Some Thoughts On J. Allen Hynek

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Source:RichardDolanPress.com
Richard Dolan
April 21, 2002

[Author’s Note: With a few modifications, this article is essentially excerpted from the second edition of UFOs and the National Security State, Volume 1. I am indebted to UFO researcher Val Germann for his assistance in preparing this article.]

Astronomer J. Allen Hynek is universally regarded as the most important scientist in the history of Ufology. He has even been called the “Galileo” of UFO research.

Yet, it is impossible to ignore Hynek’s complicity in publicly debunking UFOs for years. His own justification is well known: in order to retain access to official UFO reports, he could not afford to risk an open confrontation with the Air Force. Hynek made these claims as a matter of self defense, years after the fact in the 1970s, after he had been criticized by nearly everyone in the UFO field as an Air Force lackey. That this was Hynek’s reputation in the 1950s and 1960s seems all but forgotten today.

Jacques Vallee worked very closely with Hynek for years during the 1960s, and eventually concluded that “the Air Force kept Hynek around only as long as he was silent.” This is certainly true. The question is, why did Hynek keep silent? Was it because he was an unassertive type of person – that is, because of a feature of his personality? Nearly all UFO researchers who have written about Hynek say, in effect: yes, for all of his scientific virtues, he was not a fighter. An unfortunate but all too human weakness.

A detached analysis of the historical record does not justify this conclusion.

Generally speaking, Hyenk was a genial man who did not seek out open confrontations. This, in fact, was one of the important traits that made him valuable to national security interests. In the first place, Hynek was much more than a mere civilian scientist who “helped out” the Air Force. From 1942 to 1946, Hynek took a leave of absence from Ohio State University to work at the Johns Hopkins University, in Silver Springs, Maryland. While there, he was in charge of document security for the highly classified project sponsored by the Navy to develop a radio proximity fuse.

Along with radar and the atomic bomb, this is often considered as one of the three great scientific developments of the war. The device was a radio-operated fuse designed to screw into the nose of a shell and timed to explode at any desired distance from target.

  1. Allen Hynek. A central, and problematic, figure in the history of UFO research.

Many scientists, of course, performed work for the defense establishment during World War Two. But Hynek’s project was of considerable importance, and it does not appear that his main contribution was scientific: after all, he was an astrophysicist. Rather, one of his main efforts was in a security related area.

Vallee kept a diary during the period that he worked with Hynek. It remained unpublished until 1992 as Forbidden Science, long after Hynek was dead and enshrined as the “father of scientific ufology.” When read with care, Vallee’s observations make it clear that there was much more to J. Allen Hynek than initially met the eye. And yet, the UFO research community has continued to ignore the implications, and even the plain facts, that Vallee related.

The proximity fuse was six times more effective than the timed fuses it replaced. Hynek was in charge of document security for the development of this important weapon

For example, rumors had abounded through the 1960s that Blue Book was a public relations facade, and that there was a “secret study” of UFOs going on. Vallee, too, had his suspicions, and broached this subject with Hynek every so often. Hynek inevitably rejected such opinions without reservation. Blue Book, Hynek maintained, was the real thing, albeit a project that was being done incompetently.

Vallee was never quite convinced. He noticed Hynek’s cagey attitude about UFOs, that he seemed to know much more than he usually let on about the subject, that he often appeared to be more interested in self promotion than actual study of the problem, and that his personal records were in a state of near disaster.

Then Vallee found the infamous “Pentacle Memorandum” in Hynek’s office. This was a highly classified document from January 1953, proving the existence of a separate study group of UFOs, and which urged that the Robertson Panel be delayed until they had come to their own conclusions. Very strong stuff. In the mid 1960s, there was still no inkling among the wider public that there was any such study as this.

On another occasion, a colleague of Vallee and Hynek showed Vallee “some very interesting photographs taken from an airplane.” Here is the relevant passage:

“Do you know who took these? Allen did! But he hasn’t recorded the place, the date or the time …” It turns out Allen was aboard an airliner when he suddenly noticed a white object at his altitude, seemingly flying at the same speed as the plane. He made sure it wasn’t a reflection and he convinced himself it must be some faraway cloud with an unusual shape. He pulled out his camera ‘to see how fast he could snap pictures.’ In all he took two pairs of stereoscopic photographs and gave it no more thought.

The photographs themselves appeared in a book authored by Hynek and Vallee in 1975, The Edge of Reality. They may or may not be of a flying saucer, but they are certainly not clouds. The importance of stereoscopic photographs cannot be overemphasized. Such a camera is of outstanding evidentiary value. Hynek, in effect, had captured a possible Holy Grail on film. But what happened?

Vallee continues:

Fred only learned about this a few weeks later. But then Hynek had lost the negatives and one shot from every pair was missing. … Naturally the loss of the negatives makes it impossible to determine whether it was really a cloud or not. Fred is indignant: “Sometimes I have the feeling Allen doesn’t want to know,” he says.

Hynek, who had headed document security for the proximity fuse project, “lost” one (and only one) negative from such a set as this. One might well wonder, to whom did he actually pass this material?

One of the two photographs Hynek took from a plane with a stereoscopic camera. He nevertheless lost one (and only one) negative from each image.

During another conversation, Hynek mentioned to Vallee that the Air Force had sent him a new contract draft. He did not know whether or not he should sign it, and gave it to Vallee to read.

Vallee wrote:

The contract, I was surprised to read, was not really with the Air Force but with the Dodge Corporation, a subsidiary of McGraw Hill. “What’s McGraw Hill doing in the middle of all this?” I asked without trying to hide my bafflement. “Is that some sort of cut out?” “Oh, they are just contractors to the Foreign Technology Division,” Hynek replied. “By working through companies like McGraw Hill, which is a textbook publisher, it’s easier for them to hire professors and scholars to conduct some Intelligence activities, keeping up with Soviet technology, for example. Many academics would be nervous saying they were working for the Foreign Technology Division.” The contract clearly puts Hynek under the administrative supervision of a man named Sweeney, who is not a scientist. And it clearly specifies Hynek’s task as evaluating the sightings of unknown objects to determine if they represent a danger for the security of the United States.

Hynek’s substantial Air Force money was passed to him through a third party. Thus, Hynek’s relationship with “security” continued right through the 1960s. We also learn from Vallee that Hynek, despite his monthly trips to Wright-Patterson AFB, almost never saw Blue Book Chief Hector Quintanilla, but was received personally by the commander, who usually took him to lunch at the officer’s club. When Vallee asked Hynek what they talked about, Hynek replied, “innocently,” the weather and foreign cuisine.

The preceding passage raises other unanswered questions, such as how many other academics were receiving cut out money to hide their intelligence value? Hynek’s remarks implied that he knew quite a lot about this topic, but unfortunately, the conversation appeared to stop dead at that point. One might also wonder, who was Sweeney? And, since Hynek was being funded through one cut out organization, why not two (not at all an unusual intelligence practice)? That is, was the Air Force itself a cut out for another organization? This is currently an unanswerable question, but well worth asking in light of the clear evidence that the CIA was a major perhaps the major player behind the scenes in the UFO mystery.

Another interesting and generally ignored fact about Hynek was the close relationship he had with C. The astronomical community has always been small, and of course it is not surprising that, aside from the issue of UFOs, the two men would know each other well. But this relationship was more than a simple professional acquaintance.

From 1955 to 1960, for instance, Hynek was associate director of the Smithsonian Institution’s Astrophysics Observatory in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and headed its optical satellite tracking program. During this period he also lectured at Harvard University. Menzel, meanwhile, had been a full professor at Harvard since 1938 and was the most prestigious astrophysicist in North America. For all intents and purposes, Menzel was Harvard’s Astronomy Department. While Hynek was in town, Menzel was full director of the Harvard Observatory, and (as Vallee noted in passing) was Hynek’s mentor. On one occasion, Hynek declined to write a Forward for Menzel’s book. One assumes, then, that Menzel asked in the first place.

Donald Menzel was an arch-UFO debunker, senior member of the U.S. intelligence community, and an alleged MJ-12 member. He was also a mentor of J. Allen Hynek.

When considering the public opposition the two occasionally had (such as their participation in a scientific debate on UFOs in late 1952), this closeness seems out of place. But the public view is often the misleading view.

Menzel, of course, was not merely one of the world’s leading astronomers. He was a man tightly connected to the upper levels of the American national security community, and personally close to Vannevar Bush. During the war, Menzel chaired the Radio Propagation Committee of the Joint and Combined Chiefs of Staff and the Section of Mathematical and Physical Research of U.S. Naval Communications. He was a top level cryptologist who had a longstanding association with the National Security Agency, possessed a Navy Top Secret Ultra security clearance, consulted for 30 companies on classified projects, and worked for the CIA. Through the entire 1950s, Menzel was still a serving intelligence officer.

Revelations such as these about are especially important when one considers how sanitized Hynek’s treatment continues to be at the hands of most writers in the UFO field. Indeed, even Menzel is sanitized. Jerome Clark, for instance, claimed that Menzel’s secret government work “does not significantly differentiate him from many other elite scientists of his generation.” There is some truth in this statement, but the larger picture is missed. What matters is that the surface and undercurrent move in different directions.

In the 1950s, as today, UFOs were a topic of great secrecy. They were important. In this context, the classified lives of men like Hynek and Menzel matter a very great deal. These were men strongly connected with the topic of UFOs, who by their outward appearance were at antipodes. Yet, below the surface, many commonalities existed.

