March Book Haul 2017

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TheBreakaway | BreakawayConciousness
Zy Marquiez
April 6, 2017

This month there were some serendipitous finds within the realm of books and reading that help feed the addict’s voracious hunger.  The topics are wide in scope as they are intriguing, and have made for some thought-provoking reading when I’ve had the time.

#1: The Nuclear Axis: Secret Collaboration Between West Germany & South Africa by Zdenek Cervenka & Barbara Rogers

The title says it all. This book details the connection between West Germany and South Africa, which is actually more disturbing than at first blush.  The book also delineates which other countries were involved in this fiasco besides South Africa, and shows that Germany, who went on record never to create nuclear weapons post World War 2, became in fact a de-facto nuclear power.  Then again, it shouldn’t be shocking considering that Germany’s attempted world domination in three previous instances.

#2:  Striking Thoughts: Bruce Lee’s Wisdom For Daily Living by Bruce Lee

Knowing that Bruce Lee is the epitome of Individuality, reading about him has been something that I’ve wanted to do for quite some time.

This book has been an inspiring read.  Due to its format, the book can be read straight through, or just broken up into small pieces given that it’s not a book which builds on itself like most non-fiction books.  For me the latter method has worked better.

Usually just slice off a few pages on a daily basis as the aphorisms give one much to ponder about in unexpected ways.  Granted, some of the aphorisms are fairly straight forward, but there’s plenty of insights to be had if one remains open minded.

#3Culture As History: The Transformation Of American Society In The Twentieth Century by Historian Warren Susman

Wishing to learn more about the change culture American culture has gone through, this book felt like a natural pick considering it was mentioned in Susan Cain’s Quiet – The Power Of Introverts In A World That Can’t Stop Talking.  In Quiet, Cain mentions how in her book Culture As History historian Susman covers the transition between the culture of character to a culture of personality.  Seeing the results of this change in modern times, thought it prudent to go back in time and see where society began changing.  Predictably, there was serious social engineering and propaganda taking place to bring this about.   I am definitely looking forward to research this topic further down the line.

#4:  The War Of Art: Break Through The Blocks & Win Your Inner Creative Battles  Steven Pressfield

This book barely became known to me a few weeks ago.  Being the book-addict that I am, initially, I told myself not to purchase this or any other book for that matter until catching up on some reading, but after about a week of pondering, I just couldn’t resist.  This merits a shout out to all bodacious bloggers that feed that addiction!  [If you got time and want to check out another fellow wordpress blogger on all things writing, click this link to check out Calliope Writing]

This book is like the Art Of War but doused with much inspiration and creativity.  If there’s even one cell of creativity within you, ruminate upon getting this book.

#5:  Speed: Facing Our Addiction To Fast & Faster – And Overcoming Our Fear Of Slowing Down by Dr. Stephanie Brown Ph.D.

This book covers society’s addiction to living at the vanguard at Warp 9.  This book brings about quite a few different concerns, especially considering that a sizeable portion of society follows the actions noted in this book to a tee, particularly the younger generations.  If you have young ones or know of anybody that might be plugged in to the matrix 24/7 so to speak, considering having them get this book.  There’s a review of it here.

#6:  UFOs for the 21st Century Mind by Richard Dolan

If you’ve ever wondered about where to start regarding the abstruse subjects of UFOs, START HERE.  Even if you have, this book still offers a lot of value given the severity of the subject.  Having read dozens of books on this subject, many books usually end up leaving the reader wanting more.  Additionally, there really isn’t anything as comprehensive and detailed as this.  The book is sourced to the hilt, is written in an easy to follow manner and considers a serious topic in a sobering and yet thought provoking way.  There’s a review that was written on this here.

#7J.R.R. Tolkien’s: A Biography by Humphrey Carpenter

Having binged on many Tolkien books in February, and having heard from John Taylor Gatto that reading many biographies allows individuals the foresight to see things they might have not seen, thought getting this book would be a prudent choice.  Haven’t delved into it, but hopefully am able to within the next month or so.

#8:  The Autobiography Of Benjamin Franklin by Benjamin Franklin

Along the same lines as the above, this book was purchased in order to brush up a bit on one of the Founding Fathers through the autobiographical lens.  It’s definitely fascinating getting an inner look at one of the people responsible for helping create America.  It helps put things into perspective in a way that history books lack.   Review will come up soon.

