Department Of Education – Our Work Here Is Done


Source: TheBurningPlatform.com
Jim Quinn
April 8, 2016

It appears a few children were left behind.

The Department of Education was created in 1979 and now has an annual budget of $73 billion, with 5,000 government bureaucrats roaming its hallways. When you include all Federal, State and Local spending on public education it totals about $700 billion per year, or $13,000 per student. The Department of Education was created to improve the education of our children.

After 37 years and trillions of dollars “invested” in our children, see below what they have achieved. The public school teachers who have been on the front lines for the last 37 years work 9 months per year, earn above average salaries, get awesome benefits, and have gold plated pension plans – all at the expense of taxpayers. And look what they have accomplished.

The tens of millions of illiterate drones think they deserve $15 per hour because it’s fair, even though they can’t count to fifteen or spell fifteen.

STAGGERING ILLITERACY STATISTICS

California

  • According to the 2007 California Academic Performance Index, research show that 57% of students failed the California Standards Test in English.
  • There are six million students in the California school system and 25% of those students are unable to perform basic reading skills
  • There is a correlation between illiteracy and income at least in individual economic terms, in that literacy has payoffs and is a worthwhile investment. As the literacy rate doubles, so doubles the per capita income.

The Nation

  • In a study of literacy among 20 ‘high income’ countries; US ranked 12th
  • Illiteracy has become such a serious problem in our country that 44 million adults are now unable to read a simple story to their children
  • 50% of adults cannot read a book written at an eighth grade level
  • 45 million are functionally illiterate and read below a 5th grade level
  • 44% of the American adults do not read a book in a year
  • 6 out of 10 households do not buy a single book in a year

The Economy

  • 3 out of 4 people on welfare can’t read
  • 20% of Americans read below the level needed to earn a living wage
  • 50% of the unemployed between the ages of 16 and 21 cannot read well enough to be considered functionally literate
  • Between 46 and 51% of American adults have an income well below the poverty level because of their inability to read
  • Illiteracy costs American taxpayers an estimated $20 billion each year
  • School dropouts cost our nation $240 billion in social service expenditures and lost tax revenues

Impact on Society:

  • 3 out of 5 people in American prisons can’t read
  • To determine how many prison beds will be needed in future years, some states actually base part of their projection on how well current elementary students are performing on reading tests
  • 85% of juvenile offenders have problems reading
  • Approximately 50% of Americans read so poorly that they are unable to perform simple tasks such as reading prescription drug labels

(Source: National Institute for Literacy, National Center for Adult Literacy, The Literacy Company, U.S. Census Bureau)

Read More At: TheBurningPlatform.com

Disturbing Trend In Education – The Federal Deparment Of Education…

Source: GizaDeathStar.com
Dr. Joseph P. Farrell
April 12, 2016

Mr. C.S. found this article and shared it, and when I read it, I was(and remain) both appalled, stunned, and not surprised. Americans, especially in that laboratory-hothouse of “progressivism” known as California, are … well… just plain stupid. No, we are not talking about “lacking in certain areas” or “needing improvement” in other areas. We are talking concrete blockhead stupid. Consider the following article and the frightening statistics it contains:

DEPT. OF EDUCATION – OUR WORK HERE IS DONE

Better yet, let me simply cite it for you:

California

  • According to the 2007 California Academic Performance Index, research show that 57% of students failed the California Standards Test in English.
  • There are six million students in the California school system and 25% of those students are unable to perform basic reading skills
  • There is a correlation between illiteracy and income at least in individual economic terms, in that literacy has payoffs and is a worthwhile investment. As the literacy rate doubles, so doubles the per capita income.