Hynek’s defenders have remained at the surface, claiming that his position on UFOs evolved over the years from skeptic to believer. Such a simple transition is unlikely. For years, Hynek had access to classified Air Force UFO reports. Many of those reports were unusual and unconventional – as Hynek himself stated years after the fact – and the Air Force official explanations for many of these were clearly absurd. Yet, for year after year, he did nothing. Even followers in good faith might ask: what took him so long?

Hynek’s remarks and insights, provided years after the fact, remain of value to the UFO researcher. But the careful reader must remain mindful of Hynek’s history in this subject. It is a history that, depending upon which character flaw was his correct one, leads any serious researcher into a stance of wariness regarding J. Allen Hynek.

Read More At: RichardDolanPress.com

Everywhere, By Stealth

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Source: RichardDolanPress.com
Richard Dolan
November 8, 2011

Every day, spectacular events occur in the skies, in space, in the oceans, and on the ground. Astonished witnesses around the world see them. For many, the shock of something so extraordinary, so inexplicable, is a consciousness-shattering experience, never forgotten. Yet few of them tell anyone at all of what they saw, save perhaps a close friend or family member.

The things they see are of some variety, but which often fall within one of several categories. Here is a report that is typical. It describes an event that occurred in Hydes, Maryland, on May 15, 1976, but wasn’t reported until twenty-three years later to the National UFO Reporting Center, on the World Wide Web. The witness who wrote about this was with five other people, all adults and professionals, lying on the front lawn of a farm after dinner at about 7 p.m. To their great surprise, they saw an enormous, round craft approach slowly from the horizon, perhaps at 30 or 40 miles per hour. It slowly rotated in counter-clockwise direction; white lights were visible on the outer edges. The witness estimated the object’s diameter to be 1,000 feet, although it was hard to notice details, due to the sunlight at the time of day. When the object appeared over them, it stopped and split into four smaller, wedged shaped craft. Then, in the “blink of an eye,” the objects zoomed away to the North, South, East, and West. There was never a sound during the sighting. “To this day,” writes the witness, “we have never spoken about this to anyone, not even ourselves.”

This sighting is extraordinary, inexplicable, and utterly commonplace. The records of UFO reports describe many examples of craft that are silent, divide into smaller segments, and zip away noiselessly at amazing speeds. Not only do ordinary people report them, but so do military personnel. As with the military, so it is with civilians that silence is usually the rule when it comes to UFOs. The reasons differ, of course, just as trauma and fear of ridicule differ from secrecy protocols.

However one wishes to interpret the phenomenon, every indication points to the number of UFO witnesses being not in the thousands, but the millions. Whether one considers the subject to be bunk, or of the utmost seriousness, people are seeing things which are affecting them deeply. Because there are no institutional structures for them to report, or even talk about, what they saw, they keep silent and try to forget what is unquestionably the most incredible experience of their lives. For some, time takes its eventual toll on the strength of their convictions, and they convince themselves that maybe what they saw wasn’t all that incredible. They keep silent, of course, because they fear being labeled as crazy — a luxury few can afford.

Seeing is not always believing, much less understanding. What matters is seeing with the right perspective. History provides many examples of people seeing things that were denied by higher authorities; even more of people who saw old things in new ways, and were ignored. Galileo failed to get the Pope even to look at Jupiter’s moons through a telescope. In the 18th century, the French Academy of Science denied that stones could fall from the heavens, and rejected the mass of witnesses testimony as superstitious nonsense. For most of the 20th century, scientists dismissed continental drift as fantasy, despite the observations that Africa and South America seemed to fit together, and shared many geological properties.

Leaving science for politics, the examples become more dramatic, almost surreal. The last century has provided several instances of entire peoples being liquidated amid blanket denials from their killers. Each time, witnesses came forth to announce what was happening, only to face silence or dismissal. Meanwhile, entire nations, such as the Armenians, Ukrainians, Kazakhs, Jews, Slavs, Cambodians, and East Timorese — to name merely the best known — were ravaged.

The mass of ignored UFO sightings fits into this pattern, whatever its ultimate answer may be. You may see; you may know. Whether you can persuade in the face of official denials is entirely different.

This pattern evolved over the last century. The airship wave of 1897, for instance, mirrored our own age by commanding broad public interest, then vanishing into the collective memory hole. Early witnesses, however, responded to these sightings rather differently than today. Official ridicule was less important, talk of aliens was non-existent (except for a few isolated jokes about men from Mars), and people were more forthcoming to their local, independent, newspapers to describe what they saw. Mainly, there were fewer genuine UFO sightings, and people were less aware of the phenomenon. It was just as well; people had nowhere to report what they saw. In 1897, if you thought you saw an alien, you were on your own.

This changed after the Second World War, when sightings of anomalous events spiked dramatically upward. A crucial reason was that new technologies, such as radar, made it easier to detect UFOs, as did widespread aviation. Therefore, it is impossible to state conclusively that UFOs themselves became more common, despite this being the working assumption of most UFO writers. It is, however, a reasonable supposition, based upon the upsurge in reports by witnesses on the ground. If this is so, we cannot yet know why; we can only guess.

One point is beyond question: UFOs became important to our military and political elites. This required the collection of as much intelligence as fast as possible, and gives full flavor to the intense media coverage of flying saucers following Kenneth Arnold’s sighting of June 24, 1947. For months and years before Arnold’s encounter, Americans and Europeans, including military personnel, had been seeing UFOs. Early in 1947, for example, military aircraft had “chased” a UFO over the North Sea, only to be outmaneuvered and outraced. The intense media barrage following Arnold’s sighting lasted for two weeks, encouraged people from around the country to report what they saw, then stopped abruptly. Then, for the next two decades, military agencies such as Projects Sign, Grudge, and Blue Book continued to accept reports from the public — without lending any credence to them — which provided a useful service for the collection of intelligence.

From the late 1940s to the late 1960s, an American who saw a UFO could rest easy with the fiction that his government would investigate the event. Blue Book, however, was a mere collection point: it could not conduct any true analysis of UFOs and was only charged with debunking the matter to the public. This deficiency was apparent by the early 1950s; in response, two formidable private groups were able to compete with Blue Book for the collection of UFO reports: The National Investigative Committee on Aerial Phenomena (NICAP) and the Aerial Phenomena Research Organization (APRO). This institutional structure helped to give UFO witnesses a veneer of legitimacy.

Even so, most sightings went unreported. During Blue Book’s heyday, Air Force consultant Allen Hynek conservatively estimated that the program received less than ten percent of all actual UFO sightings. Accepting this logic translates into over 120,000 sightings of UFOs in the United States for roughly two decades, and a much larger number of witnesses. In light of Blue Book’s fallacious method of explaining most of these sightings, we are left with the unsettling conclusion that there were thousands upon thousands of legitimate UFO sightings during that period.

The era of institutional legitimacy was brief. By the mid-1960s, a new wave of UFO sightings created a sense of near-crisis. The role of Blue Book became a bit obvious when the best it could do, in effect, was to blame UFOs on swamp gas. The loss of public credibility outweighed any counter value Blue Book might have possessed as a collection agency of UFO reports. Its demise became inevitable from that point; by 1969 it was dead. Ironically, in closing its doors, Blue Book also vanquished its two main competitors, NICAP and APRO, neither of which ever recovered from the ‘bear market’ for UFOs that ensued in the aftermath.

Which brings us to our present era. An awesome number of UFO sightings continue to occur, but which now leave no echo within the public realm. Officially, the military no longer admits to investigating UFOs. Although several organizations accept UFO reports, few witnesses know of them. The largest UFO organization of the past thirty years, the Mutual UFO Network (MUFON), does not compare in size or quality to NICAP or APRO. The result is something like the situation prior to the 1940s, with nowhere for a witness to go, and nothing that officialdom will “do” about it. It is the situation of our six friends sitting on the lawn of their farm, watching in silent, isolated, awe as an object of unimaginable technology flew over their heads. Once again, we are on our own.

Such is the very rough, public development of the human response to the problem. Regarding the UFOs themselves, there have been a few consistent threads spanning the years. They operate by stealth. They are silent. They are everywhere. They have not publicly identified themselves. They represent technology that is impossible by known standards. For decades, people have claimed to see aliens, to have been abducted by them, and occasionally to have communicated with them.

Ensnared by the unknown between the poles of official silence and ridicule, people offer their own theories. The aliens are here to create a race of hybrids for future colonization of the planet. Or, they are tourists here to visit. Or, they are scientists studying us, bound by the prime directive of non-interference. Or, they are here for the Earth’s minerals and DNA. Or, they are space brothers seeking to enlighten those humans ready to receive their wisdom. Or, they are indifferent to our fate. Or, they are from our future. Or, they are demonic entities as portrayed in the New Testament. Or, they are angelic beings who can be channeled. Or, they are hyper-dimensional entities who can blip into and out of our reality. Or, they have been here all along and have guided human evolution.

There is no sure way out of this morass. Even official “disclosure” of UFOs — a laudable goal with fifty years of history — cannot reliably lead to a state of clarity. It is not certain from which source disclosure can come: does the President really know everything? Nor is there a way to verify the extent or accuracy of disclosure. Past official statements do not give cause for confidence. Indeed, the CIA has been claiming for several years that it has provided disclosure, after admitting to an interest in UFO reports to protect the existence of its classified aircraft. Further disclosures from official sources may provide information that fits along any point in the long spectra of completeness, accuracy, honesty, and intentions. In other words, we might in theory receive information that is complete, accurate, honest, and with the public’s best intentions in mind. Or, it may be incomplete, incorrect, dishonest, and with the intention to sell us down the river. Or anywhere in between.

