6 Benefits of Lemon

Source: TheHealthRanger
December 13, 2016

Advertisements

Popular Kitchen Remedy Puts Antibiotic To Shame, Research Reveals

Popular Kitchen Remedy Puts Antibiotic To Shame, Research Reveals

Source: GreenMedInfo.com
Sayer Ji
November 10, 2016

Fighting infection with conventional antibiotics is becoming a hopeless affair. The CDC recently warned these drugs are useless in combatting deadly “super germs.” So what can one do? Your kitchen holds the key.

Every day in this country, all day long, patients and doctors reach for conventional antibiotics when opportunistic infections present themselves. The fact that most infections are self-limiting (the body has an immune system, we often forget), and that antibacterial antibiotics are often administered for viral infections, against which they are useless and even infection-promoting, is rarely if ever acknowledged. There is also the problem that antibiotics themselves drive the growth of antibiotic resistant subpopulations of bacteria, effectively creating “super germs” in the process. This effect can adversely alter the microbial substrate for our health for months, years, and perhaps for our entire lifetime (and our progeny’s lifetimes).

The good news is that doctors and their patients are starting to wake up. The concept of taking a probiotic to promote health, for instance, is practically mainstream knowledge now. There is even compelling research that viruses in our body are essential to fight bacterial infections and cancer, and that viruses are so important that we should consider taking proviriotics (substances that feed their growth) to support our virally-base immunity. Watch Dr. Virgin’s amazing NIH lecture below to learn about the health-promoting role of viruses as members of the virome (the viral component of the microbiome) in the video below:

You can also read my article on how the discovery of the microbiome has demolished a key tenet of Germ Theory, namely, that viruses and bacteria are primarily pathogenic in nature: How The Microbiome Destroyed the Ego, Vaccine Policy, and Patriarchy.

The Rise of Natural Medicine for Treating Infections

And so, in the past few years, interest in evidence-based, natural alternatives, which provide safer and more effective relief, have increasingly expanded.   Together, we are re-learning and remembering the wisdom of the ancients: let food be your medicine.

At GreenMedInfo.com, we have indexed a broad range of natural substances that have potent anti-microbial activity, including commonly available and inexpensive ‘kitchen remedies’ like honeygarliclemon, to name but a few. In actuality, thousands of natural substances have antimicrobial activity, which unlike conventional drugs, are far more capable of restoring balance within the microbiome. We have indexed hundreds of studies on this topic, all of which can be found on our Research Dashboard dedicated to Antibiotic Resistant Infection.

 >> Please consider supporting our ongoing Research & Advocacy by becoming a member <<

Garlic Versus First-Line Antibiotic for Vaginal Infection

A relatively recent study adds to the already impressive body of research in this field. Titled “Comparing the Therapeutic Effects of Garlic Tablet and Oral Metronidazole on Bacterial Vaginosis: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial,” medical researchers demonstrated the power of garlic in treating bacterial vaginosis, one of the most common gynecological infections afflicting women of reproductive age today.

Bacterial vaginosis (BV) affects 29.2% of women aged 14-49, and 25% of pregnant women in the US, according to CDC statistics.  According to the study,

“This infection is asymptomatic in 50% to 75% of cases and symptomatic cases present with homogeneous gray-white vaginal discharge with fishy odor, especially after intercourse or during menstruation”

It is believed that BV results from reduced quantities of hydrogen peroxide producing lactobacillus and increased anaerobic organisms such as Gardnerella vaginalis, Mycoplasma hominis, and Prevotella species. Antibiotics are notorious for lacking specificity in inhibiting only those opportunistic strains that can cause harm, which is why it is no wonder that the standard of care treatment of BV with metronidazole has a notoriously poor success rate.[1]

Moreover, antibiotics like metronidazole come with a wide range of side effects, including nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, headache, dizziness weight loss, and abdominal pain.

Even more concerning is the fact that the drug has been identified as a potential carcinogen both by the US National Toxicology Program (NTP)[2] and the WHO International Agency for Research on Cancer.[3]

The new study tested whether garlic could compete with metronidazole in treating BV. Garlic was a logical choice, since it has been used as an anti-infective agent for millennia, and has seen a tremendous amount of clinical validation in the past ten years, as evidenced by the literature on our Garlic Research Dashboard. You can also read previous reporting we have done on the topic of garlic’s immense value in addressing infections, such as Judy Cohain’s article on “How to Treat a Vaginal Infection with a Clove of Garlic.” Much of this research also demonstrates the potent anti-cancer properties of this powerfully medicinal food.

