Infographic: Vaccine industry science lies are nothing more than recycled Big Tobacco science lies

Big Tobacco
Source: NaturalNews.com
Mike Adams
May 17, 2017

You gotta love it when arrogant science devotees defiantly claim they alone have a monopoly on the “settled facts” of our reality. Throughout much of the 20th century, it turns out, these same sort of arrogant scientists claimed smoking was awesome for your health, too.

“More doctors smoke Camels than any other cigarette” was the headline of a full-page ad carried by the Journal of the American Medical Association. Doctors were paid by Big Tobacco to tout the amazing health benefits of smoking cigarettes, and any doctor who dared point out that smoking might be linked to cancer was subjected to the same industry blackballing, scientific censorship and verbal abuse that’s leveled today against honest researchers questioning the safety of GMOs or mercury in vaccines.

The real truth is that science never has a monopoly on facts, and science makes enormous mistakes (such as condoning smoking cigarettes) on a regular basis. Science is also for sale and easy corrupted by corporate interests.

Peer-reviewed science journals, too, are often little more than a collection of corporate-funded make-believe science tabloids. “It is simply no longer possible to believe much of the clinical research that is published, or to rely on the judgment of trusted physicians or authoritative medical guidelines,” writes the former editor of The New England Journal of Medicine, Marcia Angell.

“I take no pleasure in this conclusion, which I reached slowly and reluctantly over my two decades as an editor of The New England Journal of Medicine,” she says in Drug Companies & Doctors: A Story of Corruption.

With that in mind, take a look at the similarities between Big Tobacco science lies and vaccine industry science lies:

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NO TREATMENT NEEDED: The US Population Could Cut Cancer Deaths In HALF Just By Adopting A Healthier Lifestyle

Cancer prevention
Source: NaturalNews.com
Amy Goodrich
June 7, 2016

Every year, cancer claims the lives of more than half a million Americans, making it the second leading cause of death in the United States. In 2015, a highly controversial paper was published that suggested that many cases of cancer are the result of random errors that cells make when they divide, or as they called it “bad luck.”

However, many studies have produced strong evidence that we need to stop thinking that cancer is down to bad luck or a result of factors beyond our control. A new study published in the journal JAMA Oncology found that new cases of cancer could drop by 20 to 40 percent, and cancer-related deaths could drop by half if we start adopting a healthier lifestyle.

Cancer deaths could be prevented

Researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health analyzed extensive ongoing studies where they assessed the healthy lifestyle patterns and cancer incidence of 136,000 white American healthcare professionals.

The participants were divided into two groups: a low-risk group, who lived a healthy lifestyle, and a high-risk group, who did not.

The healthy lifestyle factors included moderate or no drinking, a BMI between 18.5 and 27.5, weekly physical activity and not smoking. The authors of the study claim that people who never smoked or stopped smoking, stayed fit, managed their weight, and had no more than a drink or two a day, dramatically slashed the risk of dying from cancer by half.

While it was no surprise that lung cancer deaths could be reduced by up to 80 percent through living a healthy, smoke-free life, they also reported that more than a fifth of the cases of colon cancer, pancreatic cancer and kidney cancer could be prevented if we change the way we live.

After extrapolation of the data to the U.S. population at large, the researchers found that for women, an estimated 41 percent of cancer cases and 59 percent of cancer deaths were preventable. For men, 63 percent of cancer cases were preventable, and a 67 percent reduced risk of death was recorded.

Prevention saves lives

There were a few limitations to the study. All the participants included in the study were white; the high-risk group in the study was healthier than the general U.S. population; and dietary habits were not taken into account.

Nonetheless, these findings reinforce the strong link between lifestyle factors and cancer. Therefore, prevention, not the development of new treatments, should become the primary focus to control this dreadful disease that claims so many lives.

An accompanying editorial, co-authored by Harvard Chan School adjunct professor of epidemiology Graham A. Colditz, noted that most cancer is preventable.

“As a society, we need to avoid procrastination induced by thoughts that chance drives all cancer risk or that new medical discoveries are needed to make major gains against cancer, and instead we must embrace the opportunity to reduce our collective cancer toll by implementing effective prevention strategies and changing the way we live.”