We must also consider the likelihood that full and accurate disclosure may not be possible. Our leaders may know a little bit about this, or they may know much. There is no reason, however, to believe that they know everything of importance, or that they have a relationship with aliens on some level of parity. If others have arrived with technology far beyond our own, it is more likely that our leaders have not achieved “diplomatic” parity, or would learn anything more than what these others want them to know. This could be nearly anything. Self-serving dispensing of isolated facts comprises a large part of U. S. diplomatic history, and indeed the history of most nations; there is no apparent reason why it must be different with an advanced race.

Conceding the above, it remains that the fight to end UFO secrecy remains one of the great causes of our day. It is a struggle for truth, self-government, and survival. It is a call for courage in the face of a potentially grave threat. It is fighting the good fight, regardless of the consequences.

“Fight” may well be the most apt of all words. Based upon our limited knowledge about the underside of this phenomenon, humanity appears to be facing the presence of others under the worst possible circumstances. The maxim “divide and conquer” is well-worn in our own history. An observation of the human response to the presence of others suggests it is one they know as well.

 Read More At: RichardDolanPress.com

March Book Haul 2017

MarchBookHaul.jpg

TheBreakaway | BreakawayConciousness
Zy Marquiez
April 6, 2017

This month there were some serendipitous finds within the realm of books and reading that help feed the addict’s voracious hunger.  The topics are wide in scope as they are intriguing, and have made for some thought-provoking reading when I’ve had the time.

#1: The Nuclear Axis: Secret Collaboration Between West Germany & South Africa by Zdenek Cervenka & Barbara Rogers

The title says it all. This book details the connection between West Germany and South Africa, which is actually more disturbing than at first blush.  The book also delineates which other countries were involved in this fiasco besides South Africa, and shows that Germany, who went on record never to create nuclear weapons post World War 2, became in fact a de-facto nuclear power.  Then again, it shouldn’t be shocking considering that Germany’s attempted world domination in three previous instances.

#2:  Striking Thoughts: Bruce Lee’s Wisdom For Daily Living by Bruce Lee

Knowing that Bruce Lee is the epitome of Individuality, reading about him has been something that I’ve wanted to do for quite some time.

This book has been an inspiring read.  Due to its format, the book can be read straight through, or just broken up into small pieces given that it’s not a book which builds on itself like most non-fiction books.  For me the latter method has worked better.

Usually just slice off a few pages on a daily basis as the aphorisms give one much to ponder about in unexpected ways.  Granted, some of the aphorisms are fairly straight forward, but there’s plenty of insights to be had if one remains open minded.

#3Culture As History: The Transformation Of American Society In The Twentieth Century by Historian Warren Susman

Wishing to learn more about the change culture American culture has gone through, this book felt like a natural pick considering it was mentioned in Susan Cain’s Quiet – The Power Of Introverts In A World That Can’t Stop Talking.  In Quiet, Cain mentions how in her book Culture As History historian Susman covers the transition between the culture of character to a culture of personality.  Seeing the results of this change in modern times, thought it prudent to go back in time and see where society began changing.  Predictably, there was serious social engineering and propaganda taking place to bring this about.   I am definitely looking forward to research this topic further down the line.

#4:  The War Of Art: Break Through The Blocks & Win Your Inner Creative Battles  Steven Pressfield

This book barely became known to me a few weeks ago.  Being the book-addict that I am, initially, I told myself not to purchase this or any other book for that matter until catching up on some reading, but after about a week of pondering, I just couldn’t resist.  This merits a shout out to all bodacious bloggers that feed that addiction!  [If you got time and want to check out another fellow wordpress blogger on all things writing, click this link to check out Calliope Writing]

This book is like the Art Of War but doused with much inspiration and creativity.  If there’s even one cell of creativity within you, ruminate upon getting this book.

#5:  Speed: Facing Our Addiction To Fast & Faster – And Overcoming Our Fear Of Slowing Down by Dr. Stephanie Brown Ph.D.

This book covers society’s addiction to living at the vanguard at Warp 9.  This book brings about quite a few different concerns, especially considering that a sizeable portion of society follows the actions noted in this book to a tee, particularly the younger generations.  If you have young ones or know of anybody that might be plugged in to the matrix 24/7 so to speak, considering having them get this book.  There’s a review of it here.

#6:  UFOs for the 21st Century Mind by Richard Dolan

If you’ve ever wondered about where to start regarding the abstruse subjects of UFOs, START HERE.  Even if you have, this book still offers a lot of value given the severity of the subject.  Having read dozens of books on this subject, many books usually end up leaving the reader wanting more.  Additionally, there really isn’t anything as comprehensive and detailed as this.  The book is sourced to the hilt, is written in an easy to follow manner and considers a serious topic in a sobering and yet thought provoking way.  There’s a review that was written on this here.

#7J.R.R. Tolkien’s: A Biography by Humphrey Carpenter

Having binged on many Tolkien books in February, and having heard from John Taylor Gatto that reading many biographies allows individuals the foresight to see things they might have not seen, thought getting this book would be a prudent choice.  Haven’t delved into it, but hopefully am able to within the next month or so.

#8:  The Autobiography Of Benjamin Franklin by Benjamin Franklin

Along the same lines as the above, this book was purchased in order to brush up a bit on one of the Founding Fathers through the autobiographical lens.  It’s definitely fascinating getting an inner look at one of the people responsible for helping create America.  It helps put things into perspective in a way that history books lack.   Review will come up soon.

#9:  The Elements Of Style [4th Edition] by William Strunk Jr. & E.B. White

This book was purchased with the intention to grow and learn as a writer.  Being an autodidact and seeking to teach myself more on this lengthy subject, this seemed like a prudent place to start.  BOY WAS IT WORTH IT.  The book, although small in size, offers much knowledge to glean from it.  If you’re a writer, you need to get this book for the tenets within it will undoubtedly help you grow.  That said, there is a newer version of this book available.  Found this out about a week after purchasing the first one, go figure!  Given that it isn’t in my hands yet, I can’t vouch for it, YET, but once it gets here it will be read and reviewed in due time.

Why read a book similar to one just read?  Great question.  Because the 4th Edition of Elements of Style offered so much, I thought that if the new book followed through and offer even more information than the previous book, why not give it a gander?  Might end up gifting the other one out to a friend, but either way, the investment will be well placed.

#10:  The Book Of Virtues: A Treasure Of Great Moral Stories by William J. Bennett

A veritable treasure trove of insights on virtue from countless angles, this book homes in on many of the core tents that used to get taught in society but don’t get taught as much nowadays.  It seems like a great place to seek historical sources that showcase virtues within literature.

#11:  Sekret Machines: Gods: Volume 1 Of Gods Man & War by Tom DeLonge & Peter Levenda

I reviewed this book a few weeks ago and predictably, it is being censored by Amazon, as per usual.  If you want to read how to verify the censorship, read the next bracketed paragraph, and if not, just skip it for the synopsis.

[This can be verified simply.  Click on the link above, scroll down to the reviews, and then take a look at the two pictures to the right of customers who took pictures of the book.  The picture on the right under the name ZyPhReX, was the review done by me.  As you can see from the picture, I gave the book 3 stars.  Now, when you go back into the original book link, and click to check on all reviews that gave the book 3 stars, my review will NOT be showing whatsoever.  My contention is that not only is my review critical of this book in sobering fashion, but it also outlines alternative books to this topic, and that’s something the consortium hates to hear.  Regardless of the reason, the Book Review being censored is ludicrous since it follows all guidelines by Amazon, and the review is even shown under the picture.  And no, this isn’t the first time and its happened and doubt it will be the last.]

My original thoughts were that since Peter Levenda is a top-notch researcher, of whom many books I own, and seeing as DeLonge seems to have a genuine curiosity on the subject, the book might be a good read.  Boy was I wrong!

Although the book does feature intriguing information, the authors paint a picture that’s quite bleak of humanity, even using the parlance of “Cargo Cult” for humans and even go on to write about humanity as if wholly incapable, even there’s plethora of evidence showing otherwise.

Moreover, the authors take a very narrow point of views in explaining UFOs, which is quite detrimental.  Not that beings from another place visiting the Earth is out of the question, far from it, but to use a one dimensional approach to explain a multi-dimensional issue served to make this book a catastrophe.

As I noted in the review of this book:

“… one particular point that was quite disconcerting is the fact that the authors take a unilateral point of view of making it seem like UFOs can only be explained by the alien mythos.  While this is certainly one possibility, and one with some solid grounding, it is not the only one, and not by far.  Dr. Joseph P. Farrell, Walter Bosley, and others have come up with an equally arguable case that argues for human ingenuity as one possible way to explain some UFOs.”

Lastly, a rather unexpected find was being able to get almost 20 National Geographic magazines, each for 10 cents at the library.  I am sharing this in hopes for people to realize that sometimes at local libraries there are incredible deals if you happen to venture there at the right time.

That said, did any of you purchase any intriguing books recently?  If so, what were they?  I am always genuinely curious as to what other individuals read and find intriguing. A significant portion of what I choose to read is because of what other people have made known to me, either directly or indirectly, and  this is my attempt to pay it forward.

Hope you are all well and have a great week.