The design of the new study involved giving two groups of 60 married women  (aged 18 to 44 years) either 500 mg garlic tablets comprised of 85.42% garlic powder, or metradizole. Each dose of garlic powder contained the equivalent of 8.9-mg allein, a potent antimicrobial compound.  Both drugs were taken with meals at the dose of two tablets each 12 hours for seven days.

The two different treatments were evaluated using a diagnostic criteria showing active infection known as Amsel’s criteria. Not surprisingly, garlic was found superior to metronidazole at reducing infection at 70% and 48.3%, respectively. Additionally, garlic was found to have far lower side effects.

The researchers concluded:

“This study reveals that garlic could be a suitable alternative for metronidazole in treatment of BV in those interested in herbal medicines or those affected by side effects of metronidazole.”

Isn’t that amazing?

Before the advent of modern, conventional medicine, the world over used natural substances – spices, foods, herbs – to prevent and reverse disease.  In fact, so important and valued were these that they were sometimes traded for their weight in gold. Now we know that the ancients were not as “primitive, superstitious, or pre-scientific,” as widely believed, we can appreciate science that honors their wisdom.  In fact, it was their use of these substances that enabled them to survive thousands of years without modern medicine, and it is the use of these substances that will now allow us to survive modern medicine itself, which has become a primary cause of death.

For more information on natural healing alternatives to common drugs view our database sections titled, “The Superiority of Natural Substances versus Drugs,” and “Natural Substances Equipotent To Drugs,” to see research comparing natural versus synthetic approaches to prevent and treat disease.

And of course, please use our Research Dashboard, which contains research on over 3,000 ailments that can prevented or treated naturally, as evidenced by published, peer-reviewed research culled from the National Library of Medicine’s database MEDLINE (accessible via pubmed.gov)

Also, learn more about natural interventions for Bacterial Vaginosis here.

Looking for more in-depth information on how to combat antibiotic resistant infections naturally? Check out the powerful e-course series by the Grow Network dedicated to the cause:

References


[1] Review Bacterial vaginosis: a review on clinical trials with probiotics. Mastromarino P, Vitali B, Mosca L New Microbiol. 2013 Jul; 36(3):229-38.

[2] “Metronidazole CAS No. 443-48-1” (PDF). Report on Carcinogens, Twelfth Edition (2011). U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Toxicology Program. Retrieved 2011-10-28.

[3] International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) (May 2010). “Agents Classified by the IARC Monographs, Volumes 1–100” (PHP). World Health Organization. Retrieved 2010-06-06.

Read More At: GreenMedInfo.com
______________________________________________________________
© [November 10] GreenMedInfo LLC. This work is reproduced and distributed with the permission of GreenMedInfo LLC. Want to learn more from GreenMedInfo? Sign up for the newsletter here http://www.greenmedinfo.com/greenmed/newsletter.

Grow Your Own Lemon Tree


Source: ReadyNutrition.com
Pamela Bofferding
August 11, 2016

Lemons are such a versatile fruit—especially for summer time foods. They’re great squeezed over fresh fish, mixed into iced tea, or as an accompaniment to your favorite cocktail. Lemon trees are very pretty to look at and they are among the easiest citrus fruits to grow yourself—though you should note that lemon trees thrive in temperatures around 70 degrees—if it’s much hotter or cooler than that in your backyard, you might want to tackle a different planting project!

Lemon trees make wonderful potted plants to have on your patio garden and will be easy to access from the kitchen! With a little bit of effort, you could be using homegrown lemons in your drinks and recipes in just a few months.

Start a Lemon Tree in Seconds

Before you start, you’ll want to make sure that you are using a seed from an organic lemon as non-organic lemons typically have non-germinating seeds that will not grow. You’ll also need a seed pot, a larger planter pot, some plastic wrap, and fertile soil.

Step 1: Work With Damp Soil

Lemons need very moist soil so before planting, you’ll need to properly and thoroughly moisten the potting soil. Because lemon trees have a tendency to dry out, make sure you don’t skip this step (but also don’t overdo it—keep the soil damp but not watery).

Step 2: Add the Soil to Your Seedling Pot

Fill your smaller seedling pot with soil, leaving a small gap (1-2 inches) at the top

Step 3: Pick and Plant Your Seed

Take your organic lemon and squeeze out the juice and seeds into a bowl. Pick the seed that looks the largest and heartiest. Plant your seed a half an inch below the surface of the soil in your seedling pot. Water the soil immediately afterward.

