The Healing Power of Tualang Honey

image-tualang_honey-735-350
Source: NaturalSociety.com
July Fidler
July 22, 2016

Have you ever heard of Tualang honey? It’s a kind of honey that surpasses any honey you’d find in the grocery store, offering a plethora of health benefits.  Tualang honey is like delectable medicine.

I don’t know about you, but I never met a honey I didn’t love. Now, I know you’re supposed to limit your sugar intake, but honey is a deliciously sticky sweetener that actually comes with some health perks. But some honeys have more health benefits than others, of course. Not all honeys are created equal.

Tualang Honey is Risky Business

A highly prized healing potion in Malaysia, Tualang honey is a rare honey named for the trees in the rainforest from which it comes. It must be good, because people put their lives on the line to harvest it.

The bee that makes this type of honey builds its nests in the branches of tall Tualang trees measuring as high as 289 feet tall.

When the Malaysian rainforest blooms in spring, Asian honey bees, or Rock bees – Apis dorsata – make large, parabolic-shaped honey combs which hang from the high limbs of the Tualang trees. These bees are the largest honey bees in the world, and are about twice the size of the European honey bees you see in the United States.

During spring, a single Tualang tree can hold up to 100 hives, containing a combined weight of up to 992 pounds of honey.

When it’s time to harvest the honey, brave honey-hunters fashion smoke torches made out of dried coconut husk fiber wrapped in wide, green leaves. Then, they climb the trees using ropes and hand-holds. Usually, 1 hunter will climb while a ground crew of 2 or more collects the buckets of honey that are sent down to the ground attached to ropes.

asianhoney
Source: Malaysia’s Wild Honey

Read: The Many Health Benefits of Honey

Once up in the tree, the honey-hunter smokes the bees and takes much of the hive. Tualang honey hunters are typically pock-marked with bee sting scars. [1]

These giant honey bees are known to be quite aggressive. [2]

Since honey-hunters go deep into the rainforest and risk life and limb warding off massive bees at treetop level, Tualang honey ain’t cheap. The least inexpensive jar I could find online was $17.51 for 424 grams. One site was selling a jar of it for $90!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yw1XfpvCnQY

Why on Earth Would you Spend that Kind of Money on Honey?

Did I mention Tualang honey comes from the rainforest? That means it comes from the nectars of many rainforest plants. Enormous medical breakthroughs have had their roots in the rainforest, no pun intended.

An extensive analysis of the honey found that it contains a concentration of antioxidants, anti-inflammatory agents, antibacterial compounds, and other phytochemicals known to fight tumor growth and support cardiovascular health. [1]

Read: Yes, Honey IS Far Superior to Sugar

In fact, research published in the journal Toxicological & Environmental Chemistry found that Tualang honey can be “used as a supplement among those who are exposed to free radicals in cigarette smoke either as active or passive smokers in order to protect or reduce the risk of having cardiovascular disease.” [3]

Tualang honey has also found to be comparable to the chemotherapy drug Tamoxifen for treating breast cancer.

In Malaysia, people use Tualang honey as a daily health tonic by mixing a teaspoon of it in a couple ounces of water. [1]

It is also used as a topical aid used by native people to heal wounds, and to kill bacteria in skin infections.

Tualang honey is great for relieving a sore throat and soothing cold symptoms. A modest amount has even been shown to stabilize blood sugar and lower blood pressure.

Where to Find it

Tualang honey is best found online; however, some stores specializing in Southeast Asian food products may also carry it.

Read More At: NaturalNews.com

Invisible Microparticles In Food Can Deliver Vaccines, Drugs

I compare a patent application with what at least one company can deliver to the unknowing public now.

QuestionEverything
NoMoreFakeNews.com
Jon Rappoport
June 12, 2016

Thanks to researcher Mary Baker for showing me an explosive patent application and its implications.

Before getting to the details, the overview is this: a technology exists to embed tiny invisible particles in food products, and these particles can deliver nutrients and drugs and vaccines. Apparently, the technology has existed for at least 10 years. Yet, as Baker states, when have you seen a food label that mentions such particles?

Are we to assume the technology hasn’t yet been applied? Is it operating at a stealth level? I’ll try to answer these questions in a minute. But first:

US Patent application ‘US20080044481 A1’. “Microparticles for oral delivery.” May 27, 2005. The inventor and assignee is listed as Mordechai Harel, who was associated with Advanced BioNutrition Corporation of Columbia, Maryland. Here are a group of quotes from the patent application. The statements leave no doubt about the wide, wide application of the technology.

“The particles described herein can be used to deliver bioactive agents (e.g., nutrients, drugs, vaccines, antibodies, and the like), bacteria (e.g., probiotic bacteria), smaller particles, or substantially any other material to the animal.”

“The particles described herein can be prepared and used as free-flowing dry powders, slurries, suspensions, and the like, and are useful for delivering to an animal a drug, a pesticide, a nutrient, a vaccine, a smaller particle, or substantially any other composition that can be contained in the particles. The particles are thus suitable for use in human food products, animal feeds (e.g., pet foods and farmed animal diets), therapeutic compositions (e.g., drugs), prophylactic compositions (e.g., vaccines, antibiotics, and probiotic bacterial preparations), and pest control products among other products.”

“A ‘particle’ is a discrete piece of a (homogeneous or heterogeneous) material having a maximum dimension not greater than 5000 micrometers.”

“Furthermore, when the microparticles are to be used as components of a food product, it can be desirable that the microparticles are not visible.”

“The particles described herein can be used to deliver substantially any chemical species, combination of chemicals, cell, or other piece of matter that can be incorporated into the particle to a component of an animal. All such items are referred to herein as ‘bioactive’ compositions, regardless of what the utility of the composition is. Bioactive compositions include, for example, pharmaceutical compositions or compounds, nutraceutical compositions or compounds, nutritional components, probiotic bacteria, bacteriophages, viruses, flavorants, fragrances, detergents or other surface-active compositions.”

“Examples of these [deliverable micro] agents include antibiotics, analgesics, vaccines, anti-inflammatory agents, antidepressants, anti-viral agents, anti-tumor agents, enzyme inhibitors, formulations containing zidovudine, proteins or peptides (such as vaccines, antibodies, antimicrobial peptides), enzymes, (e.g., amylases, proteases, lipases, pectinases, cellulases, hemicellulases, pentosanases, xylanases, and phytases), liposomes, aromatic nitro and nitroso compounds and their metabolites, HIV protease inhibitors, viruses, and steroids, hormones or other growth stimulating agents, pesticides, herbicides, germicides, biocides, algicides, rodenticides, fungicides, insecticides, antioxidants, plant and animal growth promoters, plant and animal growth inhibitors, preservatives, nutraceuticals, disinfectants, sterilization agents, catalysts, chemical reactants, fermentation agents, foods, animal feeds, food or animal feed supplements, nutrients, flavors, colors, dyes, cosmetics, drugs, vitamins, sex sterilants, fertility inhibitors, fertility promoters, air purifiers, microorganism attenuators, nucleic acids (e.g., RNA, DNA, PNA, vectors, plasmids, ribozymes, aptamers, dendrimers, and the like), antioxidants, phytochemicals, hormones, vitamins (such as vitamins A, B1, B2, B6, B12; C, D, E, and K, pantothenate, and folic acid), pro-vitamins, carotenoids, minerals (such as calcium, selenium, magnesium salts, available iron, and iron salts), microorganisms (such as bacteria, such as probiotics, lactobacilli, fungi, and yeast), prebiotics, trace elements, essential and/or highly unsaturated fatty acids (such as omega-3 fatty acids, and mid-chain triglycerides), nutritional supplements, enzymes (such as amylases, proteases, lipases, pectinases, cellulases, hemicellulases, pentosanases, xylanases, and phytases), pigments, amino acids, agriculturally useful compositions to either prevent infestation (such as herbicides, pesticides, insecticides, rodenticides, fungicides, mixtures thereof) or to promote growth (such as hormones, fertilizers, or other growth stimulating agents), flavorants, and fragrances.”

I’d say that’s a wide range of application, wouldn’t you?

Did you notice, among the blizzard of compounds deliverable through invisible microparticles, the drug called zidovudine? That’s AZT, a chemo medicine used to treat AIDS patients. To say AZT is toxic would be a vast understatement. It destroys the ability of cells to replicate. And back in 2005, it was mentioned as a drug that can be delivered in food.

So is this technology being applied? Do we, in fact, have these microparticles and their bioactive components in our food?

Let’s go back to the 2005 patent application. As I mentioned, the inventor, Mordechai Harel, was associated with a company, Advanced BioNutrition Corporation. On the company’s website, we find a link to a scientific paper co-authored by Roger Drewes, who became the company’s chief science officer in 2010 (“A novel targeted delivery technology for protecting sensitive bioactive compounds…”). This is an interesting paper. Here is some of the language in the paper. Does any of it remind you of quotes from the 2005 patent application? The paper mentions a novel and proprietary “delivery technology,” MicroMax, which “protect[s] sensitive bioactive compounds through food manufacturing processes.” Also mentioned: a “formulation containing natural polymers surrounding the probiotic bacteria or other biologically active materials…” The probiotic bacteria “remain quiescent while retaining their activity for a long period of time under challenging…gastric conditions…[MicroMax was tested using] bacteria, essential oils, vitamins, enzymes, pigments, and even vaccines in a variety of food and feed products…and the microparticles were sieved to deliver the desired particle range…” [emphasis added]

Continue Reading At: JonRappoport.wordpress.com
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Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free NoMoreFakeNews emails here or his free OutsideTheRealityMachine emails here.