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This article is free and open source. You are encouraged and have permission to republish this article under a Creative Commons license with attribution to Zy Marquiez and TheBreakaway.wordpress.com.
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About The Author:

Zy Marquiez is an avid book reviewer, researcher, an open-minded skeptic, yogi, humanitarian, and freelance writer who studies and mirrors regularly subjects like Consciousness, Education, Creativity, The Individual, Ancient History & Ancient Civilizations, Forbidden Archaeology, Big Pharma, Alternative Health, Space, Geoengineering, Social Engineering, Propaganda, and much more.

His own personal blog is BreakawayConsciousnessBlog.wordpress.com where his personal work is shared, while TheBreakaway.wordpress.com serves as a media portal which mirrors vital information usually ignored by mainstream press, but still highly crucial to our individual understanding of various facets of the world.

Book Review: UFOs For The 21st Century Mind by Richard Dolan

UFOs21CM
TheBreakaway | BreakawayConciousness
Zy Marquiez
April 4, 2017

In UFOs & The National Security State: Chronology Of A Cover-up – Volume 1, Richard Dolan carried out his opening salvo into the field of UFOlogy.  Seeking a veritable encyclopedia  of verifiable UFO sightings and never finding one, Dolan wrote a book based upon all data he collated from all the previous research he had undertaken.  In essence, he wrote the book he was looking for in UFOlogy, but wasn’t available.

In UFO’s & The National Security State – Volume 2, Dolan further cemented himself as a genuine historian by buttressing his previous work with another landmark piece.  Like his other books, this book is sourced to the hilt, which is appreciated for those seeking to venture further into the abstruse.  Moreover, this book is also the book in which the term “Breakaway Civilization” was coined.  A notable point to be sure, because that idea has been used by others seeking truth within this field and others, and it’s helped shed light into darker areas in this field.  What’s more, the ‘encyclopedia’ that Dolan began in volume one continued.

Thence, in A.D. After Disclosure, Dolan and his author Bryce Zabel sought to examine how the day after “the Others” are announced might play out, and they carry out the examination in salient fashion.  This book features a very sober analysis to many of the probable scenarios that will play out in a post-disclosure worked.  Anyone seeking to understand the possibilities such a sobering day will bring should ruminate upon getting this book.

Now, in UFOs For The 21st Century Mind, Dolan wrote a book to grapple the mind of newer generations and readers, the unexposed minds, the interested minds that have long sought to dive into “the phenomenon” but didn’t know where to start.

Along this stream of thought, this book strikingly brings about a fresh new look at UFOs, with modern eyes, employing a much broader perspective and dataset than the average UFO book.  Dolan doesn’t simply stick to classic sightings, abductions and declassified documents, but goes beyond to ruminate upon the realm of consciousness, quantum entanglement and more.  This book really is an up-to-date assessment of the situation from a multiplicity of angles.

Dolan begins the book by examining what UFOs could be by guiding the reader closer to the subject thoughtful and yet trenchant manner.  This helps the reader familiarize themselves with the subject and come to realize that there are a variety of explanations for UFO phenomena, many of which do not get considered   at length, if at all.  Additionally, this is also crucial because many individuals still continue to experience the phenomena in a variety of ways, and yet there aren’t any official channels to seek help from.

In Dolan’s own words:

“Whether or not you consider UFOs to be nonsense or of great importance, people are seeing things that are affecting them deeply.  Because there are no institutional structures for them to report or discuss what they see, they often keep silent, and try to forget or only secretly cherish one of the most incredible experiences of their lives.”[1]

Dolan, however, doesn’t shy away from the fact that this is a very serious issue.  While ruminating deeply upon it, he ponders reasons both pro and con that will help bring lucidity to a situation often bathed in shadows.  In fact, implications in the fields of economy, politics, religion, culture and science are given a cursory overview early on, and then are covered at length later in the book.  Dolan doesn’t merely stop there, though.

Journeying back in time, Dolan goes on to explore this phenomenon all the way back into ancient times and attempts to separate the wheat from the chaff.  This is important because it shows UFOs aren’t merely a modern phenomena.   In addition, salient subjects such as pyramids, lost civilizations, and ancient images goes to show that there probably is more than meets the eye within this field.

Interestingly, we know that some pyramids contain astronomical data.  This is particularly interesting because when this information is taken in conjunction with much of the lore and myths that abound those structures, and the fact that there’s hundreds of pyramids around the globe, and the fact that many of the core of the myths echoes nigh carbon copy traditions,  it should bring one pause.  Granted, it’s not proof, but very suggestive evidence nonetheless.

What’s more, some ancient writings seem to have what could be descriptions of ancient technology, such as the passage from Ezekiel, from the Bible, which Josef Blumrich, former NASA employee, sought to debunk.

Ironically, in the book The Spaceships of Ezekiel:

“Blumrich presented technical specifications of the spacecraft that he argued, fit Ezekiel’s description perfectly.  Of course, we should remember that Ezekiel presumably was describing something well beyond his experience for his time 2,500 years ago.  If he did see a descending spacecraft, he would have lacked the language or technological understanding to describe it in any way other than he did.”[2]

Later in the book, Dolan brings the reader up to more modern times when he examines a distinct array of sightings  and issues from the time.  These include ghost rockets, the Airship mysteries, which are rather fascinating in fact, the Minot case, the Malmstrom case, airspace violations and more.  Subsequent to that that, Dolan grapples with the issue of pervasive secrecy which he ruminates upon at length, and all that that entailed.  Many of the classics – Kecksburg, Aztec, Roswell – are also given a cursory glance.

But it doesn’t stop there.  Other significant incidents of “High Strangeness” get examined, such as some famous sightings around the globe, encounters with these beings, abductions [i.e. Travis Walton & Betty & Barney Hill] and even some crash retrievals.  All of this coalesces to allow the reader to note that there’s more than ample evidence to show that the phenomena not only existed for many decades, but was taken extremely seriously by those in the upper echelons of society.

Dolan also makes sure to hone in on quite of few aspects of the early period within UFOlogy’s history.  Here he covers everything from the blatant cover that took place behind the scenes, FOIA requests, the penetration of UFO groups by intelligence agencies and even touches upon the need for more people to get involved in a more serious manner.

This call to arms isn’t to be taken lightly because, as Dolan intimates:

“…a proper study of UFOs is a revolutionary experience.  It shatters old belief systems and forces us to look at our world in a completely new way.  Everything is affected: history, politics, economics, science, religion, culture, and our ultimate vision of who and what we are as human beings.”[3]

This subject seeps into all aspects of life, which is why it should be taken seriously.  When all collated information Dolan has amassed is pondered at length and given a fair shot, it is impossible not see something is going on.  Deeper truths lie locked-up within the rabbit holes of the field.  Undoubtedly, whenever some of these truths arise they will change the face of the world over night.  Those that are researching this field will be ahead of the pack in understanding the phenomenon and much of the disinformation that will also come regarding it, in the future.  That is another point to consider why this book should be read.

This subject is too important to overlook, and if humanity is ever going to prepare itself to live in a post-disclosure era, it is important to know the history of this subject and its implications.  If you’ve never read a book on this subject in your life, make this your first one.  You will not regret it.  As someone whose read over three dozen books on the subject, nothing else comes close to be this comprehensive while also being sober and realistic. Simply stated, if you want a book that is accessible to lay person, but also stimulating enough to get your brain cells churning, get this book.

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Footnotes:

[1] Richard Dolan, UFOs For The 21st Century Mind, p. 9
[2] Ibid., p. 55.
[3] Ibid., p. 2.

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This article is free and open source. You are encouraged and have permission to republish this article under a Creative Commons license with attribution to Zy Marquiez and TheBreakaway.wordpress.com.
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About The Author:

Zy Marquiez is an avid book reviewer, researcher, an open-minded skeptic, yogi, humanitarian, and freelance writer who studies and mirrors regularly subjects like Consciousness, Education, Creativity, The Individual, Ancient History & Ancient Civilizations, Forbidden Archaeology, Big Pharma, Alternative Health, Space, Geoengineering, Social Engineering, Propaganda, and much more.

His own personal blog is BreakawayConsciousnessBlog.wordpress.com where his personal work is shared, while TheBreakaway.wordpress.com serves as a media portal which mirrors vital information usually ignored by mainstream press, but still highly crucial to our individual understanding of various facets of the world.

The Lost Opportunity: 1966 In Retrospect

EarthSource: RichardDolanPress.com
Richard Dolan
March 23, 2017

copyright ©2001 by Richard M. Dolan. All rights reserved.

There are quite a few UFO researchers and lobbyists who believe they are thisclose to ending UFO secrecy sometime soon. As far as I can tell, they are good people, and I wish them success. It may be that within the next few years I may lend a voice to help.

Right now, however, all I can see is how past efforts have failed.

The struggle to end UFO secrecy has produced several still-borns. In 1947, a report of a crashed disc at Roswell survived for three hours before being snuffed out by the Air Force. During 1952, that amazing year of UFOs, a small faction of military insiders tried to end secrecy. They, too, were thwarted.

Each time, however, the struggle became more intense. By the late 1950s, a private organization entered the fray, dedicated to ending UFO secrecy. This was the National Investigative Committee on Aerial Phenomena (NICAP). With three admirals on its executive board, and led by retired Marine Corps Major, Donald E. Keyhoe, the organization gained the ear of several leading members of Congress. For several years, it appeared that NICAP was on the verge of gaining open Congressional hearings on UFOs, each time to experience disappointment at the eleventh hour. In late 1961, it looked like NICAP might go all the way. Its most prominent member was Admiral Roscoe Hillenkoetter, formerly the director of the CIA. Hilly believed in UFOs and had agreed to appear before Congress in the spring of 1962 to talk about the secrecy. Everything was set until February, when Hillenkoetter, clearly under pressure from someone, resigned from NICAP and bailed out of UFOs altogether.

