’s Minister of External Economic Relations. The Trump administration, which sent a virtual unknown to Beijing, complained loudly about North Korea’s representation at the Silk Road summit. But Washington’s complaint was conveyed by someone as unknown as Mr. Pottinger, Anna Richey-Allen, a low-level spokesperson for the U.S. State Department’s East Asia Bureau. The reason why the United States is being spoken for by middle-grade bureaucrats is that the nation that still believes it is the world’s only remaining «superpower» is now governed by an administration rife with top-level vacancies, inter-agency squabbling, and amateur league players.

Yes, that’s right: Japan, India, North and South Korea, all sent high level delegations.

So did eastern Europe:

These EU member state leaders included Italian Prime Minister Paolo Gentiloni, Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy, Polish Prime Minister Beata Szydlo, Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras, Czech President Milos Zeman, and Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban. Moreover, had British Prime Minister Theresa May not been in the middle of a general election campaign, she would have been in Beijing. Nevertheless, she sent British Chancellor of the Exchequer Philip Hammond in her place.

As did the following institutions and other countries:

The United Nations Secretary General, Antonio Guterres, was there, along with the President of the World Bank Jim Yong Kim and International Monetary Fund Managing Director Christine Lagarde. Also present in Beijing were the presidents of Turkey, Philippines, Argentina, Chile, Indonesia, Kyrgyzstan, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Switzerland, Kenya, Uzbekistan, and Laos, as well as the prime ministers of Vietnam, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Serbia, Malaysia, Mongolia, Fiji, Ethiopia, Cambodia, and Myanmar.

Ministerial delegations from Afghanistan, Australia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Brazil, Egypt, Finland, Iran, Kuwait, Lebanon, Maldives, Romania, Nepal, New Zealand, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, South Sudan, Sudan, Syria, Tanzania, Thailand, Tunisia, Uganda, and the United Arab Emirates were at the Beijing summit. Japan was represented by the senior adviser to Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and Secretary General of the Liberal Democratic Party, Toshihiro Nikai. France, which was experiencing a change of presidents, sent former Prime Minister Jean-Pierre Raffarin.

The Silk Road initiative has projects planned in all the nations whose governments were represented in Beijing, except for the United States and Israel. In addition to the nations represented by their government heads of state and ministers, Silk Road agreements were signed between China and Palestine, Georgia, Armenia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Albania, Tajikistan, Brunei, Croatia, and East Timor.

But, hey, according to former House Speaker Newt Gangrene…er… Gingrich, the USA can herald the new foreign policy triumph of Mr. Trump selling one hundred billion plus dollars to the (out)house of Saud as a major foreign policy shift and breakthrough.

Have we really lost our collective minds to this degree? Granted the regime of China leaves much much to be desired, as do the regimes of many of the countries represented in Beijing. But they are agreed, it seems – even the Japanese and North and South Koreans, heck, even the Saudis smelled the coffee and sent a delegation – on one thing, and that’s getting something done that will benefit everyone, like building railroads and highways and so on.

While the USSA is selling arms, and the means to manufacture them.

I don’t think for a moment that Mr. Xi is so naive to believe that all of these countries get along with each other, or don’t have competing interests.Nor do I think Mr. Xi is so naive as to believe that a conference this large, with this many in attendance, will really accomplish anything, much less bring everyone together in a group hug and kumbaya moment. We’ve all been to those “required meetings”. They do nothing but waste time, solve or settle little, and accomplish even less. But they do do one thing, and that is they simply get people talking about and thinking about certain things, and then, when enough of a critical mass of thought congeals, about doing and accomplishing them. That, it seems, is part of his – and China’s – cultural and economic strategy: simply generate excitement about accomplishing something and getting it done. Already in the past few months we’ve seen the first freight train from China arrive in London, and return to China. Turn the clock back just ten years, and this would have been unthinkable. Now translate that into highways running from, say, Beijing to Berlin(dwarfing the Kaiser’s old Berlin-to-Baghdad railway), and you get the idea.

Meanwhile, we’re concerned about the peanuts of a mere one hundred billion of arms sales to the Saudis.