Herewith, the authors refute the idea that the development of most cancers is a matter of random cell mutations and bad luck. Our actions matter. The authors call on people and policymakers to be more active in engaging in and encouraging healthy habits.

Read More At: NaturalNews.com

Selenium – What Is It & Where Do I Get It?

Selenium Benefits
Source: Mercola.com
Dr. Mercola
April 25, 2016

Selenium is an essential mineral found in varying concentrations in soil. It’s found in foods such as Brazil nuts, sunflower seeds and garlic, but the amount in any given food depends on the selenium content of the soil in which it was grown.

Selenium is also found in water and so also occurs in varying quantities in seafood, but despite its relatively common appearance in foods, many people are lacking this important mineral.

It’s estimated that 0.5 to 1 billion people worldwide suffer from selenium deficiency while even more consume less selenium than is necessary to provide protection against cancer and severe infectious diseases.1

A Little Bit of Selenium Goes a Long Way Toward Protecting Your Health

Your body has only a small requirement for selenium. The minimum daily recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for this mineral is 55 micrograms (mcg) for adults, and this is one nutrient where you don’t want too much.

While small amounts provide important benefits, taking too much (for instance, 400 mcg daily) has potentially been linked to an increased risk of diabetes.2 That being said, unless you’re taking a supplement, it’s difficult to “overdose” on selenium that’s naturally occurring in foods.

As mentioned, many people struggle to get enough. This is particularly true if you eat a primarily processed-food diet, as selenium is destroyed by refining and processing.3 Why is it so important to be sure your body has optimal selenium levels?

It acts as a powerful antioxidant (and its antioxidant effects increase when combined with vitamin E4).

Selenium’s Antioxidant Effects May Help Prevent Chronic Disease

Selenium, therefore, plays an important role in preventing chronic diseases and is also important for thyroid and immune system function. According to research published in the journal Microbial Ecology in Health and Disease:5

Selenium [Se] is critical to the health of living organisms. It has been postulated that the vast majority of the world’s population has suboptimal Se intakes, and hence is at increased risk of several diseases such as cancer, heart disease, viral diseases and other conditions that involve increased levels of oxidative stress.

There are several disease conditions (e.g. diabetes, several infectious diseases and possibly asthma) where … good Se status in combination with an adequate intake of other antioxidative nutrients may help cells and tissues better to cope with harmful oxidative stress caused.

For instance, by some toxic heavy metal or other environmental pollutants, by hyperglycaemia, or by the immune system’s reaction to infection. Efforts to increase Se concentration in the diet are urgent for both current and future generations.”

Low Selenium Levels May Increase Your Cancer Risk

Low selenium levels are linked with an increased risk of death from cancer and all causes.6

In 2015, research published in the International Journal of Cancer revealed that higher selenium levels are linked to a lower risk of colorectal cancer, particularly in women. The study also found that selenium status is suboptimal in many Europeans.7

In 2016, a meta-analysis of 69 studies also found that high selenium exposure (from food but not from supplements) had a protective effect on cancer risk and decreased the risk of the following types of cancer:8

  • Breast
  • Lung
  • Esophageal
  • Gastric
  • Prostate

Selenium has also been linked to a reduced risk of bladder cancer, although one of the most well-known studies regarding cancer and selenium was a 1996 study by the late Larry Clark, Ph.D., of the University of Arizona, which linked the mineral to an overall lower incidence of cancer risk of death.

In the study of 1,300 older people, the occurrence of cancer among those who took 200 micrograms of selenium daily for about seven years was reduced by 42 percent compared to those given a placebo.9 Cancer deaths for those taking the selenium were cut almost in half.

In addition, the men who took selenium had 63 percent fewer prostate cancers, 58 percent fewer colorectal cancers, 46 percent fewer lung cancers and overall 37 percent fewer cancers. Selenium was even found to reduce the risk of lung cancer to a greater degree than stopping smoking.