The Nation

  • In a study of literacy among 20 ‘high income’ countries; US ranked 12th
  • Illiteracy has become such a serious problem in our country that 44 million adults are now unable to read a simple story to their children
  • 50% of adults cannot read a book written at an eighth grade level
  • 45 million are functionally illiterate and read below a 5th grade level
  • 44% of the American adults do not read a book in a year
  • 6 out of 10 households do not buy a single book in a year

The Economy

  • 3 out of 4 people on welfare can’t read
  • 20% of Americans read below the level needed to earn a living wage
  • 50% of the unemployed between the ages of 16 and 21 cannot read well enough to be considered functionally literate
  • Between 46 and 51% of American adults have an income well below the poverty level because of their inability to read
  • Illiteracy costs American taxpayers an estimated $20 billion each year
  • School dropouts cost our nation $240 billion in social service expenditures and lost tax revenues

 

Continue Reading At: GizaDeathStar.com

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Joseph P. Farrell has a doctorate in patristics from the University of Oxford, and pursues research in physics, alternative history and science, and “strange stuff”. His book The Giza DeathStar, for which the Giza Community is named, was published in the spring of 2002, and was his first venture into “alternative history and science”.

Celebrity Versus Literacy – You Decide

Source: DailyBell.com
January 18, 2016

Bowie’s death marks the Twilight of the Rock Gods …With David Bowie’s final curtain-call, we are witnessing the end of an era, as the original stars of the explosive rock culture that convulsed the world in the second half of the 20th century are slowly extinguished. We are entering the Twilight of the Rock Gods. – UK Telegraph

Dominant Social Theme: Where will we turn for greatness now?

Free-Market Analysis: We do not wish to speak ill of the dead but David Bowie’s passing does allow us an opportunity to pause and examine popular culture.

This UK Telegraph article does what most journalism does, which is accept the values of popular culture at face value. From the article’s point of view, there is no reason to question the reality of “Rock Gods” or why they came to be. The article takes another point of view entirely, which is what their passing will mean. In other words, what cultural import will it have.

Here’s more:

Deaths of the famous compel us all to contemplate the meaning of our own lives and times, and the deaths of rock stars carry a very particular sting. Its most iconic figures – those great, symbolic archetypes of an age whose art, lifestyle and spirit was substantially defined by the egotistic and energetic values of youth – have turned into old men.

Whatever your reaction to Bowie’s death (the most elegantly stage-managed exit in pop history), we can be sure of one thing: that there is more of this to come. And for a while, at least. I don’t want to tempt fate – indeed, I try not to even think about it – but when Bob Dylan, Paul McCartney, Mick Jagger and Keith Richards eventually shuffle off this mortal coil, we may have to mark the entire rock and roll era over. Who knows what forces of collective shock and sadness that will unleash?

The article goes on to explain that as “icons” age, their record companies are planning whole campaigns around their deaths to maximize sales.

Musicians like Michael Jackson are worth far more dead than alive. It is far easier, unfortunately, to manage the image of someone who is deceased than to create a marketing campaign surrounding a live person who is subject to arrest, a messy divorce or some other inconvenient episode.

Of course, the larger issue here is not the evolution of musical marketing but its significance. Over at Taki’s Magazine, Theodore Dalrymple has posted a commentary on Bowie’s death that attempts to put the recent coverage into perspective.

He writes:

I was astonished at the amount of coverage given to the death of David Bowie … On the day after his death, the supposedly serious newspaper that I take most often when I am in Britain, The Guardian, ran a special 12-page supplement on his life and activity, as well as five pages in its normal section. There have been articles about him on the two subsequent days. I wait patiently for the tide to turn.

Dalrymple makes it clear that the most puzzling element of Bowie’s death has to do with why he is seemingly so venerated. Dalyrmple even quotes one of his lyrics to make a point about the “banality” of Bowie’s output:

There’s a brand new dance
But I don’t know its name
That all people from bad homes
Do it again and again…

Dalrymple adds that he reviewed other Bowie lyrics but “did not find any that were of a much higher or deeper quality.” He closes his article with the “interesting question,” which is “why a newspaper [like the Guardian] … should devote so much space to the posthumous adulation of such a person as David Bowie, and why his activity should be treated with such breathlessly awed veneration.”

Continue Reading At: DailyBell.com