#9:  The Elements Of Style [4th Edition] by William Strunk Jr. & E.B. White

This book was purchased with the intention to grow and learn as a writer.  Being an autodidact and seeking to teach myself more on this lengthy subject, this seemed like a prudent place to start.  BOY WAS IT WORTH IT.  The book, although small in size, offers much knowledge to glean from it.  If you’re a writer, you need to get this book for the tenets within it will undoubtedly help you grow.  That said, there is a newer version of this book available.  Found this out about a week after purchasing the first one, go figure!  Given that it isn’t in my hands yet, I can’t vouch for it, YET, but once it gets here it will be read and reviewed in due time.

Why read a book similar to one just read?  Great question.  Because the 4th Edition of Elements of Style offered so much, I thought that if the new book followed through and offer even more information than the previous book, why not give it a gander?  Might end up gifting the other one out to a friend, but either way, the investment will be well placed.

#10:  The Book Of Virtues: A Treasure Of Great Moral Stories by William J. Bennett

A veritable treasure trove of insights on virtue from countless angles, this book homes in on many of the core tents that used to get taught in society but don’t get taught as much nowadays.  It seems like a great place to seek historical sources that showcase virtues within literature.

#11:  Sekret Machines: Gods: Volume 1 Of Gods Man & War by Tom DeLonge & Peter Levenda

I reviewed this book a few weeks ago and predictably, it is being censored by Amazon, as per usual.  If you want to read how to verify the censorship, read the next bracketed paragraph, and if not, just skip it for the synopsis.

[This can be verified simply.  Click on the link above, scroll down to the reviews, and then take a look at the two pictures to the right of customers who took pictures of the book.  The picture on the right under the name ZyPhReX, was the review done by me.  As you can see from the picture, I gave the book 3 stars.  Now, when you go back into the original book link, and click to check on all reviews that gave the book 3 stars, my review will NOT be showing whatsoever.  My contention is that not only is my review critical of this book in sobering fashion, but it also outlines alternative books to this topic, and that’s something the consortium hates to hear.  Regardless of the reason, the Book Review being censored is ludicrous since it follows all guidelines by Amazon, and the review is even shown under the picture.  And no, this isn’t the first time and its happened and doubt it will be the last.]

My original thoughts were that since Peter Levenda is a top-notch researcher, of whom many books I own, and seeing as DeLonge seems to have a genuine curiosity on the subject, the book might be a good read.  Boy was I wrong!

Although the book does feature intriguing information, the authors paint a picture that’s quite bleak of humanity, even using the parlance of “Cargo Cult” for humans and even go on to write about humanity as if wholly incapable, even there’s plethora of evidence showing otherwise.

Moreover, the authors take a very narrow point of views in explaining UFOs, which is quite detrimental.  Not that beings from another place visiting the Earth is out of the question, far from it, but to use a one dimensional approach to explain a multi-dimensional issue served to make this book a catastrophe.

As I noted in the review of this book:

“… one particular point that was quite disconcerting is the fact that the authors take a unilateral point of view of making it seem like UFOs can only be explained by the alien mythos.  While this is certainly one possibility, and one with some solid grounding, it is not the only one, and not by far.  Dr. Joseph P. Farrell, Walter Bosley, and others have come up with an equally arguable case that argues for human ingenuity as one possible way to explain some UFOs.”

Lastly, a rather unexpected find was being able to get almost 20 National Geographic magazines, each for 10 cents at the library.  I am sharing this in hopes for people to realize that sometimes at local libraries there are incredible deals if you happen to venture there at the right time.

That said, did any of you purchase any intriguing books recently?  If so, what were they?  I am always genuinely curious as to what other individuals read and find intriguing. A significant portion of what I choose to read is because of what other people have made known to me, either directly or indirectly, and  this is my attempt to pay it forward.

Hope you are all well and have a great week.

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This article is free and open source. You are encouraged and have permission to republish this article under a Creative Commons license with attribution to Zy Marquiez and TheBreakaway.wordpress.com.
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About The Author:

Zy Marquiez is an avid book reviewer, researcher, an open-minded skeptic, yogi, humanitarian, and freelance writer who studies and mirrors regularly subjects like Consciousness, Education, Creativity, The Individual, Ancient History & Ancient Civilizations, Forbidden Archaeology, Big Pharma, Alternative Health, Space, Geoengineering, Social Engineering, Propaganda, and much more.

His own personal blog is BreakawayConsciousnessBlog.wordpress.com where his personal work is shared, while TheBreakaway.wordpress.com serves as a media portal which mirrors vital information usually ignored by mainstream press, but still highly crucial to our individual understanding of various facets of the world.

Book Review: Sekret Machines: Gods: Volume 1 of Gods Man & War by Tom De Longe & Peter Levenda

SekretMachines
TheBreakaway
Zy Marquiez
March 22, 2017

Having been familiar with some of Levenda’s work, and others such as Richard Dolan, Jim Marrs, etc. this book held decent hopes for me.

Sekret Machines: Gods: Volume 1 Of Gods Man & War by Tom DeLonge and Peter Levenda is an intriguing book, but not without its flaws.

The book does bring about a considerable amount of information on the subject of the UFOs from a broad point of view.  Throughout the book, the authors present considerable information that couples to everything from the paranormal, ancient civilizations, the occult, and more.  The authors do a fair job of supplanting the book with a veritable amount of sourced material.  This definitely gives the book some veracity.

Footnotes are detailed at the end of each chapter, which makes for ease of access which is great.  When one has to slog back and forth to the end of a book to conduct verify sources it gets painstakingly asinine.  This footnote format certainly streamlines access to that information and is very much appreciated.  The only one better would be with footnotes at the bottom of the page, since it is the most efficient.

As an introductory volume to this topic, the book does a good job.  The book could have been better, but it could have certainly been worse.  The best book out there as an introductory volume to the phenomenon is hands down Richard Dolan’s UFOs For The 21st Century Mind: A Fresh Guide To An Ancient Mystery.  Those seeking a more solid foundation from which to jump-off are encouraged to ruminate upon that book.

Now to the bad.  The book features sections that could have been better served by some serious editing of run on sentences that give Hemingway a run for his money.  Well, perhaps not THAT bad all of the time, but bad enough for it to be noticeable and take away from the content.

Also, one particular point that was quite disconcerting is the fact that the authors take a unilateral point of view of making it seem like UFOs can only be explained by the alien mythos.  While this is certainly one possibility, and one with some solid grounding, it is not the only one, and not by far.  Dr. Joseph P. Farrell, Walter Bosley, and others have come up with an equally arguable case that argues for human ingenuity as one possible way to explain some UFOs.

Additionally, when one couples the possibility of human ingenuity with certain incisive issues such as Military Abductions [MILABS] then one has an exact mirror for the phenomenon that’s equally disturbing in certain respects.  The point of me stating this is not to convince anyone of one possibility or another, far from it.  It’s simply to put the light the fact that there’s extensive evidence by Farrell & Bosley which shows an alternative to the unilateral assertion that extraterrestrials are behind everything.

In fact, one could argue that the authors’ belief in the ET-only hypothesis is dogmatic, and it would be hard to argue against it.  The fact the authors chose the “Cargo Cult” jargon for humanity speaks volumes of how low they see humanity on the totem pole, even though evidence abounds of there being more than their conformist point of view.

If you haven’t read any UFO books, or are a fan of DeLonge’s work, you will probably find some value in this book.  That said, if you are seeking more solid ground that’s just as intriguing, footnoted to the hilt and not dogmatic, then please read any of the following:

UFOs & The National Security State: Chronology Of A Cover Up [Volume 1] by Richard Dolan
UFOs & The National Security State: The Cover Up Exposed [Volume 2] by Richard Dolan
UFOs For The 21st Century Mind by Richard Dolan
Our Occulted History by Jim Marrs
UFOs: Generals, Pilots, And Government Officials Go On The Record by Leslie Kean
Alien Agenda By Jim Mars
Triangular UFOs: An Estimate On The Situation by David Marler

And books that cover the human aspect behind part of this phenomenon:

Saucers, Swastikas & Psyops: A History Of A Breakaway Civilization: Hidden Aerospace Technologies & Psychological Operations by Dr. Joseph P. Farrell
Covert Wars And Breakaway Civilizations: The Secret Space Program, Celestial Psyops & Hidden Conflicts by Dr. Joseph P. Farrell
Cover Wars & Clash Of Civilizations: UFOs, Oligarchs and Space Secrecy Dr. Joseph P. Farrell
Origin: The 19th Century Emergence Of The 20th Century Breakaway Civilizations

The sad part is that the scope of this phenomenon is wider and more intriguing than what many people state it is.  That’s why the books above are mentioned, for those seeking further information in order to be able to decide for themselves whether ET really is the only actor in this stage, or if there’s more to this abstruse topic.

Ultimately, what you think is up to you.  But to be able to come to a decision one has to know the resources available, and at least now some know part of what’s out there and can make up their own mind on the matter.

Peter Levenda the Hidden Code in H.P. Lovecraft Books

Source: GlobalExplorers
January 11, 2017

Drawing on decades of experience, author and historian Peter Levenda turns to the novel as the best and perhaps only way to tell a story that has to be told – that hidden within the tales of America’s most iconic writer of gothic horror, H.P. Lovecraft, runs a vein of actual terror. This book will thrill Lovecraft aficionados, readers of reality-based thrillers, and conspiracy theorists alike.

Book Review: Lovecraft Code By Peter Levenda

20161210_163629TheBreakaway
Zy Marquiez
December 12, 2016

Lovecraft Code by Peter Levenda is an occult thriller that features mystery, suspense, action and more.  

Like a roller coaster, Lovecraft Code starts out at a steady pace laying the context for the book, picks up speed as the mystery deepens, changes directions through different historical narratives, and just when one thinks things are likely to slow down the book then spirals off into a new direction.

The attention to detail the author features in making this book feel realistic is superb.  With a story woven through different time periods but which ultimately coalesces in the present, Levenda merges many seemingly disparate subjects into his first fictional opening salvo that leaves the reader wanting more.

If you enjoy topics such as H.P. Lovecraft esoterica, secret cults, spycraft, necromancy, and all of this with a dash of remote viewing, Nazis, ancient archaeology with additional topics to boot, then this book is for you.

If you’ve read Levenda’s gamut of work, which admittedly encompass many various disciplines, then you should appreciate this.

Lovecraft Code, which was originally to be named Lovecraft Codex but Levenda had to change it, does a rather trenchant job in bringing about a believable backdrop upon various esoteric subjects in an interplay of events that makes you question whether the book is fact written as fiction…or something else entirely.

Now, if you happen to have never read any of Levenda’s work, but still appreciate H.P. Lovecraft’s work, give this a shot.  Levenda does a very commendable job in continuing “The Call Of Cthulhu” mythos but in a very modernized and yet precise setting.

The characters are believable, the story flows rather well, the historical individuals/backdrops the author chooses to include at certain junctures gives the book an even more vibrant feel.  Heck, Levenda even deftly interlaces H.P. Lovecraft himself, as well as Himmler for a minute!

With all things considered, this book does not read like someone’s first fictional novel.  Lovecraft Code feels like a book composed by a seasoned writer of fiction.  Then again, some might argue that Levenda has written books before, and that’s correct.  However, just because someone can write non-fiction books doesn’t mean they can execute fictional ones.  There are plenty of disasters out there, and this one is not one of them.

As a follow up to H.P. Lovecraft’s renown ” The Call Of Cthulhu” this book gets two thumbs up – and a few tendrils! – for a job well done.  Definitely looking forward to more work from Levenda in the future.

Rise Of The Nazi Cult [Part 2 of 2] – A Conversation With Peter Levenda

Did the magician Hanussen give ritual rise to Hitlers power? Why did the Nazi cult send expeditions to Tibet & the Poles? What’s the Spear of Destiny (Longinus’ Lance)? What happened to Rudolf Hess & why? Did “Gestapo” Mueller have leverage of Hitler regarding the death of his niece? Peter continues his elaborations from part 1, touching upon such topics as Nazi connections to Islamism, Zionism & Catholicism, the Hollow Earth, Shamballah/Agharta, & the World Ice Theory, the colonial betrayal of King Faisal, Germans behind Jihadism, Nazi ties to international banksters & oligarchs, “The Business Plot” coup attempt against Roosevelt, & many other obscurities…

Source: ForumBorealis

Rise Of The Nazi Cult [Part 1 of 2] – A Conversation With Peter Levenda

Is the Nazi philosophy based upon magical and occult currents? Who were the players influencing Hitler and the ideology of the Third Reich? Did they have ties to Theosophy, O.T.O., Golden Dawn and other occult groups? What was the Nazis doing in Tibet? Peter Levenda drops by the Forum and elaborates on all of this and more, notwithstanding the occult roots of Nazism… And gives a short obituary to Professor Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke.