The Health Benefits Of Ginger

HealingPowerHour
Dr. Akilah Schäfer
June 10, 2016

Dr Akilah El presents “The Health Benefits of Ginger”. Ginger is one of the world’s seven most potent disease-fighting spices. It has been review widely regarded for centuries as a natural remedy for a variety of ailments. Find out why and how ginger can benefit you in this video.

Jury: Johnson & Johnson Failed To Warn of Talc Powder-Cancer Risk

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Source: NaturalSociety.com
Julie Fidler
May 12, 2016

On May 2, Johnson & Johnson was ordered by a U.S. jury to pay $55 million to a woman who had alleged the company’s talcum-powder products, which she had used for feminine hygiene, caused her ovarian cancer. It is the 2nd straight time the company lost a verdict.

Johnson & Johnson is currently facing about 1,200 lawsuits accusing it of failing to warn consumers about the cancer risks associated with its talc-based products.

The first time the healthcare products company lost a verdict was in February, when a jury ordered J&J to pay $72 million in damages to the family of an Alabama woman who died from ovarian cancer allegedly caused by using Johnson & Johnson’s Baby Powder and other projects that contained talc for feminine hygiene.

In the current case, jurors deliberated for about a day following a 3-week trial in Missouri state court. They decided to award the plaintiff, Gloria Ristesund, $5 million in compensatory damages and $50 million in punitive damages.

The company plans to appeal, said Carol Goodrich, a Johnson & Johnson spokeswoman, and will continue to defend its talc-containing products.

Ristesund testified that she had used Johnson & Johnson’s talc-based products on her genitals for decades. Her lawyers stated that Ristesund was diagnosed with ovarian cancer and had to undergo a hysterectomy and related surgeries. Fortunately, her cancer is now in remission. [1]

The latest verdict is more significant because it appeared that the facts backed Johnson & Johnson’s claims that its talc-based products did not cause Ristesund’s cancer. Evidence in the case showed Ristesund had suffered from endometriosis and was overweight, both conditions that have been linked to ovarian cancer. Furthermore, Ristesund’s cancer has not returned since undergoing surgery in 2011. Jurors are sometimes more sympathetic towards victims who are terminally ill, or who have died.

The 9 women and 3 men on the jury found Johnson & Johnson and its subsidiary, Johnson & Johnson Consumer Cos., Inc, guilty of negligence and failure to warn about the risks of using talc-based products on the genitals for personal hygiene. However, the jury dismissed an additional claim that the companies had conspired to provide misleading scientific and medical information. J&J’s co-defendant and talc supplier, Imerys Talc America, Inc., was absolved of liability, as it also was in the 1st case. [2]

One jury in the $55 million case stated that Johnson & Johnson’s internal memos “pretty much sealed my opinion.” He added:

“They tried to cover up and influence the boards that regulate cosmetics. They could have at least put a warning label on the box but they didn’t. They did nothing.”

A Little Bit About Talc

Talc is a mineral mined in China that is composed of magnesium and silicon. It has long been associated with lung cancer in workers who mine the substance, but it’s not clear if talc itself causes lung cancer. This is because pure talc sometimes contains asbestos, as the 2 are mined in close proximity of each other.

As a powder, talc effectively absorbs moisture and reduces friction. Women often apply talcum powder to their genitals and to sanitary pads for these reasons. A 2016 study published in Epidemiology showed a correlation between increased risk of ovarian cancer in women who regularly used talc-based powder on their genitals.

For that study, researchers asked 2,041 women with ovarian cancer and 2,100 similar women without ovarian cancer about their talcum powder use. Those who said they regularly applied talc to the genital area, feminine products, and underwear were at 33% increased risk of ovarian cancer. However, the women who used talc were also “more likely to be older, heavier, asthma sufferers, and regular analgesic users.”

Continue Reading At: NaturalSociety.com

Bombshell Lawsuit Links J&J’s Baby Powder to Cancer

J&J To Pay $72 Million For Cancer Death Linked To Talcum Powder

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Source: NaturalSociety.com
Barbara Minton
March 7, 2016

jury in St. Louis has ordered pharmaceutical giant Johnson & Johnson to pay damages of $72 million to the family of a woman dead from ovarian cancer following her prolonged use of their personal care products containing talcum powder.

This class-action suit is one of two filed in 2014, both of which claimed the use of J&J’s Baby Powder and Shower to Shower products were responsible for giving women ovarian cancer.

The action came just a year after a South Dakota woman’s claim that J&J was negligent because it failed to issue a warning of the dangers of these products during the 30 years she used them. She was also diagnosed with ovarian cancer. The suits highlight J&J’s failure to act responsibly in warning its customers about the inherent danger of products containing talcum powder.

The verdict brings the first award by a U.S. jury from the claims against these consumer products. Twelve hundred more cases have already been filed, and many more will likely follow, alleging that the company kept silent about information revealing that talc-based products could ignite cancer, in an effort to safeguard their bottom line.

Continue Reading At: NaturalSociety.com

Johnson & Johnson facing hundreds of lawsuits over cancer-linked talc powder

Source: RT
March 1, 2016

Health care company Johnson & Johnson has had to pay a family more than $72 million in damages after they claimed the company’s talcum powder caused a woman to develop and die from ovarian cancer. RT’s Ed Schultz talks about the case with Ring of Fire radio host Mike Papantonio.