NICAP had given it a good effort, but by the early 1960s it appeared to be spinning its wheels, with the Air Force getting the final word on the matter of UFOs. Then, something happened: UFO sightings across the United States increased to a crescendo that equaled the great wave of 1952, and surpassed it in duration. By 1966, as Vietnam and the civil rights movement pushed the United States toward a boil, the fight to end UFO secrecy reached its great crisis. That year, many amazing sightings had taken place, and UFOs were being discussed on the floor of Congress!

It was all for nothing, for 1966 was a year of failure. It was the turning point in which Ufology failed to turn. The great Japanese kendo master Miyamoto Musashi once wrote: “”when the enemy starts to collapse you must pursue him without letting the chance go. If you fail to take advantage of your enemies’’ collapse, they may recover.””

NICAP had been pressing for almost 10 years to force open congressional hearings on UFOs. They had quite an organization, and some real guts, I think, to challenge every year the Air Force on this matter. But in 1966, at the moment of peak crisis, the enemy did recover.

What follows is the story of how that happened.

During the 1960s, a period of tremendous challenge and change, many things were up for grabs. The fight to end UFO secrecy was one of those things. The enemy did start to collapse. Already, even during the 1950s, the Air Force had been trying to unload Blue Book to such agencies as the National Science Foundation and NASA. Good luck. It could more easily have sold Communism to J. Edgar Hoover. No one wanted Blue Book. It had a typical staff of one or two low-level personnel, a typist, and an officer. It was never a competent investigative body. To be fair, it was never intended to be one. Blue Book’’s real job was to appease the public with statements about a topic that the Air Force would rather have buried.

Unable to unload Blue Book, the Air Force also looked into disbanding it. This was a problem, too. Essentially, the Air Force had backed itself into a corner. Despite all the loaded statistics and all the heavy handed rhetoric, they continued to associate Blue Book with part of the overall effort to defend American air space and national security. So they really needed to prove to the public that all was solved, in some way that would be seen as plausible. By the time the great wave of the 1960s hit, they still hadn’’t figured it out.

In fact, the very existence of Blue Book was doing more damage than good, from the point of view of the Air Force. It was lending credibility to UFOs. It enabled UFO believers to ask “”if UFOs exist solely in the imagination, as the Air Force claims, why does it bother to investigate them?”” I think most basic of all, the Project heightened awareness of the very phenomenon the Air Force was trying to dismiss. Blue Book after all, was a government office which enabled UFO witnesses to feel credible and patriotic when they reported what they saw. That there was such a place at all encouraged people to look at the skies and notice such odd things.

A greater problem was that the public stopped believing the absurd explanations that the Air Force doled out. Jokes were becoming common. In the long term, the erosion of credibility threatened to become a big problem. Of course, military people had other pressing matters, such as Vietnam, to worry about. But being laughed at over flying saucers was not something the Air Force planned to accept for the long term.

All this had been manageable as long as the UFOs themselves –– or their reports –– remained scarce. That had generally been the case through the late 1950s and into the 60s. But sightings spiked upward in 1964, then increased again during the following year. The UFO wave of 1965 was a major global event. In fact, America’’s share was not even the most extraordinary. Even so, the tiny operation at Blue Book took in nearly one thousand reports that year. It boldly explained all but 16. Many of these explanations were labored, and it showed. That summer, for example, thousands of Midwesterners saw UFOs for several consecutive days, which the Air Force first explained as Orion (which was not visible in the northern hemisphere). After that explanation fell flat, Jupiter became the answer.

Thus, the intensity of the UFO wave, combined with Blue Book’’s lame explanations, caused a serious problem. UFOs were becoming a public burden the Air Force could neither carry nor throw off. Newspaper editorials ripped the Air Force and demanded better investigations. A couple of good jokes came in, too: one editorial asked “”do you ever get the feeling that … the Air Force makes its denials six months in advance?””

As sightings continued at an amazing pace in 1966, a new person entered the fray. That was James McDonald, a man of tremendous scientific accomplishment who made it his business to get to the bottom of all this. In 1966, McDonald got hold of a copy of the Robertson Panel Report, which he was not supposed to have seen; found himself at the office of Blue Book consultant Allen Hynek slamming his fist down on the table demanding to know why Hynek had sat on so many tremendous UFO reports without saying a word; reinvestigating many old UFO reports; meeting with researchers. McDonald could stir the pot well, and was the best catalyst Ufology has ever had. By the end of 1966 he was prominent in the news, making public statements about the UFO coverup in his particular forthright manner. There was nobody quite like James McDonald.

McDonald was devastating, and it was not simply because of his personality. It was also because of his expertise. He was an atmospheric physicist. Not an astronomer like Hynek or arch-debunker Donald Menzel. It’’s interesting how astronomers so easily are given special status as evaluators of UFO reports. Yes, there’’s the assumption that if UFOs are from other planets that means they’’re from outer space, and we all know that astronomers look at outer space. But no matter where UFOs are from, they are usually observed within our atmosphere, which was McDonald’’s domain. Frankly, many of Blue Book’’s or Menzel’’s threadbare explanations could not withstand the scrutiny of James McDonald. And from all accounts about him, the man was fearless, and knew his stuff. That’’s potentially dangerous combination.

The UFO wave became a major media event in March of 1966. Heavy activity was being reported that month in Michigan. Civilians, police, and military personnel reported disc-shaped UFOs, and Selfridge AFB confirmed that they tracked amazing objects on radar. On March 20, a man and his son saw an object with lights hovering over a swamp. It made a whistling sound as it left. The following night, more strange lights were reported near Hillsdale, which many people watched for hours.

These last two sightings received national attention. The rest is well known. The Air Force sent Hynek in, and he gave that disastrous press conference with a quote about “”swamp gas.”” His actual statement was actually rather nuanced, but it didn’’t matter. To the rest of the world, the Air Force never looked so incompetent and duplicitous on the matter of UFOs as it did at that moment. Project Blue Book’’s image was destroyed.

So here was the opportunity –– the chance for open congressional hearings on UFOs. On March 25, Congressman Gerald Ford called for an inquiry, and within two weeks, Congress held its first-ever open hearing on UFOs. Unfortunately, it was an exclusive, one-day-only affair. Three people were invited to testify: Air Force Secretary Harold Brown, Blue Book Chief Hector Quintanilla, and Hynek. This was not exactly an open hearing, and the results were predictable. Quintanilla and Brown said in effect there was nothing to it; Hynek said it demanded more study. Note that NICAP, which had pushed for ten years for a congressional hearing on this topic, had not even been invited.

All through the spring and summer of 1966, the Air Force hunted for a university to take the problem of UFOs far away from Blue Book. By the middle of summer, they had settled on the University of Colorado. There’’s been some great writing about the Colorado Project lately. We all know that, from the point of view of science, it was a disaster. And one whose conclusion appears to have been foregone.

On August 9, several months before the Air Force contract was announced, an infamous memorandum was written by a person at the University of Colorado who soon became the number two man of the UFO project. Although he was no scientist, Robert Low was a senior university administrator. He was also a former intelligence officer who appears, from at least one independent source, to have performed some serious work for the CIA in Albania twenty years earlier.[1] In his 1966 memo, Low addressed some senior university officials and laid out the strategy for handling the UFO problem. “”The trick would be,”” wrote Low,

“… to describe the project so that, to the public, it would appear a totally objective study, but to the scientific community would present the image of a group of nonbelievers trying their best to be objective but having an almost zero expectation of finding a saucer…”

The memorandum blew up a year later, after project members found it and leaked it. Some have argued that this statement is not as incriminating against Low as it seems. Well, that’’s not how people interpreted this 30-plus years ago. It seemed pretty straightforward to them.

The dice were loaded from the beginning. The project director, Edward Condon, knew nothing about UFOs, didn’’t want to know anything about UFOs, and in fact was deeply and emotionally invested against an ET answer to the issue. There was no way it was going to happen.

Here is the heart of the matter. What the Air Force –– or the CIA for that matter –– absolutely would not abide was a true, open, independent congressional hearing on UFOs. They had thwarted NICAP in this matter for ten years. And for good reason. There was a real danger that this was a problem that could easily evade their control. That was not an acceptable option. So at the moment of crisis in 1966, when the situation appeared that it might be up for grabs, the Air Force and its allies did not panic, but maintained the initiative. By selecting –– and paying –– a university to conduct a study on UFOs, the Air Force stood a much better chance of dealing with a known quantity. They could get a sense of who was going to be conducting the study. If I were in the position of the Air Force at that time, I would certainly rather have the chance to select the organization that would solve this problem, rather than to hand it to Congress, where anything could happen.

In October 1966, the Air Force announced it had awarded a contract to the University of Colorado to conduct a scientific study of UFOs. The effort, it was said, would be independent and serious. For the moment, all sides of the UFO debate were satisfied that, finally, someone was doing something about this. But it was a false satisfaction, and a grave illusion

The Colorado study, better known as the Condon Committee, was a scientific disaster that had one overriding virtue: it came to the exact conclusion the Air Force needed to dispose of Blue Book. By the end of 1969, Blue Book was closed. NICAP met its fate, as well. The month that the Air Force closed Blue Book, a group of men we now know were closely associated with the CIA wrested control of NICAP away from Major Keyhoe. The organization immediately began its spiral into oblivion.

