“The Politics of Schooling” – John Taylor Gatto

Source: John Taylor Gatto TV
January 29, 2017

John Gatto is the former NY City and NY State Teacher of the year [1991], where he inspired his students to achieve some amazing results through his nontraditional methods of instruction.

In this video Gatto discusses issues with the Public Schooling system that continues to churn out less and less capable and more dumbed down students each and every year.

If you read additional information as to why the public schooling continues to fail, please read:

The Catastrophic Decline Of Public Schooling: 21 Facts About Why Public Schooling Performs So Poorly

The above includes an excerpt from John Taylor Gatto’s phenomenal book, A Different Kind Of Teacher.  Gatto is also author of the poignant book, Dumbing Us Down – The Hidden Curriculum of Public SchoolingIn it, Gatto minces no words when he states:

Schools are intended to produce, through the application of formulas, formulaic human beings whose behavior can be predicted and controlled.”[1][Bold Emphasis Added]

It is absurd and anti-life to be part of the system that compels you to sit in confinement with people of exactly the same age and social class.  That system effectively cuts you off from the immense diversity of life and the synergy of variety; indeed it cuts you off from your own past and future, sealing you in a continuous present much the same way television does.”[2][Bold Emphasis Added]

______________________________________________________
Sources & References:

[1] John Taylor Gatto, Dumbing Us Down – The Hidden Curriculum Of Compulsory Schooling, pg. 23.
[2] Ibid., pg. 24

“The Seven-Lesson School Teacher” – HIDDEN CURRICULUM – John Taylor Gatto

Source: John Taylor Gatto TV
John Taylor Gatto
January 24, 2017

John Gatto is the former NY City and NY State Teacher of the year, where he inspired his students to achieve some amazing results through his nontraditional methods of instruction.

In this video Gatto discusses issues with the Public Schooling system that continues to churn out less and less capable and more dumbed down students each and every year.

If you read additional information as to why the public schooling continues to fail, please read:

The Catastrophic Decline Of Public Schooling: 21 Facts About Why Public Schooling Performs So Poorly

The above includes an excerpt from John Taylor Gatto’s phenomenal book, A Different Kind Of Teacher.

“Everything You’ve Been Taught About Success in Life is Wrong” – John Taylor Gatto

Source: JohnTaylorGatto
January 20, 2017

John is the former New York State Teacher of the Year and “The World’s Most Courageous Teacher.”

John Gatto is the former NY City and NY State Teacher of the year, where he inspired his students to achieve some amazing results through his nontraditional methods of instruction.

Find solutions at:
http://www.EducationOptionsNow.org
https://www.AlternativesToSchool.com
https://www.EducationRevolution.org
https://www.Altedaustin.org
https://www.EducationTransformationAl
https://www.LearningChoicesNetwork.com
https://www.A2Zhomescooling.com
https://www.HomeEducationMagazine.com
https://www.Montessori.org
https://www.CasaDiMir.org
https://www.SudVal.org
https://www.AgileLearningCenters.org
https://www.DiabloValleySchool.org
https://www.UnCollege.org
https://www.ZTcollege.com
https://www.ClassDismissedMovie.com
https://www.SchoolSucksProject.com
https://www.TragedyAndHope.com

The Catastrophic Decline Of Public Schooling: Twenty One Facts About Why Public Schooling Performs So Poorly

education
TheBreakaway
Zy Marquiez
January 18, 2017

“The historical record indicates that, if anything, the implicit collectivist impulse in standardized testing stands in stark contrast to the basic values of individual genius and responsibility that formed the central core of the founding of the republic itself.”[A][Bold Emphasis added][Dr. Joseph P. Farrell and Gary Lawrence, Rotten to the (Common) Core, pg. 5.]

“…such tests in the end punish, rather than reward, real ability, with the end result that such tests really measure the ability of an individual to conform to the outlook and interests of the elites composing such tests…”[B][Bold Emphasis added][Dr. Joseph P. Farrell and Gary Lawrence, Rotten to the (Common) Core, pg. 57.]

