Department Of Education – Our Work Here Is Done


Source: TheBurningPlatform.com
Jim Quinn
April 8, 2016

It appears a few children were left behind.

The Department of Education was created in 1979 and now has an annual budget of $73 billion, with 5,000 government bureaucrats roaming its hallways. When you include all Federal, State and Local spending on public education it totals about $700 billion per year, or $13,000 per student. The Department of Education was created to improve the education of our children.

After 37 years and trillions of dollars “invested” in our children, see below what they have achieved. The public school teachers who have been on the front lines for the last 37 years work 9 months per year, earn above average salaries, get awesome benefits, and have gold plated pension plans – all at the expense of taxpayers. And look what they have accomplished.

The tens of millions of illiterate drones think they deserve $15 per hour because it’s fair, even though they can’t count to fifteen or spell fifteen.

STAGGERING ILLITERACY STATISTICS

California

  • According to the 2007 California Academic Performance Index, research show that 57% of students failed the California Standards Test in English.
  • There are six million students in the California school system and 25% of those students are unable to perform basic reading skills
  • There is a correlation between illiteracy and income at least in individual economic terms, in that literacy has payoffs and is a worthwhile investment. As the literacy rate doubles, so doubles the per capita income.

The Nation

  • In a study of literacy among 20 ‘high income’ countries; US ranked 12th
  • Illiteracy has become such a serious problem in our country that 44 million adults are now unable to read a simple story to their children
  • 50% of adults cannot read a book written at an eighth grade level
  • 45 million are functionally illiterate and read below a 5th grade level
  • 44% of the American adults do not read a book in a year
  • 6 out of 10 households do not buy a single book in a year

The Economy

  • 3 out of 4 people on welfare can’t read
  • 20% of Americans read below the level needed to earn a living wage
  • 50% of the unemployed between the ages of 16 and 21 cannot read well enough to be considered functionally literate
  • Between 46 and 51% of American adults have an income well below the poverty level because of their inability to read
  • Illiteracy costs American taxpayers an estimated $20 billion each year
  • School dropouts cost our nation $240 billion in social service expenditures and lost tax revenues

Impact on Society:

  • 3 out of 5 people in American prisons can’t read
  • To determine how many prison beds will be needed in future years, some states actually base part of their projection on how well current elementary students are performing on reading tests
  • 85% of juvenile offenders have problems reading
  • Approximately 50% of Americans read so poorly that they are unable to perform simple tasks such as reading prescription drug labels

(Source: National Institute for Literacy, National Center for Adult Literacy, The Literacy Company, U.S. Census Bureau)

Read More At: TheBurningPlatform.com

New Bio Evaluates Bush, Who Shouldn’t Have Had So Much Power

bush-trump
Source: TheDailyBell.com
July 4, 2016

Review: ‘Bush,’ a Biography as Scathing Indictment … If Mr. Bush eventually gets a more sympathetic hearing by history, as he hopes, it will not start with Jean Edward Smith’s “Bush,” a comprehensive and compelling narrative punctuated by searing verdicts of all the places where the author thinks the 43rd president went off track. –New York Times

This review of a biography of Bush tracks some of our criticisms of the former president in a recent article, “Nothing to Admire in Bush’s Attack on Trump.” You can see it HERE.

However, the review is positive about Bush’s compassionate conservatism whereas we were not.

Smith is a longtime political biographer and finalist for the Pulitzer Prize.

The review describes both his first sentence and his last so we get a sense of Smith’s approach.

The first sentence of his book: “Rarely in the history of the United States has the nation been so ill-served as during the presidency of George W. Bush.”

The last: “Whether George W. Bush was the worst president in American history will be long debated, but his decision to invade Iraq is easily the worst foreign policy decision ever made by an American president.”

In between are more than 650 pages of fast-paced if harsh biography … “Believing he was the agent of God’s will, and acting with divine guidance, George W. Bush would lead the nation into two disastrous wars of aggression,” Mr. Smith writes. “Bush’s personalization of the war on terror combined with his macho assertiveness as the nation’s commander in chief,” he adds later, “were a recipe for disaster.”

So far, so good. But Smith, the review informs us, “is more approving of his main subject in moments where Mr. Bush follows his original campaign doctrine of compassionate conservatism.”

Smith gives “high marks” to Bush for the No Child Left Behind program.

Also, for expanding Medicare “to cover prescription drugs and for leading an ambitious fight against AIDS in Africa.”

Smith even suggests that Bush had helped “save” the economy through “bold and counterintuitive intervention after the financial crash of 2008.”

Smith portrays a “gracious and warmhearted” Bush who helped make Obama’s transition successful.”

Surprisingly, Smith’s view is that  Bush’s worst mistake was doing too much after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

“The events of 9/11 were tragic, but scarcely catastrophic,” he writes. And the Patriot Act might be, “the most ill-conceived piece of domestic legislation since the Alien and Sedition Acts of 1798.”

One would hope that Smith mentions that the Patriot Act was very obviously prewritten – long before 9/11.

Smith believes Bush had a kind personality but as we pointed out in our previous article, his wars literally murdered millions and so irradiated Iraq that women in certain regions were told by doctors not to have children.

As for Bush’s compassionate conservatism, we pointed out it was a ruse.

He further expanded fedgov’s embrace of authoritarianism. His social spending helped bankrupt the country. None of this is in the least admirable …

He cultivated America’s decline into fascism and corporatism – and did so while pretending these were somehow “conservative” values.

Smith is positive about “no child left behind,” but he may be missing the point of this legislation.

Bush, like Hillary, is part of a globalist cabal that uses US legislation to advance its own purposes.

No Child Left Behind allows authorities to identify and then support the most gifted children. These children have access to scholarships and are often granted access to the elite universities. They then go to work for elite facilities. The program, seen this way, is self-serving to say the least.

As for expanding Medicare and helping to “save” the economy, Smith apparently does not realize that the same power available to Bush for these activities allowed him to visit a kind of genocide on the Middle East.

Presidents always attract these massive biographies. They can focus critically on even minute details. But such books rarely if ever question why a given president should have so much power.

Nor do they note that the power to do “good” things – as they conceive it – also gives the president the power to do bad ones.

No human being should have the kind of power that Bush had access to and utilized. No country either.

Conclusion: The best biography of a US president would be a very short one. It would simply read: “He did much more than he should have. Someone should have stopped him.”

Read More At:TheDailyBell.com

[Book Review] – Drilling Through The Core – Why Common Core Is Bad For American Education By Sandra Stotsky & Contributors

CommonCore
TheBreakaway
Zy Marquiez
June 15, 2016

There are countless books out there on Common Core.  Many of them are rather well done.

However, out of all the books available, this one resonated with me rather well.

Drilling Through The Core, does an exceptional job of detailing both sides of the Common Core issue.

The book’s impartial approach to bring objective analysis to Common Core is something to be highly regarded due to the impeccable way in which the authors/contributors went about in highlighting the disaster that Common Core is becoming.

Carrying out a true nuts and bolt approach, the authors/contributors detail varying components which showcase that Common Core is picking up where the national disaster of No Child Left Behind [NCLB] left of.  And that’s not an understatement either.

There is a reason NCLB has gotten a bad reputation, and its because it doesn’t work.  Countless people/data have shown this to be the case, which ironically is the very reason many are arguing for Common Core.

Along with that troublesome point, the data mining of our children for corporations is also a noteworthy issue to consider.  After all, one thing is information being used for our children’s benefits.  Something else entirely is the information gathered being used for corporate benefits, which of course is what corporations such as the Gates Foundation aim to accomplish.  In the age of mass surveillance/spying and data mining, it’s not surprising that such is the case.

Another nefarious component that’s addressed in the book is the connection Bill Gates and his foundation have.  The unprecedented power that The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has had in helping manipulate what takes place with Common Core is downright disturbing.

If that were not enough, the way in which teaching of history is going to take place totally eviscerates the whole point of teaching it in the first place.  And that’s quite noteworthy, because without a solid foundation in history, an individual will not know the context of what is currently taking place, which is priceless.

Delving into what the comptrollers wish to accomplish in math, the executive director of Eagle Form, Glyn Write, notes:

“The math standard focuses on investigative math, which has been shown to be a disaster…With the new math standard in the Common Core, there are no longer absolute truths. So 3 times 4 can equal 11 so long as a student can effectively explain how they reached that answer.”  [P1]

If that doesn’t leave one’s mind spinning, nothing will.

Furthermore, as a contributor notes:

The Common Core emphasizes teaching students to think of what they learn as “evidence” that can be put to use in making “arguments” as opposed to “facts” that help the student discern how things are.  For the most part, the Common Core steers away from giving students a concrete picture of the world.” [2]

To think, the above are just snippets of the countless issues future generations will face.

If we don’t protect the right for individuals to have a robust and well-rounded education, who will?

We already have some examples of what works, as the book elucidates.  Why not use them?

The future will ultimately rest on how our nation is educated.  It will be up to individuals taking control of their own education, or letting others with nefarious interests do it for profit and control.

Time, and the individual, will tell.

________________________________________________________________________
Sources & References:

[1] Sandra Stotsky, Drilling Through The Core, pg. 48
[2] Ibid., pg. 35

Australian Educator: Computers In The Classroom A Scandalous Waste

GizaDeathStar.com
Dr. Joseph P. Farrell
April 6, 2016

It’s been a while since I’ve ranted and raved about the deplorable state of education in the USSA and its subservient allies, so I am going to have to do so today, thanks to an article shared by Ms. D.O.  In this case, my rant is really someone else’s rant, and his rant came from Australia, which like many other countries in the west, as been suffering the American disease: standardized tests without end, corporate favoritism for the corporations providing the tests and “texts”, and a war on the student-teacher-parent relationship, i.e., a war on the human element.

Computers in class ‘a scandalous waste’: Sydney Grammar head

Here’s the core of the argument, and I’m conflating several paragraphs together so that you can see that the same in is happening in Australia as is happening in the USSA, for those lucky enough to be able to afford sending their children to such schools:

The headmaster of Sydney Grammar School, John Vallance, yesterday described the billions of dollars spent on computers in Australian schools over the past seven years as a “scandalous waste of money’’.

“I’ve seen so many schools with limited budgets spending a disproportionate amount of their money on technology that doesn’t really bring any measurable, or non-measurable, benefits,’’ he said.

Continue Reading At: GizaDeathStar.com

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Joseph P. Farrell has a doctorate in patristics from the University of Oxford, and pursues research in physics, alternative history and science, and “strange stuff”. His book The Giza DeathStar, for which the Giza Community is named, was published in the spring of 2002, and was his first venture into “alternative history and science”.