And that’s the point: Mr. Xi is offering the world a vision. We may not like Mr. Xi. We may not even like (I certainly don’t) Communism in any form, even the modern “benign” Chinese form (benign if one compares it to Mao, or Stalin). But Mr. Xi is offering a vision nonetheless. (Heck, being a [much out of practice] organist, I find it very interesting that China seems to be on a pipe-organ-building spree and the Chinese appear to be enjoying what, for them, is an [increasingly less] rare instrument. Translation: China is also trying to become a bridge or unifying culture.)

Now compare that to what the USSA is offering (which is what, exactly? Drones? Surveillance? Tanks? Bombs? bad refrigerators? shoddy computer software operating systems? pay for play bottomlessly corrupt politicians? pedophilia?) and you get the idea. We’re fast becoming as irrelevant and unwanted as the Yugo, the latest in Serbo-Croatian technology.

See you on the flip side…

Read More At: GizaDeathStar.com
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About Dr. Joseph P. Farrell

Joseph P. Farrell has a doctorate in patristics from the University of Oxford, and pursues research in physics, alternative history and science, and “strange stuff”. His book The Giza DeathStar, for which the Giza Community is named, was published in the spring of 2002, and was his first venture into “alternative history and science”.

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A New Asian Super-Power Grid: Japan Proposes It, And China Likes…

Source: GizaDeathStar.com
Dr. Joseph P. Farrell
November 21, 2016

Not all the big news during the last two weeks has been about space. There’s been another development, one apparently just starting, that probably has a few jaws on the floor in Singapore, Kuala Lumpur, Jakarta, Canberra, New Delhi, and a few other places. In fact, when Mr. J.H. shared this article, I had to read it a couple of times to make sure I wasn’t seeing things.:

Asian “super grid” the first step towards a global, interconnected, renewable energy grid

The essence of the idea is nothing less than a globally interconnected energy grid:

Clean, renewable energy will soon be cheaper than traditional polluting sources – but there’s still a big problem. It tends to get generated in inconvenient places, at inconvenient times that don’t necessarily match up with where it’s needed.

It’s simple enough; whenever there’s a big power load somewhere, there’s somewhere else in the world where that demand matches up with a generation spike. When it’s noon in the Gobi desert, and solar generation is at its peak, it’s dinner time in the UK and everyone’s boiling kettles.

The first step for GEIDCO is to build a connected Asia Super Grid that could bring the theoretically huge renewable energy generation capabilities of North China’s Gobi desert as far east as Japan.
(Emphasis added)

And there you have the essence of why my jaw was on the floor: a Chinese-Japanese integrated power grid, especially when the two counties have…well, a “history” in a little fracas called World War Two. And of course, the geopolitical history is hinted at here:

The first step for GEIDCO is to build a connected Asia Super Grid that could bring the theoretically huge renewable energy generation capabilities of North China’s Gobi desert as far east as Japan.

The entire idea is contingent on ultra high voltage power transmission lines, thousands of miles operating at more than 1,000 kilovolts AC/800 kilovolts DC. High voltages reduce losses over long distances, and both Russia and Japan already have hundreds (in Russia’s case thousands) of miles of ultra high voltage lines up and running. These pale in comparison to China’s infrastructure; since 2009 China has built nearly 10,000 miles of UHV power lines, with about the same again to come online in the next two years.

The larger GEIDCO’s interconnected web of renewable energy becomes, the more stable the supply is, because it’s less dependent on individual sources, so moving toward a global energy network that shares power from Greenland to South Africa, Australia to Switzerland is the ultimate goal.

But now there’s more information about all of this, in this article shared by Mr. P.K.:

https://cleantechnica.com/2016/09/21/china-japan-russia-south-korea-plan-renewable-energy-super-grid/embed/#?secret=t2Uahx4oBt

In the latter article you’ll note that Russia, South Korea, China and Japan have already signed a memorandum of understanding to create just such a grid:

Entrepreneurs in China, South Korea, Russia, and Japan have signed a Memorandum of Understanding that seeks to create the Asia Super Grid. It will transmit electrical power from renewable sources from areas of the world that are best able to produce it to consumers in other parts of the world. The idea is dependent on development of an ultra-high voltage grid operating at more than 1,000 kilovolts AC and 800 kilovolts DC over thousands of kilometers. It envisions interconnecting grids across regions, nations, and even continents with a capacity of over 10 gigawatts.