The cancer reductions were so significant that the blinded phase of the trial was stopped early, and no cases of selenium toxicity occurred. Some of the scientific explanations for selenium’s anti-cancer effects include:

  • Increased antioxidant protection and immune system support
  • Regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis (programmed cell death)
  • Triggering DNA repair in damaged cells
  • Suppression of growth of blood vessels supplying nutrients to the cancer
  • Inhibition of tumor cell invasion

Selenium for Immune System Support

It’s thought that selenium may exert its anti-cancer effects not only due to its antioxidant properties but also because of its ability to boost immune system function. Selenium may stimulate the immune system so it’s able to eliminate early cancers, for instance.

Further, a study in the North American Journal of Medical Sciences found the combination of selenium and beta-glucans (long-chain polysaccharides found in mushrooms) is particularly beneficial. The researchers concluded:10

Using two different murine models of cancer, we showed that the Se/glucan combination strongly suppressed the growth of cancer, mostly probably via stimulation of immunity.A combination of glucan with Se offers superior stimulation of immunity and inhibition of cancer growth.”

Aside from cancer, this immune stimulation may be beneficial for prevention of infectious diseases. Selenium is often mentioned in concert with HIV, as HIV-infected individuals often have low selenium levels.

Some studies have also found an association between selenium deficiency and progression to AIDS, while others have found selenium supplementation may reduce hospitalizations and improve white blood cell counts among this population.11

Selenium May Fight Viral and Bacterial Infections

It may also be useful for other viral infections, including influenza, as well as potentially bacterial infections. Researchers wrote in Advances in Nutrition:12

Viral and bacterial infections are often associated with deficiencies in macronutrients and micronutrients, including the essential trace element selenium. In selenium deficiency, benign strains of Coxsackie and influenza viruses can mutate to highly pathogenic strains.

Dietary supplementation to provide adequate or supranutritional selenium supply has been proposed to confer health benefits for patients suffering from some viral diseases, most notably with respect to HIV and influenza A virus (IAV) infections.

In addition, selenium-containing multimicronutrient supplements improved several clinical and lifestyle variables in patients coinfected with HIV and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Selenium status may affect the function of cells of both adaptive and innate immunity.”

One way selenium influences immune response is via selenoproteins (selenium-containing proteins). Individual selenoproteins are known to regulate inflammation and immunity, while it’s known that adequate levels of selenium are necessary to initiate immunity and also for regulating excessive immune responses and chronic inflammation.13

Continue Reading At: Mercola.com

Tobacco Companies Again Ordered to Disclose Harm from Cigarettes

smoking cigarettes out 735x350

Source: NaturalSociety.com
Christina Sarich
February 28, 2016

Big Tobacco companies like Phillip Morris STILL have to make public statements about smoking’s harmful effects. U.S. District Judge Gladys Kessler said so in an 11-page court decision.  She also slammed the industry’s fraudulent tactics to promote smoking and called the companies’ request to rewrite the public disclosures “ridiculous.”

The ruling stems from an anti-racketeering case that was brought against nine Big Tobacco companies 15 years ago. The conclusion was that the cigarette makers had engaged for over 50 years in a pervasive scheme to defraud customers and potential customers.  The companies had joined together to make more money by deceiving the public about smoking’s devastating health effects.

The companies were ordered to make corrective disclosures on their cigarette packaging, in their ads and on their websites. That’s why they SHOULD be putting out ads that look like this one:

But more often their ads subtly promote a positive image of cigarettes.

A study found that Philip Morris’s “Think. Don’t Smoke” ads resulted in more positive beliefs and attitudes towards cigarettes. Those beliefs increased even after the campaign was no longer aired. Youths who recalled the ads were also less likely to say that they would not smoke within the next year. This study confirmed earlier findings that the anti-smoking campaign actually caused favorable feelings about the tobacco industry.

The campaign’s purpose was not to discourage smoking, but to gain respectability and favor for it among the young.

Fortunately, Judge Kessler approved a draft requiring the cigarette makers to declare that they “intentionally designed cigarettes to make them more addictive” and to

“maximize the ingestion of nicotine, adding ammonia to make the cigarette taste less harsh, and controlling the physical and chemical make-up of the tobacco blend.”

Continue Reading At: NaturalSociety.com