Catherine Austin Fitts – Empire Endgame: Digital Slave Population by Dark Journalist

Source: DarkJournalist
Daniel Liszt
April 28, 2017

In the exciting Part 2 episode Dark Journalist Daniel Liszt interviews Former US Assistant Housing Secretary and Solari Report Publisher Catherine Austin Fitts. Together they focus on the intensely dangerous moves towards Transhumanist control that the Global Empire is making to attempt to fight the forces of populism exploding around the world. The apex of these moves is the push to create a Digital Currency.

Covert Forces

After looking closely at the covert forces behind the war tensions with North Korea and Syria, Fitts sees the plans of the hidden elite groups that are attempting to set up the conditions to survive and rule when the debt-growth model is exhausted and the Central Banking Warfare model implodes. Their plans call for a Cold War 2.0 with Russia, but after the defeat of Neocon Hawk Hillary Clinton, they are instead trying to sell President Trump on what Whistleblower General Wesley Clark described in 2006 as a ‘Five Year, Seven Nation War’ that would leave the empire intact but ultimately destroy America’s prosperity.

Deep State Vs. Reality Problem

Fitts sees a Deep State systemic problem that involves the Washington Political Establishment, the Corporate Media, Wall Street Forces and the Intelligence Agencies and their attempt to create a false version of reality for general consumption while maintaining a model of intense secrecy. The utilization of Black Budget operations keep the average perception of the general public in a state of perpetual misinformation.

Transhumanist Digital Slavery

Fitts believes that the Global Elite Power Circles are starting to panic and want to bring about their microchipped, chemtrail, digital slave model into full reality as soon as possible. She sees these leadership types as believing in slavery as a means of control and profit with little concern for human rights. The Transhumanist outlook is that they can bring about mechanization and robotics to supply a labor force and boost the productivity that they require and are exploring different means of depopulation for the wider public.

With the modern advent of advanced satellites, invasive tracking technology, drone warfare and the development of a Global Smart Grid, many of their tools for dominance are in place as they weigh their options for consolidation of power.

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Everyone is Doing it: Injecting Micro-Chips is Cool!

microchipss
Source: TheDailyBell.com
April 12, 2017

The government isn’t quite ready to force microchip injections on citizens. But if you want to do it on your own, it just makes tracking you and your data that much easier!

You can be just like the cool kids who are having microchips injected in their hands in order to open locked doors and store payment information. A wave of the hand is all it will take to start your car, buy a latte, or share all your data with governments and corporations.

“I’m turning the internet of things into the internet of us,” said Jowan Osterlund in an interview with Recode. Osterlund is the founder of Biohax, a Swedish company that specializes in injecting small microchips, about the size of a grain of rice, under people’s skin.

The microchips, says Osterlund, can be programmed to speak to other networked devices, like coffee makers, speakers or doors with electronic locks. The idea is that it’s more convenient to wave your hand in front of the door than use a key card.

Inserted by a syringe into the skin between the thumb and the index finger, the chips communicate with other devices using Near Field Communication. It’s a wireless way of linking devices in close proximity to each other, similar to the way Bluetooth works. Contactless payment systems, like Apple Pay, also use NFC.

Last year, Microsoft invited Biohax to its TechDays conference in Sweden to implant some of the speakers at the conference, as well as a few Microsoft executives in attendance, according to Osterlund.

See it’s not scary or weird! Even hip Microsoft executives have it done. And they are on the front lines of technology! If they are doing it, maybe we all should.

The CIA Likes This Plan

And how could becoming a part of the internet of things ever pose any risks? When he was the Director of the CIA, General Petraeus was pretty excited about spying on you “through your dishwasher.”

Earlier this month, Petraeus mused about the emergence of an “Internet of Things” — that is, wired devices — at a summit for In-Q-Tel, the CIA’s venture capital firm. “‘Transformational’ is an overused word, but I do believe it properly applies to these technologies,” Petraeus enthused, “particularly to their effect on clandestine tradecraft.”

All those new online devices are a treasure trove of data if you’re a “person of interest” to the spy community. Once upon a time, spies had to place a bug in your chandelier to hear your conversation. With the rise of the “smart home,” you’d be sending tagged, geolocated data that a spy agency can intercept in real time when you use the lighting app on your phone to adjust your living room’s ambiance.

“Items of interest will be located, identified, monitored, and remotely controlled through technologies such as radio-frequency identification, sensor networks, tiny embedded servers, and energy harvesters — all connected to the next-generation internet using abundant, low-cost, and high-power computing,” Petraeus said

Now the CIA might just get the opportunity to spy on you through the microchip embedded in the fleshy part of the hand between the thumb and index finger.

Right now, the chips going into employees only work in one direction, to send information, not receive it. And they do have to be scanned just inches away in order to give off any information, meaning they aren’t quite GPS chips just yet.

But while all RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) chips may look similar, they are not created equal. The CIA has actually invested in multiple companies which make RFID microchips, some significantly more advanced than the ones used to buy snacks and get into the building.

[The CIA] also likes companies that are working on making smaller batteries, like Qynergy, a New Mexico-based company working on radioisotope batteries, and Infinite Power Solutions, a Colorado developer of thin-film batteries that can power RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) tracking chips.

Speaking of RFID, In-Q-Tel seems to see potential there. In 2008 it invested in Massachusetts-based ThingMagic, a company that makes RFID chips that can “track anything.” The Florida State Attorney’s Office for West Palm Beach uses them to track felony case files, and Ford offered them up as an additional feature for pickup trucks. A contractor can put the tags on all of his tools, so that a quick scan of the truck bed with an RFID scanner will reveal everything in there. ThingMagic was acquired last month by GPS device maker Trimble Navigation for an undisclosed amount. In-Q-Tel has also invested in GainSpan, a company finding ways to make everything wi-fi-enabled, from refrigerators to health monitoring devices, for richer information on something than just its location.

And now we start seeing stories pop up in the media touting the benefits, convenience, and coolness factor of becoming micro-chipped. Dystopian images of the government forcing citizens to become implanted with microchips may, in fact, be overblown. People will do it to themselves, without coercion, just with a little mainstream media promotion.

But Micro-chipping is Convenient So…

A company in Sweden promotes the trend because it makes opening doors and buying smoothies so easy and convenient, and your coworkers will even throw a party for you once you take the plunge to become a cyborg.

The injections have become so popular that workers at Epicenter hold parties for those willing to get implanted.

“The biggest benefit I think is convenience,” said Patrick Mesterton, co-founder and CEO of Epicenter. As a demonstration, he unlocks a door by merely waving near it. “It basically replaces a lot of things you have, other communication devices, whether it be credit cards or keys.”

And that is all great, but your company will also be able to see when you get to work when you leave, how often you use the bathroom, what types of snacks you buy and at what time; basically any location or use data involved with the chip. And of course there are other corporations to think about; mining data is a huge industry.

Since most people are attached to their phones anyway, cell phone data can give a pretty good play by play of what people are doing. Microchips take that one step further so that literally every move you make could be tracked by your employer, other companies, and government agencies. They can map out your movements and activities with such precision and accuracy that they will know more about your habits than you do.

It is actually too bad that we don’t get to enjoy any cool technology because we know the government is just going to exploit it to spy on us. There are clearly benefits to RFID microchips, such as the ease of unlocking doors, starting cars, paying for things and so on.

But while the CIA has its hands in the venture, we, unfortunately, cannot trust that the data gathered from the use of embedded chips won’t be put to nefarious use.

Read More At: TheDailyBell.com

Big Brother Du Jour: Australia has become the first country to microchip its citizens

Microchip

Source: NaturalNews.com
J.D. Heyes
October 14, 2016

You may not have noticed, but there are two kinds of countries in the world these days: Dictatorships led by authoritarians and democracies that are slowly being taken over by authoritarians. Put Australia into the latter.

Organic & Healthy reports that the land Down Under has become the first nation to begin microchipping its citizens, though NBC News predicted some years ago that, by 2017, Americans would all be microchipped.

Australia’s drive to implant citizens with what many believe is the Biblical “mark of the beast” is “a clever propaganda campaign that equates RFID microchipping with becoming superhuman, and people are begging for it,” News.com.au noted.

It’s all about ‘convenience’

One Australian woman, Shanti Korporaal, from Sydney, is at the center of a controversy after having implants inserted in both hands. “You could set up your life so you never have to worry about any passwords or PINs,” she told News.com.au.

The idea is that microchip implants give you a unique identifier, so your implant can be used to get into locked doors, transfer personal information to smart phones and other personal devices – and, of course, allow you to be tracked everywhere you go by government.

Why would anyone voluntarily want to do that? One word, says one microchipping recipient: “Convenience.”

As bad as it is to carry cards around that transfer personal and financial data to massive (hackable) databases and smartphones that serve as personal tracking devices – again, out of convenience – you at least have the option (for now) of leaving them behind when you go somewhere.

You don’t have to take a smartphone with you, or at minimum you can learn some ways to better protect your information. With cards, if you must carry them, there are devices you can use to essentially shield them from ID thieves and tracking devices.

But once you put a tracking device under your skin, the only way to get rid of it is to have it surgically removed, or hack off your limb.

Would authorities actually track you for no reason? It’s already being done.

As we reported in April 2012 that police departments were tracking cell phones without first getting a warrant, as required by the Fourth Amendment to the Constitution. In fact, the American Civil Liberties Union found that “many” of nearly 200 departments surveyed did so sans warrant. While some departments were getting the required warrant first, others “said they use varying legal standards, such as a warrant or a less-strict subpoena.”

Why make it easier to track you?

The practice has continued. In July the Boston Globe reported that the city’s police department had used “a controversial cellphone technology 11 times over the past seven years without once obtaining a search warrant…”

Another major problem is hacking and identity theft. In the NBC News report of several years ago, reporters noted that one of the “problems” that could be solved had to do with medical information: Chips would allow doctors and hospitals to have access to your identity and medical record if you were unconscious and unaccompanied upon admission (and how often does that happen?). But medical information is a top target of hackers and identity thieves. In fact, health care information is the most coveted by cyber thieves because data contained in health records – prescriptions, Social Security numbers, addresses, etc. – are much more permanent than, say, financial data (which is changed once a hack has been detected).

Privacy in a digital world comes at a premium as it is. Our retinas are scanned, our wallets are scanned, our online data is hacked and our movements are already being tracked – both by government and by private corporations. But all of those methods can be mitigated. It’s very difficult to mitigate personal tracking when you’re carrying the tracker inside your body.

The point is, if government can track you 24/7/365, government can control you as well.

Read More At: NaturalNews.com

Sources:

OrganicAndHealth.org

News.com.au

Wired.com

NaturalNews.com

BostonGlobe.com

InfoWorld.com

The “Body Hacking” Movement Pushes Transhumanism to Disturbing New Limits

leadbodyhacking
Justin Worst, Marlo Webber And Jes Waldrip show off an LED light implant.  Grindhouse Wetware calls it the Northstar.

Source: VigilantCitizen.com
VC
March 15, 2016

The “body hacking” movement is about implanting into the human body technology such as RFID chips, cameras and even LED lights. By bypassing health and ethical issues associated transhumanism, this body hacking pushes this movement to strange new frontiers.

As stated in my previous articles about the subject, transhumanism has been heavily promoted in mass media in the past years, whether it be through movies, music videos, video games and documentaries. Often, the word “transhumanism” isn’t even used. Instead, we simply show how a robotic enhancement “upgrades” the human body and makes it cooler, effectively selling the idea to people who believe they are being entertained – especially young people.

A by-product of this trend is “body hacking”, a movement that forgoes the ethical and philosophical questions associated with transhumanism to go right into drilling robotic parts onto one’s body. While many of us dread the day when microchips implants will be a requirement in a dystopian society, some people actually pay to have it done to them.

Here’s an interesting article about the movement from NPR.

Continue Reading At: VigilantCitizen.com