Oh, and James McDonald? He was dead by 1971, of a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head.

As we look back at 1960s ufology standing at the city gates, we might ask ourselves: was there ever a true chance for success? The military and intelligence “handlers” of the UFO problem had resources and capabilities far beyond that of NICAP or any civilian researcher. Fifty years of ufology have shown time and again how civilians have underestimated the resources and resolve of the military-intelligence community to manage this problem. If we today cannot be confident that even the president is fully informed of UFO reality (who can say how much he really knows?), is it realistic to think that private organizations in the 1960s could have done any better? And what about today?

Ever since, people have met this phenomenon –– that is, UFOs –– on their own. There is no longer a government office where people can make reports. This is important for several reasons, and in my next article I will discuss the implications of this phenomenon not for the military, but for ordinary people.

Read More At: RichardDolanPress.com

[1] See Robin Winks, Cloak and Gown: Scholars in the Secret War, 1939-1961 (William Morrow and Company, 1987), pp. 396-397.

The Death Of James Forrestal


Source: RichardDolanPress.com
Richard Dolan
March 8, 2001

[This article is adapted from Richard Dolan’s UFOs and the National Security State: Chronology of a Cover-Up, 1941 to 1973, Hampton Roads Publishing, 2002. It appeared in the December 2001/January 2002 issue of UFO Magazine.]

Forrestal was taken home, but within a day the Air Force flew him to Hobe Sound, Florida, home of Robert Lovett (a future Secretary of Defense). Forrestal’s first words were “Bob, they’re after me.” He met with Dr. William Menninger, of the Menninger Foundation, and a consultant to the Surgeon General of the Army. Captain George N. Raines, chief psychologist at the U.S. Naval Hospital at Bethesda, soon arrived. It is not exactly clear what transpired during Forrestal’s brief stay in Florida. One story from Pearson was that Forrestal had several hysterical episodes and made at least one suicide attempt, certain that the Communists were planning an imminent invasion. Menninger explicitly denied this. He did say that upon his arrival, Forrestal told him that the day before, “he had placed a belt around his neck with the intention of hanging himself, but the belt broke.” But Menninger found no marks on Forrestal’s neck or body, nor did anyone find broken belts of any kind. Menninger considered Forrestal’s claim to be a nightmare. That’s about all we can know for sure.

On April 2, 1949, “for security reasons,” Forrestal’s coterie flew him to Bethesda. During the trip from the Air Field to the hospital, Forrestal made several attempts to leave the moving vehicle, and was forcibly restrained. He talked of suicide, of being a bad Catholic, and several times of those “who are trying to get me.” He was admitted to Bethesda under care of Raines, who diagnosed Forrestal’s illness as Involutional Melancholia, a depressive condition sometimes seen in people reaching middle age, often who saw their life as a failure. Upon arrival at Bethesda, Forrestal declared that he did not expect to leave the place alive. In a highly unusual decision for a suicidal patient, Forrestal’s doctor was instructed by “the people downtown” (e.g. national security) to place him in the VIP 16th floor suite.

[9/18/47: Stuart Symington sworn in as the nation’s first Secretary of the Air Force.Forrestal looks distracted.]

Meanwhile, Forrestal’s personal diaries, consisting of fifteen looseleaf binders totaling 3,000 pages, were removed from his former office and brought to the White House, where they remained for the next year. The White House later claimed that Forrestal had requested for Truman to take custody of the diaries. Such a claim, frankly, is preposterous. Throughout 1948, Forrestal had become increasingly alienated from Truman. Prior to the election, he had even met privately with leading Republicans to help insure his future with the Dewey administration. Truman then abruptly fired him in favor of Johnson, a man plainly not qualified for the job. Forrestal’s diaries contained sensitive information that Truman’s people needed to know about. Presumably they had ample time to review them during the seven weeks of Forrestal’s hospitalization.

Throughout Forrestal’s hospitalization, access to him was severely restricted. One-time visitors were his wife, his two sons, Sidney Souers (a former DCI, NSC executive secretary, and alleged MJ-12 member), Louis Johnson, Truman, and Congressman Lyndon Johnson. Menninger visited twice. Although Forrestal was presumably glad to see his sons, he was not close to any of these visitors, and had a political antipathy to his government colleagues who came by. However, Forrestal was not permitted to see the several people he continually asked to see: his brother, a friend, and two priests.Henry Forrestal, for example, repeatedly tried to see his brother but was refused until he threatened to tell the newspapers and sue the hospital. Ultimately, he was able to visit his brother four times. Henry told Raines and the hospital’s commandant, Captain B. W. Hogan, that his brother wanted to talk with a close friend, Monsignor Maurice Sheehy. Hogan replied that he was aware of this, but still would not allow it.Indeed, Sheehy had tried seven times to see Forrestal. Each time he was told his timing was “not opportune.” (What kind of hospital policy denies a patient the right to see a priest, minister, or rabbi?) Sheehan, a former Navy chaplain, argued several times with Raines, and had the impression that Raines was acting under orders. Another priest, Father Paul McNally of Georgetown University, was also barred from seeing Forrestal, as was at least one other (unnamed) friend of the former Secretary.

Still, by May, Forrestal was improving. When Henry finally got to see him, he thought his brother was “acting and talking as sanely and intelligently as any man I’ve ever known.” On May 14, 1949, Raines decided that he would leave Washington in four days to attend a meeting of the American Psychiatric Association. After their last meeting on the morning of the 18th, Raines wrote that Forrestal was “somewhat better than on the corresponding day of the preceding week.” Forrestal continued in good spirits throughout all of the 20th and 21st. He showed no signs of depression, was well dressed, shaved, and in good appetite.

But the more Henry Forrestal thought about his brother being shut up at Bethesda and denied the right to see Father Sheehy, the more it bothered him. He decided he was going to take his brother to the countryside to complete his recovery, and made train reservations to return to Washington on May 22. He also reserved a room at the Mayflower Hotel for that day, then phoned the hospital to announce that he would arrive on May 22 to take his brother.He was too late.

The official account of Forrestal’s death runs as follows. During the night of May 21/22, Forrestal was awake at 1:45 a.m., copying a chorus from Sophocles’s Ajaxfrom a book of world literature. (The New York Times added that Forrestal had been asleep at 1:30, then awake at 1:45.) A Navy corpsman named Robert Wayne Harrison, Jr., responsible for guarding Forrestal’s room, checked in, as was his job every fifteen minutes. Forrestal told Harrison that he did not want a sedative, as he intended to stay up late and read. Harrison reported Forrestal’s refusal to the psychiatrist – Raines’ assistant, Dr. Robert Deen – sleeping next door. They returned five minutes later to an empty room. Deen later claimed that Forrestal had sent Harrison out on a “brief errand.” During this time, Forrestal walked to the diet kitchen across the hall, tied one end of his bathrobe cord to the radiator, the other end around his neck, removed a flimsy screen, and jumped from the 16th floor. The cord came untied, and he fell to his death after hitting part of the building on the way down.

Forrestal’s most recent biographers discounted the possibility of murder, calling the Secretary’s death “a series of chance events.” Yet, discrepancies in the official suicide story were never clearly resolved, and several people close to Forrestal did not believe it. A biographer of Forrestal writing in the 1960s, noted that “even now . . . certain details have not been made public,” and that some believed Forrestal’s death to be “very much desired by individuals and groups who, in 1949, held great power in the United States.” Others went further, and maintained that Forrestal was murdered. Henry Forrestal, for one, believed strongly that “they” murdered his brother – they being either Communists or Jews within the government (Henry considered the Jewish connection because Forrestal’s geopolitics gave him a pro-Arab disposition).

Father Sheehy had reason to suspect murder. When he arrived at Bethesda Naval Hospital after learning of Forrestal’s death, an experienced-looking hospital corpsman approached him through the crowd. In a low, tense voice he said: “Father, you know Mr. Forrestal didn’t kill himself, don’t you?” Before Sheehy could respond or ask his name, others in the crowd pressed close, and the man quickly departed.

There are several odd elements concerning Forrestal’s final moments. First, the young corpsman guarding Forrestal – that is, Harrison – was a new man, someone Forrestal had never seen before. The regular guard during the midnight shift was absent without leave and, the story goes, had gotten drunk the night before. Harrison was the only person to have had direct contact with Forrestal in the moments before his death, and ultimately it was on his word only that the official account rested.

Also, Forrestal never finished writing the chorus from Sophocles, and in fact stopped in the middle of a word. Quite possibly, Forrestal had not even written the fragment that evening, especially if he had been asleep at 1:30 a.m. How reasonable is it to suppose that, sometime between 1:30 a.m. and 1:45 a.m., he woke up, got out some writing material, located a bleak poem within a huge anthology, copied out 17 lines, put on his robe, crossed the hall to the diet kitchen where he tightly wrapped and knotted his bathrobe cord around his neck and presumably tied the loose end to the radiator under the window; then climbed up on the window sill and jumped.

There is also an odd juxtaposition of a tightly knotted bathrobe cord around Forrestal’s neck and the assumption that he tied the other end so loosely to a radiator that it immediately came untied and allowed him to fall to his death. This radiator was a rather improbable gallows: it was about two feet long, the top was six inches below the sill, and it was attached to the wall with its base a good fifteen inches above the floor. But there was no evidence that the bathrobe cord had ever been tied to the small radiator in the first place. If the cord had snapped under Forrestal’s weight, one end would have been found still fastened to the radiator. The cord did not break, however, and there was not a mark on the radiator to indicate it had ever been tied there.