Step 4: Put Plastic Over the Pot (or not!)

Like all citrus plants, lemon trees flourish in warm climates. You’ll want to cover your pot with plastic (regular cling wrap will work but you’ll need to poke several tiny holes in it so that it air can circulate). Be careful that you do not overheat or dry out the soil—if you believe that it is warm enough in the space where your seedling is planted, you might not need the plastic cover.

Step 5: Transfer the Seedling to a Larger Pot

Once the seedling sprouts, you can transfer the seedling into the larger pot that will become your lemon tree’s permanent home. If you’ve been using the plastic cover on your seeding, you can continue to do so once the transfer is made. Once your tree starts to really gain height, you can place the planter outside for a few hours each day so that the tree gets proper sunlight. You’ll know your conditions are ideal when your fruit starts to grow! Also, remember to give your new lemon tree some citrus fertilizer to give it the best growing conditions.

If you want to bypass the seed process, there lemon trees are usually readily available at commercial garden stores and you can even order them online, but you won’t have as much control over what growing medium will be used. Do some research to find out which lemon tree variety grows best in your neck of the woods.

Read More At: ReadyNutrition.com
_________________________________________________________________

Pamela Bofferding is a native Texan who now lives with her husband and sons in New York City. She enjoys hiking, traveling, and playing with her dogs.

Revitalize Your Health With The Cancer-Fighting Properties Of Baking Soda & Lemon

Baking soda

Source: NaturalNews.com
L.D. Devon
June 19, 2016

By their very nature, baking soda and lemon are a powerful food science combination that works against chronic disease, inflammation and cancer. Once inside the body, these two therapeutic food agents begin to help create a more alkaline environment, creating the cellular conditions necessary for nutrient assimilation and making way for greater ATP energy production in the mitochondria of cells. Baking soda and lemon are part of a field of science that has been kept in the shadows for far too long. That field of food science has everything to do with maximizing alkalinity to fight fungus and to destroy the roots of cancer.

Focusing on the science of alkaline-forming foods is crucial for preventing cancer

As pink ribbons and cancer awareness campaigns draw us together, are we merely feeding our cancers and showering our chronic illnesses with attention, sympathy and no practical approach to healing? Good intentions are one thing, but when it comes time to heal from serious cancerous conditions within the body, there’s much more work to be done than just parading our problems and inundating ourselves with radiation and chemical agents. These medical approaches never actually deal with the environment within the body that allows cancer to take hold, reoccur, and metastasize in the first place. Toxic interventions weaken the body and lower overall immunity. That’s why studying the alkaline-forming potential of healing food agents such as lemons and baking soda is so crucial.

More money is spent on cancer detection methods than ever before, but these only leave us with false positives and push us toward these aggressive chemical treatments. It almost appears as if the American Cancer Society is hell-bent on continuing the same failed science of poison and burn cancer treatments that never truly eradicate the root cause of cancer.

Where has the study of food science gone in our pursuits of a healthier, more cancer-free life? Why are we not discussing cancer cell pH and the reasons why cancer cells cannot survive in a highly alkaline environment?

There’s no need for routine cancer detection equipment and diagnoses if one understands the science of the food going into the body on a daily basis. The more we come to understand the importance of consuming alkaline-forming foods, the more we can be active participants in keeping cancer and chronic illness out of our lives.

Baking soda creates a more alkaline environment within

Baking soda has shown promise for alkalizing the area surrounding cancers in mice. Through the years, brave researchers have discovered the mode of action for some natural substances that have the ability to work their way into cancer cells, to guide alkaline-forming nutrients into cells. DMSO (dimethyl sulfoxide) and selenium have proven strong in this area. DMSO is a very absorbent agent, and can uptake alkalizing minerals into all areas of the body including the brain, organs and bone marrow. Germanium, rubidium and selenium are easily absorbed into cancer cells through the potassium pathway – a potential route to eradicating the cancer from the inside out.

Continue Reading At: NaturalNews.com

The Science Of Color: How The Rainbow Can Heal

This article is copyrighted by GreenMedInfo LLC, 2016


Source: GreenMedInfo.com
Deanna Minich Ph.D
June 15, 2016

There is an old adage that claims we should ‘eat the rainbow’ to gain optimal health. It turns out that while we should definitely eat the colors of the rainbow, just being exposed to its light can help as well. 

Every day, we are surrounded by the full spectrum of colors: the bright red of the stop sign on our way to work; the glowing orange-yellow sunlight shining through our window; the sea of swaying green grass in the local park; the dark indigo skin of succulent blueberries and blackberries.

