Top 10 antioxidant-rich foods you need to add to your diet

Image: Top 10 antioxidant-rich foods you need to add to your diet

Source: NaturalNews.com
Russel Davis
May 4, 2017

Antioxidants promote a healthier body by eradicating free radicals, which can weaken the immune system and lead to a variety of diseases. An article in Medium.com states that food is the primary source of essential antioxidants. Certain food groups such as berries, nuts, and leafy greens are touted for their high antioxidant content.

Below is a list of the top 10 foods with the highest antioxidant content.

  1. Berries – Berries are excellent sources of polyphenols, micronutrients, and fiber. Various studies have already established that consuming berries, whether fresh, freeze-dried, or juiced, provide superior protection against heart diseases and certain types of cancers. Blueberries are especially recognized for having the highest antioxidant levels among berries. Other sources of antioxidants include strawberries, cranberries, raspberries, and goji berries.
  2. Green tea – Green tea has been cultivated for centuries because of their high antioxidant properties that help prevent the onset of certain cancers including breast, pancreatic, colorectal, and lung cancer. Green tea is also known to reduce the risk of inflammatory diseases such as diabetes, liver disease, and inflammatory bowel disease.
  3. Leafy greens – Leafy green vegetables such as spinach and kale contain essential phytochemicals that counter the effects of inflammation and carcinogens.
  4. Pomegranates, cherries, grapes, and raisins – Grapes are best known for their high polyphenol content, which is essential in keeping certain types of cancers in check. The high antioxidant levels in grapes and raisins were also tied to lower risk of heart disease, hypertension, diabetes, and diabetes-related complications. Pomegranates and cherries are also known to contain high antioxidant levels.
  5. Dark chocolate – Dark chocolate is rich in the antioxidant flavonoids. In fact, just one oz. of dark chocolate contains twice as much antioxidants as red wine.
  6. Plums and prunes – Both plums and prunes are regarded as superfoods for their high antioxidant content. According to recent studies, one plum contains as much antioxidants as a handful of blueberries.
  7. Nuts – Nuts are an excellent source of antioxidants called polyphenols. A recent study presented at the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society revealed that walnuts contain twice as much antioxidants as those found in other nuts such as pecans, macadamias, cashews, and pistachios.
  8. Ground cloves – Spices such as ground cloves are not only packed with flavor, they are found to have very high antioxidant content. Other antioxidant-rich spices include turmeric, garlic, ginger as well as cinnamon and oregano.
  9. Kidney beans – Kidney beans have been a kitchen staple for years. These humble legumes contain high amounts of antioxidants.
  10. Artichoke hearts – Artichoke hearts are also found to contain high levels of essential antioxidants.

The research community has long established that antioxidants are essential in maintaining a healthy body. These compounds help protect the body from the harmful effects of free radicals. Free radicals are unstable body molecules that lack electrons. These molecules steal electrons from the nearest healthy cell, which in turn makes the cell sick and prompts a chain reaction within the body. Free radical formation can be caused by exposure to toxins and pollution, smoking, and other environmental factors.

An article in the GlobalHealingCenter.com likens this process to cleaning a fish a tank. The fish tank resembles the body, while the gunk and grime that form in it at are the free radicals. Antioxidants act as bottom-feeder fishes that suck up all the dirt in the tank. In the same manner, antioxidants scavenge the body for free radicals and eliminate them by slowing down or inhibiting the body’s oxidation process. High antioxidant levels in the body may help keep certain diseases in check such as cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Antioxidants were also associated with improved eye health, immune system and slower aging process.

Learn more about plant nutrients at Nutrients.news.

Read More At: NaturalNews.com

Sources include:

Medium.com

GlobalHealingCenter.com

Blog.FoodNetwork.com

UMM.edu

Prevention.com

MedicalNewsToday.com

NBCNews.com

DailyMail.co.uk

Top 14 Fall Superfoods You Can Try

Source: Mercola
Dr. Mercola
September 16, 2016

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/cur… Brussels sprouts, apples, sweet potatoes, pomegranates, turnips, and pumpkins are some of the top fall superfoods you can try.

Why are purple foods so good for you? Learn the science of why these pigmented choices are good for heart, brain health

Purple foods
Source: NaturalNews.com
David Gutierrez
April 19, 2016

You’ve probably heard that purple foods — from blueberries to purple versions of foods such as potatoes — are particularly good for your health, and you may have wondered what’s behind this effect. In fact, it literally is the purple color itself that’s good for you — the pigments that give foods their purple color are a family of potent antioxidants known as anthocyanins.

Studies have linked anthocyanins to lowered risk of cancer, cardiovascular disease, neurological disease, cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease. They also appear to help control — and possibly prevent — obesity and diabetes, in part by inhibiting certain digestive enzymes and helping control levels of blood sugar. They are potent anti-inflammatories, and are therefore also likely to reduce the risk of most chronic diseases.

Think “purple”

So how can you boost your intake of these super-antioxidants? Primarily by eating deep red, blue and purple fruits and vegetables. This includes all berries, including strawberries, as well as other fruits including cherries, pomegranates and plums.

Some vegetables are only high in anthocyanins if you pick the variety with the right color: purple sweet potatoes, red onions and purple cabbage, for example. Other high-anthocyanin vegetables include beets and eggplant. In the case of eggplant, be sure not to throw away the skin, as that’s where most of the anthocyanins reside. The skin is also high in fiber, potassium and magnesium.

The skins of red and purple grapes are of course a good source of anthocyanins, which also makes red wine a good source of this antioxidant. Along with resveratrol (another powerful antioxidant), anthocyanins may be responsible for many of the remarkable health benefits of red wine.

All of the above are foods that are relatively easy to come by. But if you’re in the mood for something that’s less common in the US diet, there are some other anthocyanin-rich foods you can try. One of these is guava fruit, and particularly the blue-green peels. Another is black rice, or, if that’s too expensive, Kerala Red rice. Both of these are natural varieties of rice — not to be confused with genetically modified “Golden Rice.”

Continue Reading At: NaturalNews.com