Every day, its growing more apparent that the current system of public schooling isn’t progressing from the relentless push for standardized testing we’ve been told would benefit public schooling.

It is no secret that US public education schooling keeps plowing down the mountain of stupidity/mediocrity.  And yet, we might have just reached new all time lows.

In recent news reported by ZeroHedge.com, new studies found that the United States performed dismally when compared to other developed nations in education.

The Article, “U.S. Kids Keep Getting Dumber; Ranked 31st out of 35 Developed Nations In Math, New Study Reveals” reveals that:

Our schools no longer teach reading, writing, and arithmetic.  Rather than be taught how to think and problem-solve, children are thought what to think and how to feel. All these money-making and money-spending schemes tend to sound nice, of course, but they inevitably fall flat.”[1][Bold Emphasis Added]

If this exacerbating/disturbing issue continues unabated, the US will continue to morph into the mindless police/technocratic/fascist state that it’s torpedoing towards, but at an increasing rate.

But it gets better!

The Unites States also ranked 24th in the world in reading literacy and 25th in science.

To illustrate some of the insidious reasons this is taking place, let’s take a gander at what award winning teacher with over 30 years of experience John Taylor Gatto has stated.

In his phenomenal book, A Different Kind OF Teacher, Gatto outlines 21 facts about schooling that we should all privy to:

1.  There is no relationship between the amounts of money spent on schooling and “good” results as measured by parents of any culture.  This seems to be because education is not a commodity to be purchased but an enlargement of insight, power, understanding and self-control almost completely outside the cash economyEducation is almost overwhelmingly an internally generated effort.  The five American states which usually spend least per capita on schooling are the five which usually have the best test results (although Iowa which is about thirtieth in spending sometimes creeps into the honored circle).

2.  There is no compelling evidence to show a positive relationship between length of schooling and accomplishmentMany countries with short school years outperform those with long ones by a wide margin.

3.  Most relationships between test scores and job performance are illegitimate, arranged in advance by only allowing those testing well access to the work.  Would you hire a newspaper reporter because he had “A”s in English?  Have you ever asked a surgeon what grade he got in meat-cutting?  George F. Kennan, intellectual darling of the Washington elite some while ago and the author of our “containment” policy against the Soviet Union often found his math and science grades in secondary school below sixty, and at Princeton he had many flunks, “D”s and “C”s.  “Sometimes,” he said, “it is the unadjusted student struggling to forge his own standards who develops within himself the thoughtfulness to comprehend.”  Dean Acheson, Harry Truman’s Secretary of State, graduated from Groton with a sixty-eight average…Is there anybody out there who really believes that grades and test scores are the mark of a man?

4.  Training done on the job is invariably cheaper, quicker, and of much higher quality than training done in a school setting.  If you wonder why that should be, you want to start, I think, by understanding that training and education are two different things, one largely residing in the development of good habits, the other in the development of vision and understanding, judgment, and the like.  Education is self training; it calls into its calculations mountains of personal data and experience which are simply unobtainable by any schoolteacher or higher pedagogueThat simple fact is why all the many beautifully precise rules on how to think produce such poor results.

5.  In spite of relentless propaganda on the contrary, the American economy is tending strongly to require less knowledge and less intellectually ability of its employees, not more.  Scientists and mathematicians currently exists in numbers far exceeding any global demand for them or any national demand, and that condition should grow much worse over the next decade, thanks to the hype of pedagogues and politicians. Schools can be reconstructed to teach children to development intellect, resourcefulness, and independence, but that would lead, in short order, to structural changes in the economy so profound it is not likely to be allowed to happen.

6.  The habits, drills, and routines of government schooling sharply reduce a person’s chances of possessing initiative or creativity.  Furthermore, the mechanism of why this is so hard has been well understood for centuries.