While we might stop and take a moment to appreciate the beauty of these colors, we often don’t think about the powerful effects that seeing and eating different colors have on our physical health and emotional well-being.

Color therapy has been long used in the healing arts, but it’s only been recently that studies are emerging indicating the effects that the colors have on our mood, energy, and health. The conclusions from these studies allow you to harness the power of color in your own life. Here are some color-full findings to encourage you to experiment with colors both on and off your plate:

Red

If you find yourself in a mid-day slump, try switching to a red light or a room with red walls. A 2014 article published in the Conference Proceedings of the Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society found that when participants were put in a room with red light, they had a higher level of brain activity associated with “alertness, agitation, mental activity, and general activation of mind and body functions.” They also were more likely to feel “vigor.” 1

Orange

Orange foods, like carrots and sweet potatoes, get their color from carotenoids like beta-carotene, which may play an important role in reproduction. An area of animal research indicates that beta-carotene concentrates in the corpus luteum (a developing egg in the ovary), where it plays a role in ovulation by assisting with the production of progesterone. 2 Animal studies likewise suggest that beta-carotene supplementation supports ovarian activity and progesterone synthesis in goats 3 4

Polish scientists have discovered that uterine tissues contain beta-carotene 5 , while a 2014 study published in the journal Fertility and Sterility suggests that when women boost their beta-carotene intake, their chances of becoming pregnant seem to improve. 6

Yellow

Yellow is a curious color. It seems to be the color that most people are drawn to, and the one that is most correlated with a normal mood, according to researchers at the University of Manchester. 7 The yellow-colored pigment, lutein, is known to collect in certain tissues of the body, specifically the macula, as well as the skin and in breast tissue. There are several studies that show that healthy yellow foods, like slow-burning carbohydrates, generate energy. A study conducted in Oxford, England, found that yellow mustard bran helped a group of young, active men have a better post-meal response to glucose after eating potato and leek soup compared to eating the soup by itself. 8 Likewise, a Canadian study found that whole yellow pea flour— a complex carbohydrate— helped overweight people improve their use of insulin. 9

Green

Researchers have discovered some fascinating links associating the color green with the heart. For example, an Austrian experiment found that exposing people to green fluorescent light seemed to have a soothing effect on their hearts, affecting heart rate variability (HRV). 10 People who endure continual worry and anxiety seem to have decreased HRV, which is also associated with a number of disorders, including congestive heart failure and depression. If exposure to green light increases HRV, we can imagine that has heart-protective effects and might help to heal grief. Moreover, if green light changes vasculature, then it stands to reason that other conditions involving the vasculature would be impacted by it. In support of this concept, a study was just published indicating that migraine severity is reduced in the presence of green light. 11

Blue

The color blue has powerful effects on the brain and memory. A 2008 British study found that exposing workers to blue-enriched white light improved self-reported alertness, performance, and sleep quality. 12 Similarly, an Australian experiment discovered that exposure to blue light made experimental subjects less sleepy as they tried to complete prolonged tasks during the night. 13 A recent study published in May 2016 showed that people performed better on a working memory task and had greater activation in the prefrontal regions of the brain after being in a blue-lit room for thirty minutes compared with being in a room with amber light. 14

White

The color white has been the focus of promising research about depression. In 2011, Dutch psychiatric researchers found that both blue-enriched white light and bright white light might possibly be effective in treating SAD. 15 Furthermore, a 2004 Danish study affirmed that bright light could perhaps be a helpful treatment even in non-seasonal depression when used in conjunction with antidepressants. 16 A University of California, San Diego study also found that bright light therapy combined with antidepressants and “wake therapy” could be effective in treating depression. 17

White light may also be part of the fruit and vegetables that we eat. A recent study found that extracts from pomegranate and turmeric emitted almost pure white light emission. 18 The researchers discovered that light was mostly emitting from the active ingredients in the foods – polyphenols and anthocyanins in pomegranate, and curcumin in turmeric. If white light can have a healing effect outside the body, think about the potential of eating white light-emitting foods!

As you can see, color offers so much more than visual beauty. By eating a spectrum of naturally-occurring colors, and infusing colors in our surroundings, we can truly harness the power of the rainbow to guide ourselves to full-spectrum health.

For more information regarding colorful foods, please visit the following links to the GreenMedInfo database:
Red: Pomegranate, Strawberry, Beet 
Orange: Apricot, