9 Financial Risks Of Doing Business With Monsanto

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Source: NaturalSociety.com
Christina Sarich
June 9, 2016

An agricultural, biotech giant, Monsanto has become ‘more vulnerable than ever,’ largely due to having an unnaturally-intense poor public image. In recent times, the company has seen successive stock drops and weaker sales of its biotech-created corn and the best-selling herbicide, Roundup. The company had to report falling profits again and again, slashing jobs.

One Huffington Post writer says that Monsanto is “notorious for being litigious, secretive and combative with critics who question its products or seemingly unscrupulous practices.” The company has been shown to be a bad investment for those who were counting on huge profits from one of the biggest players in the industry.

Now, without ignoring the fact that Monsanto is one of the biggest companies around, raking in literally billions of dollars from sales every year, I’ve outlined 9 reasons to stay away from Monsanto if you don’t want to ‘lose your shirt.’

1. A Potential Cancer-Connection

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The World Health Organization’s cancer research agency has published a full report on glyphosate, the main ingredient in Monsanto’s best-selling herbicide, and called it “a probable human carcinogen.” Since that announcement in March 2015, several countries, cities, and retail chains worldwide have banned or severely limited the use of glyphosate products. As of October 2015, at least 700 personal injury non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma lawsuits were pending against Monsanto. More are publicized every day.

However, it isn’t conclusive even in the scientific community that glyphosate is cancer-causing. In fact, other organizations claim that it is unlikely to cause cancer

A joint committee of experts from the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization and the World Health Organization said:

“In view of the absence of carcinogenic potential in rodents at human-relevant doses and the absence of genotoxicity by the oral route in mammals, and considering the epidemiological evidence from occupational exposures, the meeting concluded that glyphosate is unlikely to pose a carcinogenic risk to humans from exposure through the diet.”

The real problem for Monsanto, though, is that their product is still perceived by the public (at the very least) to be toxic and harmful.

2. Liability will be Ongoing…for Decades

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Monsanto’s liability for making glyphosate may persist long into the future. The herbicide can be detected for decades in many types of soil, and GMO contamination self-propagates in the gene pool and cannot be fully eradicated. Glyphosate has also been found in human blood, urine, and breast milk.

3. Monsanto Legally Fighting PCB Contamination

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Monsanto is not only being sued for glyphosate’s toxicity, but also for the creation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) since 1976. PCB pollution has caused almost every waterway in the US to be compromised, harming marine life and surrounding ecosystems. A rash of lawsuits against Monsanto has arisen and there will likely be more.

Most recently, St. Louis Circuit Court awarded $17.5 million in damages to the three plaintiffs and assessed an additional $29 million in punitive damages against Monsanto, Solutia, Pharmacia and Pfizer, the St. Louis Dispatch reported.

4. Roundup Sales are Dropping

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Reports indicate that sales of Roundup are dropping, and so are sales of Roundup-ready crops. GE corn, soy, and cotton developed by Monsanto to withstand copious spraying of the herbicide constitute 90 percent of their revenue.

As more people catch wind of the scientific evidence proving that these crops have significant health impacts on humans, then Monsanto will likely continue to lose profits. Farmers are also realizing that Monsanto’s promises about these crops may have been empty. They’ve had to deal with super weeds and super bugs like never before.

5. Organic Crops Surpassing GMO Crops

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Farmers are seeing evidence of GM crop failure not just by growing the patented seeds, but also in their livestock, that is, according to Non-GMO report. Numerous farmers who switch to non-GMO feed report improved livestock health and increased profits. If these claims are continually validated, Monsanto may lose its largest GMO market and perhaps become liable for cumulative losses from an entire industry.

6. GMOs are Creating Superbugs and Superweeds

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Super bugs and super weeds linked to Monsanto’s Roundup Ready and Bt crops are taking over agricultural lands across the world. More than 300 million acres worldwide are suffering from these secondary causes of planting Monsanto’s GM seed. As insects are developing resistance to Roundup, Monsanto and other companies are developing and marketing even more chemicals to people who are growing weary of this agricultural paradigm.

7. People Don’t Want GMOs, or at LEAST Support GMO Labeling

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Both European and American food makers are ditching GMOs due to consumer demand. One poll found that 80% of respondents considered non-GM food healthier and would pay more for organic, non-GM food. Sales of non-GM food have already grown to more than $10 billion and are expected to keep climbing. Can Monsanto continue to stay financially viable in a world that doesn’t want their products?

8. Politics will Change. Whistleblowing will Happen.

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For example, the FDA Deputy Commissioner for Foods Michael Taylor was a former Vice President for Public Policy at Monsanto, and current USDA Secretary Tom Vilsack was chair of the Governors Biotechnology Partnership and was named Governor of the Year by the Biotechnology Industry Organization.

Politics change. People tell the truth eventually.

9. Monsanto is Heavily Disliked by the General Public

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Monsanto has actually been called one of the ‘most hated companies in the world.’ Millions have marched against them, and many say they have been bullied by them in court. When a company obtains a reputation to falsely influence science, there will be negative presence. Any company with this kind of public reputation will undoubtedly face some hurdles.

As Benjamin Franklin once said, “it takes many good deeds to build a good reputation, and only one bad one to lose it.”

Read More At: NaturalSociety.com

Study: Monsanto’s PCBs Causing ‘Severe Impact’ on Whales and Dolphins

Despite The Chemicals Being Banned For Decades

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Source: NaturalSociety.com
Christina Sarich
April 14, 2016

It has been highly reported that biotechnology company Monsanto made attempts to hide the true impact that toxic polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have on the environment, which has led numerous cities to file lawsuits against the company. Now, new research has surfaced on the true effects behind Monsanto’s PCBs and their impact on wildlife.

The PCBs have been putting European killer whales and bottlenose striped dolphins at risk.

Continue Reading At: NaturalSociety.com

A recently-released study says that the PCB-contamination of the dolphin and whale’s habitats have caused entire populations to suffer. The exposure to PCBs is causing them to become reproductively-stagnate. In other words, the chemicals are causing reproductive impairment. Some scientists warn that some of these animals could experience serious damage if something isn’t done. A pod of killer whales off the coast of the UK has dwindled to just 8 individuals and has reportedly not given birth to a calf since 1992.

Is Monsanto Seriously Exempt from ALL Liability Lawsuits for PCB Contamination?

Chemical Safety Bill Adds Dirty Protection

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Source: NaturalSociety.com
Christina Sarich
March 2, 2016

Absolute power corrupts absolutely.” – Lord Acton, 1887

Monsanto says it has nothing to do with the clause that our corrupt Congress just passed in a piece of legislation exempting the St. Louis-based company from ALL financial liability involved with lawsuits and financial settlements related to PCB contamination and cleanup sites. REALLY? [1]

We’re supposed to assume that a company responsible for almost 1.25 billion pounds of carcinogenic PCBs, or polychlorinated biphenyls, sold in the US between the 1930’s and 1970’s had absolutely nothing to do with a provision giving Monsanto a free pass for polluting the waterways, fields, and air. The EPA even admits that these chemicals are carcinogenic and harmful to reproductive health, the immune system, the endocrine system, and the nervous system?

Just because Monsanto switched its focus from polluting the world with PCBs to polluting it with Round Up and Round Up ready crops, the mega-corp is absolved from taking an ounce of responsibility?

Monsanto already agreed to pay $700 million to a city in Alabama to clean up PCB contamination, but with a host of new cities suing for the same reason – did Monsanto just turn Congress onto a new level of corruption in order to protect itself from further culpability?

The provision was slipped into another bill regarding chemical safety introduced last year by an unknown representative, and though it doesn’t name Monsanto specifically, it has the company’s name written all over it. The provision would benefit the only manufacturer in the United States of now-banned PCBs, a mainstay of Monsanto business model for decades. [1]

The House and the Senate last year both passed versions of legislation to replace the 40-year-old Toxic Substances Control Act, a law that the Environmental Protection Agency acknowledged had become so unworkable that as many as 1,000 hazardous chemicals still on sale today needed to be evaluated to see if they should be banned or restricted. But instead of protecting Americans from further chemical exposure, it just renegotiated Monsanto’s past misdeeds into a disappearing pit of corporate escapism.

Continue Reading At: NaturalSociety.com

Breaking: Seattle Joins Major US Cities to Sue Monsanto for Toxic PCB Contamination

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Source: NaturalSociety.com
Christina Sarich
January 28, 2016

The city of Seattle now adds its name to 5 other major US cities that are suing Monsanto over PCBs. Perhaps a tide of similar legal action will finally break Monsanto for good. [1]

Activists may have a tough time shutting down Monsanto for poisoning the planet with GM foods and engaging in the corrupt chemical whirl-go-round that seems to be ruining every conceivable aspect of the natural world, but Monsanto’s karma is catching up, and quick.

Though most of us know Monsanto for creating the best-selling herbicide Round Up and contributing to the creation of Agent Orange, in this case, PCB contamination is targeted in 20,000 acres that drain to the Lower Duwamish, a federal Superfund site in Seattle, Washington.

Monsanto was a producer of PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) for commercial use in the U.S. from 1935 to 1977. The company has made millions from selling PCBs, all the while knowing that natural environments were suffering, causing harm to people, wildlife, and pets.

A majority of the people who worked for Monsanto in their PCB-making ‘glory days’ had little clue what the chemicals were doing to them. Most never thought to connect Monsanto to some of the odder features of life in places such as Anniston, Alabama – where the creek (known locally as “the ditch”) passed through town carrying water that ran red some days, purple on others, and occasionally emitted a foggy white steam.

Seattle City Attorney Pete Holmes got the idea of filing the lawsuit in Seattle from other cities which have already done the same. Jose, Oakland, Berkeley, San Diego, and Spokane have already set up legal proceedings against Monsanto.

“When the profit motive overtakes concern for the environment, this is the kind of disaster that happens,” Holmes said. “I’m proud to hold Monsanto accountable.”

An untold amount of PCBs have contaminated Seattle’s waterways in the last few decades. Resident fish and shellfish in the Lower Duwamish Waterway are so contaminated by PCBs that the state Health Department advises there is no safe amount to eat — though people continue to fish from its waters.

Continue Reading At: NaturalSociety.com

Huge: Berkeley, CA Joins in Suing Monsanto for Toxic PCB Chemical Pollution

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Source: NaturalSociety.com
Christina Sarich
January 11, 2016

Through a unanimous vote by its City Council, the city of Berkeley, California has decided to hold Monsanto legally liable for polluting the land and water with PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls). [1]

The council’s 6-0 vote means that Berkeley is joining Oakland, San Jose, San Diego and Spokane, Washington, in filing suits against Monsanto, the agricultural biotech company based in St. Louis, Missouri.

The news comes near the company’s announcement of cutting a total of 3,600 jobs due to declining sales.

PCB’s were first manufactured commercially in 1929 by the Swann Corporation, which later became part of Monsanto Chemical Company. By 1976, the environmental destruction caused by PCBs was so obvious that even Congress had to outlaw them.

However, even after the U.S. banned PCBs, world production continued at 36 million pounds per year from 1980-1984 and 22 million pounds per year from 1984- 1989. The end of PCB production is still not in sight, and the long-term effects linger in some of the most conspicuous ways.

The San Francisco Bay has been found to be replete with toxic PCBs, causing damage to fish and other marine life.

According to the NRDC:

“In 1997, 50 percent of fish sampled in San Francisco Bay exceeded screening values for PCBs and mercury. (A screening value is the tolerable level of a particular contaminant, as determined by the state.) White croaker and shiner surf perch showed high concentrations of PCBs and pesticides, while striped bass and leopard sharks were found to have high levels of mercury.

In the same year, 15 percent to 37 percent of samples exceeded the screening values for DDT and chlordane. Fish in Oakland Harbor had significantly higher contamination concentrations than the fish in other areas of the bay. In a number of cases, the level of contamination was well above state and federal health standards.”

These contamination levels still linger today. The kicker is that Monsanto has been accused of knowingly contaminating California’s waters with the chemicals.

Continue Reading At: NaturalSociety.com