7.  Teachers are paid as specialists but they almost never have any real world experience in their specialties; indeed the low quality of their training has been a scandal for eighty years.

8.  A substantial amount of testimony exists from highly regarded scientists like Richard Feynman, the recently deceased Nobel laureate, or Albert Einstein, and many others, that scientific discovery is negatively related to the procedures of school science classes.

9.  According to research published by Christopher Jencks, the famous sociologist, and others as well, the quality of school which any students attend is a very bad predictor of later success, financial, social, or emotional.  On the other hand the quality of family life is very good predictorThat would seem to indicate a natural family policy directly spending on the home, not the school.

10.  Children learn fastest and easiest when very young; general intelligence has probably developed as far as it will by the age of four.  Children are quite capable of reading and enjoying difficult material by that age, and also capable of performing all the mathematical operations skillfully and with pleasureWhether kids should do these things or not is a matter of philosophy or cultural tradition, not a course dictated by any scientific knowledge.

11.  There is a direct relationship between heavy doses of teaching and detachment from reality with subsequent flights into fantasyMany students so oppressed lose their links with past and present, present, and future.  And the bond with “now” is substantially weakened.

12.  Unknown to the public, virtually all famous remedial programs have failedPrograms like Title I/Chapter I survive by the goodwill of political allies, not by results.

13.  There is no credible evidence that racial mixing has any positive effect on student performance, but a large body of suggestive data is emerging that confining one group of children with children of a dominant culture does harm to the smaller group.

14.  Forced busing has accelerated the disintegration of minority neighborhoods without any visible academic benefits as trade off.

15.  There is no reason not to believe that any existing education technology can significantly improve intellectual performance; on the contrary, to the extent that machines establish the goals and work schedules, ask the questions and monitor the performances, the already catastrophic passivity and indifference created by schooling only increases.

16.  There is no body of knowledge inaccessible to a motivated elementary student.  The sequences of development we use are hardly the product of “science” but instead are legacies of unstable men like Pestalozzi and Froebel, and the military governments from which we imported them.

17.  Delinquent behavior is a direct reaction to the structure of schooling.  It is much worse than the press has reported because all urban school districts conspire to suppress its prevalence.  Teachers who insist on justice on behalf of pupils and parents are the most frequently intimidated into silence.

18.  The rituals of schooling remove flexibility from the mind – that characteristic vital in adjusting to different situations.  Schools strive for uniformity in a world increasingly less uniform.

19.  Teacher-training courses are widely held in contempt by practicing teachers as well as by the general public because research has consistently failed to provide guidance to best practice.

20.  Schools create and maintain a caste system, separating children according to irrelevant parameters. Poor, working class, middle class and upper middle class kids are constantly made aware of alleged differences among themselves by the use of methods not called for by the task at hand.

21. Efforts to draw a child out of his culture or his social class has an immediate effect on his family relationships, friendships, and the stability of his self-image.[2][Bold & Underline Emphasis Added].

How can such dismal results be rectified?

In respect to this glaring issue, Gatto has not only spoken at length about scraping the public schooling system, but also speaking incisively and cogently about:

“The only way I can see after spending thirty-five years in and around the institution is to put full choice squarely back into the hands of parents, let the marketplace redefine schooling, and encourage the development of as many styles of schooling as there are human dreamsLet people, not bureaucrats, work out their own destinies.  That’s what made us a great country in the first place.”[111-115 – A Different Kind OF Teacher][Bold & Italic Emphasis Added][2]

Those reasons and more is why it’s imperative that individuals take full control of our destinies and education as individuals.  For if we do not, others certainly will.

The less individuals respect and appreciate true education and historical tradition, the more they shackle themselves to the comptrollers seeking control via a top-down technocratic society.  And if one were to seek total control of a society, vanquishing any semblance of education would be priority number one.

And as Gatto states, that’s exactly what they want.

The truth is that:

“…schools and schooling are increasingly irrelevant to the great enterprises of the planet.  No one believes anymore that scientists are trained in science classes or politicians in civics classes or poets in English classes.  The truth is that schools don’t really teach anything except how to obey orders.”[3] [Bold Emphasis]

To finalize, Gatto will be quoted at length, because he does a fantastic job at outlining what individuals can do:

Refuse to be trivialized by an economic order that assigns important work to titles like “Doctor of Philosophy” instead of to men and women.  Hold the authorities who clear-cut our forest and poison our water in contempt not awe.

Sabotage their undertakings in any way you can, even as small as misfiling their papers or dragging your feet on the way to jail.  Keeping score by income and status is a mark of a limited mind; past a modest point your possessions, your machines, and your tittles begin to own youPast a modest point they dictate your behavior, consume your time, dominate your human relations – and when that happens you have become a machine, however well fed and secure you are.  Instead, affirm a world of moral seriousness where everyday things are sacred to you.  When that happens the leaves and grass and water sprarkle and shine, lighting up the darkness.  When that happens you are wealthy beyond measure.

Trust in yourself.  Reject the insane claims that technological progress is human progress, that human destiny and machine improvement are wrapped up together in some way.  They are not.  The spirit of machinery seeks to infect living things and make them like machinery, too – that is, at the bottom of the cynical global system of industrial development.  Better to be John Henry than the steam hammer; better to be an outlaw than a votary if it comes down to that.  Live free or you won’t really be alive at all.  That, I can guarantee, really matters.”[4][Bold Emphasis added]

_______________________________________________________
Sources And References

[A] Dr. Joseph P. Farrell and Gary Lawrence, Rotten to the (Common) Core, pg. 5.
[B] Ibid., Pg. 57.
[1] John Taylor Gatto, A Different Kind Of Teacher, pg. 111-115.
[2] Ibid., pg. 115.
[3] John Taylor Gatto, Dumbing Us Down – The Hidden Curriculum Of Compulsory Schooling, pg. 21.
[4] John Taylor Gatto, A Different Kind Of Teacher, pg. 211.

Book Review: A Different Kind Of Teacher by John Taylor Gatto

a-different-kind-of-teacher
TheBreakaway
Zy Marquiez
January 16, 2017

John Taylor Gatto is an award winning teacher and recipient of the New York State Teacher Of The Year Award with over 30 years experience within the public school system.  Many of the lessons he’s learned are expounded upon at length in his books, which continue to gain popularity with every passing year.

For me, A Different Kind Of Teacher follows a reading of Gatto’s book Dumbing Us Down – The Hidden Curriculum Of Compulsory Schooling.  In it Gatto did a phenomenal job of outlining many of the most insidious issues taking place with the current public school system.  The precision and pull-no-punches approach of Gatto’s work is what made Dumbing Us Down so notable, especially considering that he most pulled no punches when he stated that the main agenda of the public school system is to indoctrinate individuals how to follow orders so they can become unthinking cogs in the machine.

A snippet of some of Gatto’s most important points in Dumbing Us Down are:

“…schools and schooling are increasingly irrelevant to the great enterprises of the planet.  No one believes anymore that scientists are trained in science classes or politicians in civics classes or poets in English classes.  The truth is that schools don’t really teach anything except how to obey orders.”[1]

Schools are intended to produce, through the application of formulas, formulaic human beings whose behavior can be predicted and controlled.”[2]

It is absurd and anti-life to be part of the system that compels you to sit in confinement with people of exactly the same age and social class.  That system effectively cuts you off from the immense diversity of life and the synergy of variety; indeed it cuts you off from your own past and future, sealing you in a continuous present much the same way television does.”[3]

Scathing remarks such as the above leave no doubt Gatto’s quest for individuals is that of true education, and not the facsimile of it as we’ve been sold over time.

