California to force Monsanto to label its pesticide as possibly carcinogenic

Source: RTAmerica
March 16, 2017

Agrochemical giant, Monsanto has lost its court battle in California after a Fresno county judge ruled that the active ingredient in the company’s notorious weed killer ‘Roundup,’ glyphosate, can be added to the state’s list of cancer-causing agents. Once the chemical is added to the list, the company will have one year to label that it’s a possible carcinogen on their products. RT America’s Brigida Santos reports, speaking to Zen Honeycutt, founder of Moms Across America, and Alexis Baden-Meyer, political director of the Organic Consumers Association.

Sharp limits on glyphosate coming to Italy; meanwhile EPA wants to raise ‘acceptable’ exposure levels for Americans

Glyphosate

Source: NaturalNews.com
Daniel Barker
August 31, 2016

Italy’s Ministry of Health has imposed sweeping new restrictions on the use of the cancer-causing herbicide glyphosate, a move that represents one of the “largest bans on both consumer and agricultural use of the controversial substance.”

The new restrictions cover a wide range of applications, including the use of glyphosate near schools and other public areas where “vulnerable groups” such as children and the elderly risk being affected by exposure to the carcinogenic substance.

From Sustainable Pulse:

“The list of banned areas includes parks, gardens and courtyards, the edges of roads and railways, urban areas, sports fields and recreational areas, playgrounds and green areas within the school buildings, and areas adjacent to health facilities.

“In addition, the pre-harvest use of Glyphosate – a process known as desiccation – has been banned. The desiccation of crops by spraying glyphosate is a primary source for residual pesticide contamination at the consumer level. Finally, the non-agricultural use of glyphosate is banned on soils composed 80% or more of sand–a measure designed to protect groundwater from contamination.”

A brief history of Europe’s ‘Great Glyphosate Rebellion’

Italy has now become the second EU member state – along with Malta – to announce new restrictions inspired by the “Great Glyphosate Rebellion” that swept through the continent earlier this year, as the deadline for re-approval of the use of glyphosate approached.

A series of articles published by Sustainable Pulse throughout 2016 detail the birth and evolution of the Great Glyphosate Rebellion.

The next few paragraphs are a summary of the important developments:

Initially, the EU was set to vote in 2016 on the re-approval of glyphosate use until 2031, but when it became apparent that many member states would not vote in favor of the long-term extension, the vote was postponed until the end of an 18-month temporary license extension that was granted by the European Commission.

Public pressure played a great part in convincing member state leaders to oppose the long-term extension. More than 1.5 million European and international citizens signed a petition calling for a ban on glyphosate use (the number of signatures has now surpassed 2 million), and their voices were heard. In April, the European Parliament called for a ban on all private use of the substance, as well as a ban on using glyphosate around parks and playgrounds.

The proposed ban also included the prohibition of glyphosate spraying before harvest, and called for the “immediate disclosure of all scientific evidence used by the European Food Safety Authority to back up its claim that glyphosate is unlikely to cause harm.”

The European Commission twice failed in 2016 to secure enough support from member states to vote for long-term re-approval, which led to the 18-month temporary extension.

Now that the temporary extension is in place, and EU member states are beginning to impose nationwide glyphosate bans, the widespread use of the deadly chemical may be nearing an end in Europe.

That’s great news for European citizens who successfully banded together in opposition to the use of the controversial substance.

The disturbing contrast back home in the U.S.

Meanwhile in the United States, the situation is quite different. In 2013, the EPA quietly raised acceptable limits of glyphosate with almost no warning or debate, and the public took little notice.

The agency doubled the acceptable glyphosate residue levels of oilseed crops, including soybean, sesame and flax. The FDA also raised acceptable glyphosate residue levels of sweet potatoes and corn by 15 and 25 times the previous limits, respectively.

It’s a sad fact that Americans seem to care little about the widespread use of a cancer-causing chemical, while Europeans are uniting in great numbers to clean up their environment through meaningful bans and restrictions.

Of course, this is partly due to a failed and sold-out regulatory system that does virtually nothing to encourage public input and debate. However, ultimately it is our responsibility as citizens to unite and stand up in opposition to those who are poisoning our food and environment – while raking in billions of dollars in profits.

Ignorance is no longer an acceptable excuse.

Source: NaturalNews.com

Sources:

SustainablePulse.com

SustainablePulse.com

SustainablePulse.com

SustainablePulse.com

CommDigiNews.com

Glyphosate Weed Killer Unleashes Grotesque Chemical Deformations In Animals [Photos]

Glyphosate weed killer
Source: NaturalNews.com
Mike Adams
May 24, 2016

Glyphosate weed killer, heavily used in conjunction with genetically modified crops, is being blamed for a sharp rise in grotesque, horrific animal mutations taking place in Argentina (see horrifying photos below).

While this story will never appear in the corporate-controlled U.S. media, the UK-based Daily Mail reports that the mutations “look like something from a horror movie – a black dog with a mini trunk protruding from its nose. The baby yellow chick with not two but four feet, the spider piglet with one head, two bodies and eight legs, the goat with two heads and the baby pig with skin so wafer thin you can see the muscles and blood flowing around its body.”

“Farmers blame harsh chemical Glyphosate for causing the mutations,” reports the Daily Mail, adding that “local media said that the deformation was due to the use of pesticides on farmland in the region.”

Number of mutations had QUADRUPLED as use of genetically modified crop chemicals increases

Local who were not aware of the toxicity of glyphosate originally thought the mutations were caused by evil spirits or some sort of demonic curve. But “blame has shifted to the widespread use of the harsh chemical glyphosate which is used as a pesticide,” reports Daily Mail UK:

Argentina is the world’s biggest user of the controversial product, which kills all non-genetically modified (GM) crops. The country supplies GM soya beans that are fed to animals in the UK, and cotton that is used in the manufacture of everything from T-shirts through to tampons. EU policy makers are considering banning the harmful chemical which is known to cause serious birth defects in both animals and humans.

Continue Reading At: NaturalNews.com

Monsanto’s Cancerous Glyphosate Is Inside Everything – Blood, Urine, Air, Water & More

Monsanto2

Source: Mercola.com
Dr. Mercola
March 22, 2016

Glyphosate, the active ingredient in Monsanto’s Roundup herbicide, recently earned the ominous title of the most heavily-used agricultural chemical of all time.1

In fact, an analysis showed that farmers sprayed enough glyphosate in 2014 to apply 0.8 pounds of the chemical to every acre of cultivated cropland in the U.S., and nearly 0.5 a pound of glyphosate to all cropland worldwide.

As you might suspect, when you use this much of a chemical, it doesn’t simply stay on the fields. Laboratory testing commissioned by the organizations Moms Across America and Sustainable Pulse revealed that glyphosate is now showing up virtually everywhere.

Monsanto’s ‘Gift’ to Newborns

The analysis revealed glyphosate in levels of 76 μg/L to 166 μg/L in women’s breast milk. As reported by The Detox Project, this is 760 to 1,600 times higher than the EU-permitted level in drinking water (although it’s lower than the U.S. maximum contaminant level for glyphosate, which is 700 μg/L.)2

This dose of glyphosate in breastfed babies’ every meal is only the beginning. An in vitro study designed to simulate human exposures also found that glyphosate crosses the placental barrier. In the study, 15 percent of the administered glyphosate reached the fetal compartment.

Angelika Hilbeck, Ph.D., senior scientist at the Institute of Integrative Biology in Zurich, told The Detox Project:3

If confirmed in a full investigation, it seems that glyphosate has become a ubiquitous chemical in terms of presence and persistence.

This data also offers a first indication of potential accumulation in the human body, giving newborns a substantial dose of synthetic chemicals as a ‘gift’ for their start into life, with unknown consequences.

This is reckless and irresponsible conduct in a democratic society, which still has a living memory of previous reckless chemical contaminations, such as DDT.”

Glyphosate Found in Blood and Urine Samples

The analysis revealed glyphosate in additional samples as well, including the blood of non-pregnant Canadian women. Their average level was 73.6 μg/L, which is similar to the concentration found to have endocrine-disrupting effects in vitro.

Further, glyphosate was also detected in urine samples, and U.S. women had maximum glyphosate levels that were more than eight times higher than levels found in urine of Europeans.

Where is the glyphosate exposure coming from? It’s likely coming from food (although it could be in water as well). We don’t know exactly how much glyphosate may be in your food because the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) does not test for it.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) just announced in February 2016 that it would begin testing foods for glyphosate, however, which will help to quantify just how much glyphosate Americans are consuming.

For now, the analysis suggests that eating non-organic, genetically engineered (GE) foods (the prime candidates for Roundup spraying) is associated with higher glyphosate levels in your body. The Detox Project explained:4

Glyphosate levels have been found to be significantly higher in urine of humans who ate non-organic food, compared with those who ate mostly organic food. Chronically ill people showed significantly higher glyphosate residues in their urine than healthy people.

In a separate detailed analysis, glyphosate was found in the urine of cows, humans, and rabbits. Cows kept in a GM-free area had significantly lower glyphosate concentrations in urine than cows in conventional livestock systems.”

Glyphosate Is Contaminating Air and Water

Glyphosate and its degradation product, aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), were detected in more than 75 percent of air and rain samples collected during the 2007 growing season in the Mississippi Delta agricultural region.5

This could be even higher now, as since 1996 the use of glyphosate has risen nearly 15-fold.6 The testing commissioned by Moms Across America also found glyphosate in 13 of 21 U.S. drinking water samples tested.7

They contained glyphosate levels between 0.085 ug/l and 0.33 ug/l, which is only slightly below the EU maximum allowed level for glyphosate in drinking water of 0.1 ug/l. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standard for glyphosate in U.S. water supplies is 0.7 ppm.

Further, a 2012 analysis used a magnetic particle immunoassay to test for the presence of glyphosate in roughly 140 samples of groundwater from Catalonia, Spain. The analysis found that glyphosate was present above the limit of quantification in 41 percent of the samples.

This suggests the chemical does not break down rapidly in the environment, as its manufacturer claims, and instead it might be accumulating (both in the environment and in people).

Groundwater, which is water from rain, lakes, streams or other bodies of water that soaks into soil and bedrock, can easily become contaminated when chemicals in the soil with low biodegradability and high mobility empty into it.

When groundwater is used as a drinking water source, this contamination poses a risk to animals, plants and humans alike.

[Bold Emphasis added throughout]

Continue Reading At: Mercola.com