Bethesda Naval Hospital

Moreover, if Forrestal wanted to hang himself, why choose a tiny window by anchoring himself to a radiator when he much more easily have done the job from a door or sturdy fixture, such as the shower curtain rod in his own bathroom? On the other hand, if Forrestal wanted to go out the window, why bother with a cord? Why not simply jump, a far easier proposition? In sum, we do not know that the cord was ever tied to the radiator, but we do know is it was tied tightly to Forrestal’s neck.

Later inspection found heavy scuff marks outside the window sill and cement work. Proponents of the suicide theory claim these were made by Forrestal’s feet while he was hanging by the neck from the radiator, and perhaps that he belatedly changed his mind and tried to climb back in. But the scuff marks confirm no such thing. They could just as easily have been made by his struggle with someone pushing him out the window.

There are many other suspicious elements to this story, such as the decision to place Forrestal on the 16th floor. This was exactly opposite what medical opinion desired (the bottom floor of a nearby annex had been the first choice of his caretakers), but was pressed by unnamed individuals in Washington.Also, the official investigation of Forrestal’s death was as much of a sham as that of President Kennedy would be 14 years later. The hospital labeled his death a suicide before any investigation took place; the county coroner hurried over to confirm the hospital statements. In cases where there is even a slight possibility of murder, it is normal for a coroner to delay signing a death certificate until an investigation, an autopsy, and an inquest had been completed. This did not happen. Since the death occurred on a U.S. naval reservation, local police did not investigate. Instead, the head of the naval board of inquiry immediately announced he was “absolutely certain” that Forrestal’s death “could be nothing else than suicide.”

If we concede the possibility of murder, we must ask who and why? One can hardly credit the budget issue, which was settled by then and especially moot once Forrestal was out of office. One proponent of the murder theory blamed Communists within the U.S. government, or perhaps even the Soviet KGB/GPU. The reason, it was claimed, had to do with Forrestal’s diaries and plans for a book after his release from the hospital. Forrestal was an inveterate anti-Communist, and might have been perceived as problematic for agents of the Soviets. Moreover, the Soviets were no strangers to the art of staged suicides. Of course, neither were the Americans.

But there is at least one other avenue to consider.

UFOs constitute the great hole of contemporary history. We know, at the very least, that this was a topic of great concern to those at the top of American national security policy, despite the near-complete absence of public references to it. It is the proverbial elephant in the dining room that no one wishes to discuss. There are several reasons to consider a UFO connection to Forrestal’s death.

In the first place, Forrestal’s position within the defense community made him de facto a key player in the formulation of UFO policy. Because of the key importance, even urgency, associated with this topic in policy formulation during the late 1940s, we must assume that Forrestal was involved. The sensitivity of the UFO problem meant that Forrestal’s mental deterioration was a real security risk. One might even wonder whether Forrestal learned a truth about UFOs that contributed to his breakdown.

After all, consider the recent developments of the UFO problem for American national security policymakers. By 1948 (if not earlier, e.g. Roswell), it was becoming clear that the Soviets were not responsible for UFOs, and neither were the Americans. It was equally clear that well qualified military observers and equipment had tracked these objects at speeds and maneuvering capabilities that were impossible with contemporary technology.

In the spring of 1948, White Sands Proving Ground in New Mexico had been the scene of an extraordinary UFO sighting that was analyzed in secret by the Air Force Scientific Advisory Panel and security personnel at Los Alamos. The investigating team decided that UFOs were “of extreme importance.”

That summer, another incredible case occurred, which resulted in the famed “Estimate of the Situation” stating the extraterrestrial thesis as an answer to UFOs. This was shot down by Air Force Commander Hoyt Vandenberg. Even so, President Truman began receiving regular briefings that summer on UFOs from his Air Force liaison, Colonel Robert Landry (coordinated with the CIA). Such briefings lasted through the remainder of his presidency.

By the end of 1948, the curious and unexplained “green fireball” phenomenon began appearing in very localized fashion over Los Alamos. This, too, receivedextreme levels of attention from America’s military and scientific elite, and did not (and do not) appear to be natural phenomena. In short, UFOs mattered a great deal within defense circles, and Forrestal was at the hub.

Secondly, Forrestal’s concern about being followed by “foreign-looking men” is a common description of the legendary-to-the-point-of-cliché Men in Black. He never stated clearly just who he believed to be following him, at least not consistently. Others assumed that he was talking about Communists, Jews, and Washington insiders, but they could only assume.

Drawing of the 16th Floor of the U.S. Naval Hospital at Bethesda. Forrestal’s room (A) shared a bath with his supervising doctor; he fell through a small, unsecured, window in the Diet Kitchen (B).

Then there is the disconcerting relationship with Air Force Secretary Symington. True, Symington considered Forrestal to be an enemy. But why, in the moment of Forrestal’s departure from politics, amid a spectacular psychological collapse, did Symington take it upon himself to have a secret conversation with Forrestal that left him utterly incoherent? This goes beyond mere conventional political maneuvering: what did Symington say – or do – to Forrestal? At least one senior military person linked Symington to a type of UFO “control group,” and that was General Arthur Exon, former base commander of Wright-Patterson AFB, in an interview he gave in 1990. According to Exon, Symington was one of the “unholy thirteen,” one of those who knew the most about Roswell. Forrestal, said Exon, was another.

An explanation centering on the UFO phenomenon accounts surprisingly well for the complete unhinging of a successful and brilliant individual, and more importantly, the need to silence someone who could no longer be trusted.

Perhaps Forrestal’s psychological state was such that he did commit suicide. Although the facts of his death do not point toward this conclusion, we do not have definitive knowledge, either. But consider the case of American journalist George Polk. A year before, Polk had been investigating corruption in the Greek military regime, elements of which then murdered him. The Communists were promptly blamed, while America’s intelligence and media communities knowingly went along with the charade. Or, just a few years later, in 1953, when American biological weapons expert Frank Olsen “fell” from the 10th floor of the Statler Hotel in New York City, after he had a very bad LSD trip, courtesy of the CIA, and had become a security risk.

During the bad old days of Stalin’s Russia, airbrushed photographs were a normal, if crude, way to sanitize history. American methods are less crude, but no less normal.

Richard M. Dolan, 2001

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Notes: Perhaps not surprisingly, there are precious few sources on Forrestal. See Arnold Rogow, James Forrestal, A Study of Personality, Politics, and Policy (MacMillan, 1963); Townsend Hoopes & Douglas Brinkley, Driven Patriot: The Life and Times of James Forrestal (Knopf, 1992); the extremely rare Cornell Simpson, The Death of James Forrestal (Western Islands Publishers, 1966); and the sanitized The Forrestal Diaries edited by Walter Mills (Viking Press, 1951).

 

Science, Secrecy, And Ufology

Secrecy
Source: RichardDolanpress.com
Richard Dolan
December 26, 2000

Secrecy permeates the UFO field. What does this mean for Ufology as a science? Answer: the field cannot really be handled scientifically within the public domain. The great model is the Manhattan Project. When a project is undertaken at highly classified levels, you will find nothing of value about it within the mainstream. This was true during the development of the atomic bomb in the 1940s; it is true regarding the UFO.

Missing the Obvious

Somethings are so obvious that they are invisible.

Segments of the intelligence community have been intensely interested in UFOs since the problem emerged after World War Two. Moreover, they have monitored and infiltrated the UFO field. Conversely, the “mainstream” (as opposed to “classified”) scientific community has ignored UFOs altogether. Ask yourself a simple question: why this discrepancy?

What passes for Ufology has spun its wheels for fifty years. Not only have even its most important researchers been unable to force recognition of the problem by official powers (not very surprising, after all), but some of these same researchers have not even taken a definite stand on what UFOs might represent. That is, they have been working without a hypothesis (!) and so in many cases have merely piled up sighting after sighting for years and years, and then expected this pile of “evidence” to do the trick. But in any intellectual endeavor, piling up evidence is never enough. The researcher has to organize and analyze the evidence through hypothesis or supposition. Without this effort, there is no research, only what Gore Vidal calls “scholarly squirreling” of data in a hole in a hollow tree. What can we say about such researchers, some of whom having been in the field for decades, or even in some cases, generations? What have they been doing?

A young innocent who wants to learn more about this topic – a subject of the utmost seriousness and importance – can easily become bewildered by the confusion. Should one side with Klass, Shaeffer, and Korff, or Hynek, Ruppelt, and Keyhoe, or Friedman, or Randall? Does one follow the line of the conservative J. Allen Hynek Center of UFO Studies (CUFOS), the paranormal leanings of MUFON, or the coverup themes of UFO Magazine? On the Internet, should one haunt the tepid world of listserves like Project 1947 or UFO Updates, or dive right into John Greenwald’s Black Vault?

Four centuries ago, Rene Descartes established a very simple principle of knowledge: one must create a strong skeleton – that is, a foundation of unquestionable facts – and build an edifice upon it.

So let us be Cartesian, and review the obvious.

Secrecy and the National Security Crowd

In 1946, a year before the great deluge of reports here in the states, Americans monitored “ghost rockets” over Europe. Two prominent American generals conferred with the Swedes, and censorship over the Swedish press followed. The Greek Army also investigated, according to Dr. Paul Santorini, a key scientist in the development of the atomic bomb. The Greeks concluded the objects were not Soviet, nor were they missiles. The American military then pressured them into silence.

