Who needs meds? Simple potassium may lower blood pressure more safely than prescription drugs

Image: Who needs meds? Simple potassium may lower blood pressure more safely than prescription drugs

Source:NaturalNews.com
Russel Davis
April 14, 2017

Eating foods high in potassium — such as fruits, vegetables, grains and roots — may help lower blood pressure levels, a recent analysis revealed. According to the review, higher dietary potassium intake was associated with significant reductions in blood pressure regardless of sodium intake. Data also show that high potassium consumption curbs blood pressure by using sodium to closely regulate potassium levels in the blood, which is crucial for normal heart, nerve and muscle function.

“Decreasing sodium intake is a well-established way to lower blood pressure. But evidence suggests that increasing dietary potassium may have an equally important effect on hypertension…When dietary potassium is high, kidneys excrete more salt and water, which increases potassium excretion. Eating a high potassium diet is like taking a diuretic,” said lead researcher Prof. Alicia McDonough, ScienceDaily.com reports. Prof. McDonough is a Professor of Cell and Neurobiology at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California.

However, the lead researcher cautioned that increasing dietary potassium intake may be challenging as our ancient ancestors evolved to crave sodium. Modern diets have also shown a drastic change, with food companies adding salt to satisfy this craving.”If you eat a typical Western diet. your sodium intake is high and your potassium intake is low. This significantly increases your chances of developing high blood pressure,” Prof. McDonough added.

The findings were published in the American Journal of Physiology — Endocrinology and Metabolism.

Dietary potassium vs. prescription drugs

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), high blood pressure or hypertension is the cause of 51 percent of stroke-related deaths and 45 percent of heart disease-related deaths worldwide. A vast number of studies have previously confirmed that dietary potassium may effectively regulate blood pressure levels. For instance, a 2015 study showed that higher dietary potassium levels helped maintain a healthy blood pressure level in girls throughout adolescence. “The beneficial effects of dietary potassium on both systolic and diastolic blood pressures suggest that consuming more potassium-rich foods during childhood may help suppress the adolescent increase in blood pressure,” the researchers wrote, JAMA Network.com reports. The results were published in JAMA Pedriatrics. 

A review published in the journal Hypertension also showed that dietary potassium may act as a diuretic and reduce extracellular fluid volume, which in turn may help lower blood pressure levels. The review also found that potassium can influence the activity of the renin-angiotensin system and decrease angiotensin markers on vascular, adrenal, or renal receptors. Researchers also found that dietary potassium helps reduce blood pressure levels by relaxing vascular smooth muscles and curbing peripheral vascular resistance.

In contrast, a 2010 study found that using antihypertensive drugs to lower blood pressure levels may do more harm than good. Researchers said various antihypertensive drugs were found to induce different adverse conditions. Thiazide diuretics were known to cause erectile dysfunction and severe hyponatremia, while angiotension-converting enzyme inhibitors were found to cause severe hypotension, neutropenia, and proteinuria. ACEs were also associated with the onset of renal failure, hyperkalemia and angioedema.

In addition, angiotension II receptor blockers were shown to cause abnormal liver function, lower hemoglobin levels, and renal impairment as well as pharyngitis, muscle cramp and myalgia. More serious side effects such as renovascular hypertension, cardiac failure, and cirrhosis were also associated with the drug. Beta-blockers were linked to diarrhea, bronchospam, hypotension, and altered glucose and lipid metabolism. This type of hypertensive was also associated with heart failure, heart block, abnormal vision, and erectile dysfunction. Calcium channel blockers were linked to pulmonary edema, peripheral edema and worse myocardial ischema. Other side effects associated with calcium channel blockers digital dysesthesia, nausea, and muscle cramps. The results were published in the International Journal of PharmTech Research.

Sources: 

ScienceDaily.com

UPI.com

JAMANetwork.com

NCBI.NLM.NIH.gov

Sphinxsai.com

iHealth News: Pet Studies & Child Health | Yoga | Nutrition & More

Source: iHealthTube.com
April 14, 2017

Can you eat your way to a healthy blood pressure? Find out what foods can help. Also learn about the benefits of having a pet for your infant and what benefits yoga is now showing for a certain group of men!

Off grid living: Grow 25 pounds of sweet potatoes in a bucket

Image: Off grid living: Grow 25 pounds of sweet potatoes in a bucket
Source: NaturalNews.com
Amy Goodrich
March 5, 2017

Although sweet potatoes are an important staple food for Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners, this versatile, orange root tuber can be added to many other meals all year round. While sweet potatoes have been used for ages by many cultures around the world, until recently they weren’t a regular sight on American kitchen tables outside of the Holiday season.

In the past decade, however, the sweet potato has found its way to our hearts. According to the Agricultural Marketing Resource Center, the root vegetable’s popularity has skyrocketed between 2000 and 2014, with its consumption increasing by nearly 80 percent. And for a good reason; sweet potatoes pack a powerful nutritional punch.

They are loaded with essential micronutrients to promote overall health and have fewer calories than ordinary potatoes. Essential nutrients found in sweet potatoes include fiber, protein, beta-carotene, vitamin C, manganese, potassium, and many vitamins of the B-complex.

What’s more, you actually don’t need a big garden or a lot of space to grow your own supply of sweet potatoes. Read on to find out how to grow sweet potatoes at your home.

Easy steps to grow sweet potatoes in a bucket

  1. Select the right sweet potato – Rooted sweet potatoes will give you the best result since you can be sure that they are not treated with pesticides to stop the sprouting process.
  2. Create some heat – Unlike regular potatoes, sweet potatoes love the heat. While sweet potatoes will still grow at a minimum temperature of 50 °F (10°C), they seem to do much better at room temperature. So, if you live in a colder climate, make sure to keep them indoors.
  3. Prepare a 5-gallon bucket – Once you have selected the right sprouted potato, fill a container that has draining holes in the bottom with moist soil. Plant one potato per 5-gallon bucket, tops exposed.
  4. Waiting for “slips” to emerge – After a while, green shoots or slips will start to grow out of the sweet potato. This step will take about 90 days.
  5. Transplant the slips – Once the slips are big enough, about 6 to 12 inches, it is time to gently remove them from the sweet potato and transplant them to a larger 20-gallon container. In each 20-gallon container, you can plant six sweet potato slips.
  6. Pick the right season – As mentioned before, sweet potatoes are a heat-loving plant. If you are planning to grown them outdoors, make sure the last frost of spring has already passed. Late spring is the ideal time of the year. Also, make sure they stay well-watered.
  7. Harvest time – After about 3 to 4 months – or when the leaves and vines start to turn yellow – you can start digging up the sweet potatoes. If you grow outdoors, this is usually just after the first frost. After digging up the sweet potatoes, shake off any excess dirt, but do not wash them with water as sweet potatoes need a curing process to create their delicious, sweet taste.
  8. Cure sweet potatoes – Next to enhancing their flavor, curing allows a second skin to form over scratches and bruises you made while digging up the potatoes. This protective layer makes it possible to store sweet potatoes at room temperature for up to a year. To cure, store the harvested tubers in a warm, humid place (80°F or 27°C) for two weeks.

As reported by Off The Grid News, bucket-grown sweet potatoes will have a yield of about 25 pounds for each 20-gallon container. (RELATED: Find more information about off-the-grid living at OffGrid.news.)

Read More At: NaturalNews.com

Sources:

TrueActivist.com

AGMRC.org

WHFoods.com

Almanac.com

FDA’s Latest Nutrition Label ‘Make Over’ Warns Consumers About Toxic Calorie Counts While Ignoring Noxious Genetically Modified Food & Toxic Chemical Additive

FDA
Source: NaturalNews.com
S.D. Wells
June 10, 2016

When will the government of the United States of America ever actually help Americans get healthy, and duly inform consumers about all food ingredients by utilizing honest food labels instead of using trickery and deception? Every year, the FDA and the USDA approve more and more food toxins, while covering up the health detriment they cause, all while leading people down a dark corridor of poor health.

Does it really matter if you “count calories” if all those calories are empty ones, devoid of all nutrition? Will it be helpful to limit or eliminate your “fat” intake, if you only limit or eliminate all the good fats – the kind your body needs to function properly? Did your MD bother to educate you about the difference between good fats and molecularly-altered “bad” fats? Labels were first focused on how much fat you eat, but since the FDA doesn’t educate anyone on bad fat versus good fat, it never mattered.

What if you get excited about some new labels on food because you’re supposed to watch your cholesterol, only to find out that you need cholesterol and your medical doctor and the labels steered you completely wrong? And then there’s sugar – the sugar that comes from genetically modified corn, highly concentrated (HFCS) which contains bug-killer and weed-killer that leads directly to cancer and diabetes. What difference does it really make if you “moderate” your poison intake? It’s still poison. Will you brag to your friends that you’re regulating and “reducing” your own poison intake because some new food labels are helping you?

The Associated Press recently published this new food label update: BigStory.AP.org

More ‘Big Food’ propaganda disguised as food label modifications

The FDA is actually announcing that serving sizes will be “less misleading.” How about not misleading at all? What if someone told you they would be less abusive to you – would you be excited about that? The size of the “calories” number will be much bigger and bolder. Now we are to “count calories” more easily, as if it matters whether you eat the whole can of toxic chili or half, or whether you eat six donuts or four, or you chomp down half the sack of hydrogenated-GM-oil-soaked chips or the whole bag.

Labels will give a new “percent daily value” for sugars, letting you know how much sugar is recommended for your “daily intake.” This is supposed to influence food manufacturers to put in less sugar at the factory. Does that mean they will simply insert more of those deadly chemical sweeteners in order to compensate for America’s sweet tooth, like aspartame, sucralose, sorbitol, saccharine and acesulfame potassium?

Basically each whole package of food will be a serving, so obese people feel less obese, and diabetics may feel less diabetic. No more guilt for eating that party-size bag of chips. That’s just one serving! Wait, you ate a whole box of cookies and drank a half-gallon of conventional milk? No problem. That was just a single serving.

The FDA is saying that, by law, serving sizes should be based on actual consumption habits and not ideal consumption, and since more than a third of Americans are obese, and half of the rest are overweight, that “Big Gulp” at 7/11 will become one serving. Are two double cheeseburgers and some super-sized fries just one helping? What’s next, a two-liter bottle of diet soda becoming one serving? Hey, look, no calories!

Continue Reading At: NaturalNews.com