But notice also that the “brains” behind this effort are not just the Chinese, but a Japanese businessman:

The concept is the result of an idea by Masayoshi Son, founder and head of the telecom and Internet giant SoftBank Group. After the devastation at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant following the 2011 Tohoku earthquake, Son was so shocked by events that he established the Renewable Energy Institute soon aftewards to help develop and promote renewable energy.

“I was a total layman (in renewable energy) at the time of the earthquake,” Son told an audience attending in Tokyo last Friday. But perhaps his lack of technical knowledge is what allowed him to conceive of the Asia Super Grid. His idea was to tap the wind and solar energy power available in the Gobi Desert region of China, estimated to be equivalent to thousands of nuclear reactors. “People said it was crazy, too grand a scheme…politically impossible,” he added.

But soon, he had attracted interest from Korea Electric Power Company and the State Grid Corporation of China. Soon Russian power company PSJC Rosseti came on board as well. The next step in the process was the establishment of the nonprofit Global Energy Interconnection Development and Cooperation Organization in Beijing this past March. GEIDCO is led by Liu Zhenya, former chairman of State Grid. Members include the four Asia Super Grid signatories, as well as utilities, universities, and equipment manufacturers from 14 countries.

Now, I don’t know about you, but this was another jaw-dropper, again, because historically, there’s no love lost between Korea, China, and Japan, because of the Japanese occupation of the former, and invasion of China, and then, subsequently, the Chinese invasion of Korea. Getting these countries to agree on anything as sweeping as integrated power grids, even at just an “entrepreneurial” level, is huge. But in Asia, were commerce goes, politics usually follows, Japanese emperors, or Chinese or South Korean dictators notwithstanding. Notably the Japanese role in this occurs after the Fukushima-Daichi disaster, a disaster which can only have been looked at and studied closely in…

Continue Reading At: GizaDeathStar.com
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About Joseph P. Farrell

Joseph P. Farrell has a doctorate in patristics from the University of Oxford, and pursues research in physics, alternative history and science, and “strange stuff”. His book The Giza DeathStar, for which the Giza Community is named, was published in the spring of 2002, and was his first venture into “alternative history and science”.

Spain, USA To Share Space Monitoring Data

Source: GizaDeathStar.com
Dr. Joseph P. Farrell
March 2, 2016

This very intriguing article appeared last month, two days before the “Apollo 10 Moon Music” article which we blogged about yesterday. In other words, this article and the “Moon Music” article appeared within two days of each other, and it is little things like this that cause me to sit up and take notice, and to wonder if one is not perhaps looking at a pattern of deliberate, slow releases of information that, while appearing normal and mundane in their own right, when connected to other stories about the same egenral topic that appear in more or less the same sort of time, might indicate that “something is going on out there, and it has ‘them’ concerned.” Well, in that light, consider this article shared by Mr. T.M.:

US, Spain to Jointly Monitor Outer Space Traffic

There’s a couple of paragraphs here that picqued my high octane speculation faculty, and they are these:

Nine nations have previously signed separate agreements with STRATCOM: the United Kingdom, South Korea, France, Canada, Italy, Japan, Israel, Germany and Australia, the release noted.

In addition, two intergovernmental organizations, the European Space Agency and the European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites, as well as more than 50 commercial satellite providers, are already participating in data-sharing agreements with STRATCOM.

What’s notable here is that the list of nations involved in the space data sharing basically constitute a who’s who of the major economic powers of the West, so Spain’s addition to this list is not that surprising. Nor is it surprising that all of this is being coordinated by STRATCOM (U.S. Strategic Command), for after all, any strategic attack from the west, whether terrestrial in origin or not, is likely to come through space.

What intrigues me more here is the participation of commercial satellite providers. Again, in one sense, this is not surprising, since any attacks on the west are also likely to be coordinated with a blinding of satellite capability of any sort, military or otherwise.

Continue Reading At: GizaDeathStar.com