In 1947, UFOs appeared over American skies in large numbers. Some incidents were quite serious, such as the repeated violation of air space over the Oak Ridge Nuclear Facility. Oak Ridge housed some of the most sophisticated technology in the world and was highly classified: one did not simply fly over there. Yet Army Intelligence and the FBI monitored dozens of intrusions over Oak Ridge well into the 1950s. Similar violations occurred over sensitive places in Los Alamos, Hanford, and many military bases. All of this was classified, of course. Americans knew nothing about them at the time.

In a classified memo, General Nathan Twining wrote of the possibility – based on the careful evaluation of military personnel – that “some of the objects are controlled.” Controlled by whom was the $64,000 question, and America’s national security establishment set out to answer it, far removed from the prying eyes of the public.

In 1949, an FBI memo stated that: “Army intelligence has recently said that the matter of ‘unidentified aircraft’ or ‘unidentified aerial phenomena’ … is considered top secret by intelligence officers of both the Army and the Air Forces.”

In 1950, Robert Sarbacher, a physicist with the DOD Research & Development Board, privately told Canadian official Wilbert Smith that UFOs were “the most highly classified subject in the U.S. government.”

After an extraordinary UFO encounter near Fort Monmouth, New Jersey in 1951, Air Force officer Edward Ruppelt attended a two-hour meeting chaired by General Charles Cabell, the Director of Air Force Intelligence (and later Deputy CIA Director). The meeting was recorded, but the tape “was so hot that it was later destroyed. . . . to be conservative, it didn’t exactly follow the tone of the official Air Force releases.”

The CIA, meanwhile, had monitored the problem since at least 1948. After the UFO wave of 1952, the Agency sponsored the Robertson Panel, which convened in January 1953 – the final weekend of the Truman presidency. The panel debunked UFOs, and its recommendations resulted in the gutting of Project Blue Book (already a public relations burden) and heightened surveillance of civilian UFO organizations.

Clearly, this was an issue considered to be of the utmost seriousness. As a result, it was not a topic ordinary citizens could simply waltz into and get easy answers. Observe what happened to the most dangerous of all civilian organizations: the National Investigative Committee on Aerial Phenomena (NICAP). Founded in 1956 with the goal of ending UFO secrecy, it was quickly and secretly infiltrated by “ex-CIA” officers involved in CIA psychological warfare operations. The most important of them, Colonel Joseph Bryan, was the key player in the ouster of Director Donald Keyhoe in 1969. A succession of CIA men then ran NICAP into the ground. Needless to say, no one outside the Agency knew of their CIA connections.

One might complain this was all a long time ago. Does the military still take UFOs seriously? Does the intelligence community still infiltrate UFO organizations? After all, if UFOs are still important, then intelligence operatives would presumably still need to monitor and influence the key organizations. Is there any reason to believe this is so?

In a word, yes. The military still encounters UFOs, as many reports continue to prove. Moreover, secrecy orders about UFOs remain in effect. In 1975, the late Senator Barry Goldwater stated that UFOs were still classified “above Top Secret.” As one of my Navy acquaintances recently said to me: “If I were to tell you what I knew about that subject, I would probably go to prison.”

In the mid-1980s, UFO researcher William Moore admitted to working covertly with the intelligence world, to the shock and dismay of his colleagues. But stuff like this is surely the tip of a large iceberg. Ufology is dominated by men and women connected to the world of intelligence, usually through prior experience in the military or CIA. Why is this so? What does it mean to Ufology that this is the case? It is a question I will return to – more than once, I suspect – in future articles.

Science

Throughout history, people have used outdated concepts to think about the world, especially during periods of rapid change. It’s unavoidable. We remain wedded to the concepts we learned in our youth, while reality races ahead. Observe our cultural attitudes toward science. Science, we were taught, is a bastion, indeed the foundation, of intellectual freedom in the world. It is an independent search for truth, and the destroyer of social and religious myths.

How independent is science? In whose interest is it practiced today? This is no idle question, for gone are the days of scientists following their intellectual passions in a search for truth. Earlier this year, James Lovelock, a pioneer in environmental science now in his eighties, had this to say:

Nearly all scientists are employed by some large organization, such as a governmental department, a university, or a multinational company. Only rarely are they free to express their science as a personal view. They may think that they are free, but in reality they are, nearly all of them, employees; they have traded freedom of thought for good working conditions, a steady income, tenure, and a pension.

Science is an expensive business, and you need sponsorship. I laughed out loud when a sincere and interested reader of my book asked me who sponsored my research. But, he is a scientist, for whom such a thing is absolutely necessary.

Reflect on the following:

  1. Since the Second World War, the military has been by far the biggest sponsor of scientific work.
  2. The military and intelligence community has exhibited extreme levels of interest in the UFO phenomenon, and high levels of classification have enveloped the subject.
  3. It would seem logical that the military has sponsored classified – that is, secret – scientific work on this problem for many years.
  4. In public, however, mainstream scientists offer nothing more than ridicule or scorn upon the topic of UFOs

Like any other segment of our civilization, scientists follow the money. If the cash is there, so are they; if not, forget about it. If, as I believe, the vast sponsorship of UFO research is classified, we will not hear positive statements about the subject from the mainstream. Moreover, the extreme specialization of science ensures that mavericks do not stray into the uncharted seas of UFO research. The result is widespread ignorance by scientists of even the basics of the UFO phenomenon. At least, this is so within the non-classified, mainstream areas of research. In the classified world, we can only surmise, but we can do so based on some facts.

We know without question that within the first few years of the appearance of UFOs, many top-flight scientists became involved in some way with this phenomenon – in every case at the classified level. By no means exhaustive, here are some of the more noteworthies: Lloyd Berkner, Edward Teller, Detlev Bronk, Vannevar Bush, David Sarnoff, Thornton Page, H. P. Robertson, Allen Hynek, and Lincoln La Paz. In the case of Bush and Bronk, the connection has not been proven to the satisfaction of some skeptics, but even in their case, the evidence remains strong. For the rest, the case is open-and-shut. These men were some of the elite power scientists in the world, and intimately connected with the American defense establishment. And yet, we find them looking at UFO reports. Of course, let us not forget Harvard astronomer and UFO debunker extraordinaire, Donald Menzel, who, unbeknownst to the world, was deeply involved with the American intelligence community, in particular the super-secret National Security Agency.

One supposes that we shall have to wait another few decades to learn about our contemporaries – in other words, long after the issue becomes moot. Such secrecy, we realize, is not unique to UFOs. It is standard operating procedure. We learn the truth after it becomes irrelevant.

The Great Secrecy Model

As was stated above, when a project is undertaken at highly classified levels, you will find nothing of value about it within the mainstream. The primordial example is the Manhattan Project. Here was an undertaking of such magnitude that secrecy was of paramount importance. How to design and build an atomic bomb without the enemy knowing? It is, of course, a multifarious question. One of the answers, however, was to hide the knowledge from Congress itself – despite the fact that it involved unprecedented outlays of money. Amazingly, the plan succeeded.

In fact, when scientists detonated a nuclear bomb at Los Alamos on July 16, 1945, the most spectacular and ominous event in the history of science, no one outside that small classified circle knew a thing. Consider the implications. The work was done in a secrecy so profound that the mainstream scientific literature had nothing of import to say about nuclear technology. The information was too sensitive to discuss openly.

Significantly, though the Manhattan Project remained secret from the public, it was not secret from the Soviets, who had penetrated the American defense and scientific establishment, and used data from the project to build an atomic bomb years ahead of schedule. This pattern, in fact, recurred throughout the Cold War: more often than not, the American public was kept in the dark about black projects more successfully than were the Soviet authorities. Many times, it was they and not the Soviets who were the true target of secrecy – for instance, in such cases as the U-2 flyovers or mind control experiments.

Thus, the Manhattan Project possesses staggering historical importance for so many reasons, not the least of which is that it has served as a model ever since for conducting expensive and covert operations. Hiding the money, keeping the real talk classified, and steering the public discussion – all of these were successfully tackled by the national security world of the 1940s.

If it’s important, it’s probably secret. This was true during the development of the atomic bomb in the 1940s; it is almost certainly true regarding the UFO.

Implications

Those of us without a “need to know” about UFOs can still learn a few things. Enough information exists within the public realm that we can put many of the pieces together. It is, frankly, what I have tried to do in my recent study.

Do the math. For more than fifty years, millions of people have experienced a global phenomenon from agencies unknown, possessing what appears to be fantastic technology. We have on record hundreds of military UFO encounters and reports, with undoubted interest and infiltration by the intelligence world. Compound this with disturbingly strong claims of abduction (and even worse) on the part of these others, and you have powerful reasons for abject silence on the part of our erstwhile leaders.

The math is not higher calculus. No, it is simple addition, and when you add it up the conclusion is forced: this is a fundamentally covert event of awesome magnitude.

But we should not fool ourselves into thinking that we can “get to the bottom” of this. That is, as mere citizens of what some would call an oligarchic empire that masquerades as a democracy, we are unlikely to get official confirmation regarding something as important as an alien presence. And even if we did get such “confirmation,” could we truly depend on the accuracy and completeness of the information? I think you know the answer.

Knowledge may give us an edge in some way. Or, our situation may more closely match the American natives of 500 years ago. Either way, we on the outside are on our own where this phenomenon is concerned, and it behooves us to become as educated about it as we can. Otherwise, we experience our fate – for good or ill – in the dark.

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