With that said, his other phenomenal book, A Different Kind Of Teacher – Solving The Crisis Of American Schooling by John Taylor Gato is a fierce examination into not only public schooling and its many inherent flaws, but also what type of steps are required to be carried out by individuals in order to transcend the current bankrupt/corrupt system from its current miserable state and into a more robust, grounded and resonant system that doesn’t sell out to corporate/government interests.

One intricate notion Gatto explores regards education in the past, which was considerably different than what it is now.  For instance, in Colonial America literacy rates were exceedingly high with no compulsory schooling whatsoever.  The same cannot be said of now.  In fact, one theme that Gatto convincingly explores is the damage inflicted on the human psyche through the many years of compulsory schooling.

When the reader reflects on how such actions instill the conditioning of the mind, and force it not to think but simply accept what it’s told, one arrives at the understanding of how a large part of society in this country continue to willingly accept the idea of public schools as a good thing

Thankfully, not everyone is following that pattern.  With more and more families continuing to homeschool their children, and individuals seeking to become autodidacts, considerable change is taking place at the grassroots level.

And much of that change is taking place in large part by individuals such as John Taylor Gatto, who are relentless in not only mincing no words in calling the system for what it is, but also by offering solutions to individuals seeking such.

Regardless, each of one of us are inherently responsible for our own continuing education.  When we pass that responsibility to the state, such as John Taylor Gatto has showed, we come to terms with the desolate fact of the education system’s cataclysmic decline.

The only way to stop such a system from continuing in tsunami-like fashion sweeping over everyone and everything is at the grass roots level, at the local level.

If we don’t, the country our forefathers conquered will be a ghost of the past, barely a facsimile of its former self, and the future will prove to be even murkier than now.

As Gatto elucidates:

“Figure out what matters.  Do it yourself; work hard at it; no one else can do it for you.  Relying on others in this regard or ignoring the necessity will ruin you thought you sit surrounded by machines in a rich school watching videos of spaceships.  Each of us has a design problem to solve:  to create from the raw material around us the curriculum for a good life.  It isn’t easy and it isn’t the same for any two people.  If you think you can buy it, look around you at the shambles my own generation has made of communal life and family life by trying to buy it or fashion it with machinery.”[4]

———————————————————-
Sources:

[1] John Taylor Gatto, Dumbing Us Down – The Hidden Curriculum Of Compulsory Schooling, pg. 21.
[2] Ibid., pg. 23.
[3] Ibid., pg. 24.
[4] John Taylor Gatto, A Different Kind Of Teacher, pg. 208.

Breakaway Post Of 2016: How A Generation Lost Its Common Culture by Professor Patrick Deneen

[Editor’s Note]

Out of all the articles/news/information mirrored, this was the most incisive by far.

Professor Patrick Deneen speaks at length as to the myriad reasons why the culture is declining and what type of transformation is taking place in society.

If there’s one thing you read today, let it be this, for the concerns shared by Professor Deneen do not only seep into our present state, but will echo into the future, whether we like it or not.

culture

Source: MindingTheCampus.org
Professor Patrick Deneen
February 2, 2016

My students are know-nothings. They are exceedingly nice, pleasant, trustworthy, mostly honest, well-intentioned, and utterly decent. But their brains are largely empty, devoid of any substantial knowledge that might be the fruits of an education in an inheritance and a gift of a previous generation. They are the culmination of western civilization, a civilization that has forgotten nearly everything about itself, and as a result, has achieved near-perfect indifference to its own culture.

It’s difficult to gain admissions to the schools where I’ve taught – Princeton, Georgetown, and now Notre Dame. Students at these institutions have done what has been demanded of them:  they are superb test-takers, they know exactly what is needed to get an A in every class (meaning that they rarely allow themselves to become passionate and invested in any one subject); they build superb resumes. They are respectful and cordial to their elders, though easy-going if crude with their peers. They respect diversity (without having the slightest clue what diversity is) and they are experts in the arts of non-judgmentalism (at least publically). They are the cream of their generation, the masters of the universe, a generation-in-waiting to run America and the world.

But ask them some basic questions about the civilization they will be inheriting, and be prepared for averted eyes and somewhat panicked looks. Who fought in the Peloponnesian War? Who taught Plato, and whom did Plato teach? How did Socrates die? Raise your hand if you have read both the Iliad and the Odyssey. The Canterbury Tales? Paradise Lost? The Inferno?

Who was Saul of Tarsus? What were the 95 theses, who wrote them, and what was their effect? Why does the Magna Carta matter? How and where did Thomas Becket die? Who was Guy Fawkes, and why is there a day named after him? What did Lincoln say in his Second Inaugural? His first Inaugural? How about his third Inaugural?  What are the Federalist Papers?

Some students, due most often to serendipitous class choices or a quirky old-fashioned teacher, might know a few of these answers. But most students have not been educated to know them. At best, they possess accidental knowledge, but otherwise are masters of systematic ignorance. It is not their “fault” for pervasive ignorance of western and American history, civilization, politics, art and literature. They have learned exactly what we have asked of them – to be like mayflies, alive by happenstance in a fleeting present.

Our students’ ignorance is not a failing of the educational system – it is its crowning achievement. Efforts by several generations of philosophers and reformers and public policy experts — whom our students (and most of us) know nothing about — have combined to produce a generation of know-nothings. The pervasive ignorance of our students is not a mere accident or unfortunate but correctible outcome, if only we hire better teachers or tweak the reading lists in high school. It is the consequence of a civilizational commitment to civilizational suicide. The end of history for our students signals the End of History for the West.

During my lifetime, lamentation over student ignorance has been sounded by the likes of E.D. Hirsch, Allan Bloom, Mark Bauerlein and Jay Leno, among many others. But these lamentations have been leavened with the hope that appeal to our and their better angels might reverse the trend (that’s an allusion to Lincoln’s first inaugural address, by the way). E.D. Hirsch even worked up a self-help curriculum, a do-it yourself guide on how to become culturally literate, imbued with the can-do American spirit that cultural defenestration could be reversed by a good reading list in the appendix. Broadly missing is sufficient appreciation that this ignorance is the intended consequence of our educational system, a sign of its robust health and success.

We have fallen into the bad and unquestioned habit of thinking that our educational system is broken, but it is working on all cylinders. What our educational system aims to produce is cultural amnesia, a wholesale lack of curiosity, history-less free agents, and educational goals composed of content-free processes and unexamined buzz-words like “critical thinking,” “diversity,” “ways of knowing,” “social justice,” and “cultural competence.”

Our students are the achievement of a systemic commitment to producing individuals without a past for whom the future is a foreign country, cultureless ciphers who can live anywhere and perform any kind of work without inquiring about its purposes or ends, perfected tools for an economic system that prizes “flexibility” (geographic, interpersonal, ethical).

In such a world, possessing a culture, a history, an inheritance, a commitment to a place and particular people, specific forms of gratitude and indebtedness (rather than a generalized and deracinated commitment to “social justice”), a strong set of ethical and moral norms that assert definite limits to what one ought and ought not to do (aside from being “judgmental”) are hindrances and handicaps.

Regardless of major or course of study, the main object of modern education is to sand off remnants of any cultural or historical specificity and identity that might still stick to our students, to make them perfect company men and women for a modern polity and economy that penalizes deep commitments. Efforts first to foster appreciation for “multi-culturalism” signaled a dedication to eviscerate any particular cultural inheritance, while the current fad of “diversity” signals thoroughgoing commitment to de-cultured and relentless homogenization.

We Must Know…What?

Above all, the one overarching lesson that students receive is the true end of education: the only essential knowledge is that know ourselves to be radically autonomous selves within a comprehensive global system with a common commitment to mutual indifference. Our commitment to mutual indifference is what binds us together as a global people. Any remnant of a common culture would interfere with this prime directive:  a common culture would imply that we share something thicker, an inheritance that we did not create, and a set of commitments that imply limits and particular devotions.

Ancient philosophy and practice praised as an excellent form of government a res publica – a devotion to public things, things we share together. We have instead created the world’s first Res Idiotica – from the Greek word idiotes, meaning “private individual.” Our education system produces solipsistic, self-contained selves whose only public commitment is an absence of commitment to a public, a common culture, a shared history. They are perfectly hollowed vessels, receptive and obedient, without any real obligations or devotions.

They won’t fight against anyone, because that’s not seemly, but they won’t fight for anyone or anything either. They are living in a perpetual Truman Show, a world constructed yesterday that is nothing more than a set for their solipsism, without any history or trajectory.

I love my students – like any human being, each has enormous potential and great gifts to bestow upon the world. But I weep for them, for what is rightfully theirs but hasn’t been given. On our best days, I discern their longing and anguish and I know that their innate human desire to know who they are, where they have come from, where they ought to go, and how they ought to live will always reassert itself. But even on those better days, I can’t help but hold the hopeful thought that the world they have inherited – a world without inheritance, without past, future, or deepest cares – is about to come tumbling down, and that this collapse would be the true beginning of a real education.

Read More At: MindingTheCampus.org


Patrick Deneen is David A. Potenziani Memorial Associate Professor of Constitutional Studies at Notre Dame.

Common Core Crisis [Part 1] – Time Waste

commomcore
TheBreakaway
Zy Marquiez
January 15, 2017

While researching many topics like Autism, Homeschooling, Public Schooling and others, have gotten to know myself a few more parents within the public schooling system.  These individuals and myself tend to talk about wide-ranging subjects, but usually end up focusing quite a bit on education, and schooling, which are not the same thing by the way.  Naturally, a conversation recently dovetailed into the worst of American Public Schooling Fooling – Common Core.

There are many people that have spoken out at length regarding common core, and am throwing my hat into this ring for what its worth.

An example of the ludicrousy that is Common Core follows.

After striking up a conversation with someone who teaches special needs kids privately and does ABA therapy, this person went on a rant with the intensity akin to a flamethrower.

She teaches 4 kids with one family, and one of the kids is getting a lesson in….

…wait for it…

…wait for it…

…..

INSTANT MESSAGING!  This is not a joke!  Oh, but it gets better.

This kid was being taught acronyms to foster ‘increased learning’ in the classroom.  SERIOUSLY!?

If you buy that one you believe babies deliver storks.  Let’s proceed.

Not only was the above the case, but this child had never even USED instant messaging, knew what it was, nor had used slang.  If am not mistaken, this child is around 7-8 years old.  Her parents tutor her privately, and she’s a rather bright kid.  She communicates with regular words [even the thought of having to say this hurts], and in full sentences [The audacity huh!].  She couldn’t wrap her head as to why anyone would start using incomplete words, sentences, and the like.

What became obvious was that, because she didn’t KNOW this ‘unknown language’, it was stalling her poor excuse for what passes for learning nowadays.   Every other line, a new acronym was placed, and she couldn’t’ understand that was being said.  HELL, my ADULT educator friend didn’t understand most of it either.  And yet, this is the notion that passes for education nowadays.

Have heard of dozens and dozens of other examples, ranging the full gamut.  Many are just as bad, and some far worse.

This was a new type of low though.  It’s as if they wish to fragment the mind into as many pieces as possible, and get these children focusing on everything but education.  For what it’s worth, they’re doing a bang-up job at it too![Click Here To See More]

No wonder public schooling keeps falling through the abyss ceaselessly. 

And at the rate its going, it seems there is no limit to how far the fall will continue.

If you’re a parent, you should really considering homeschooling or at minimum supplemental education with some private tutoring, even if it means tutoring yourself.

For if the system has its way, it will continue dumbing us down, as it has been for quite some time.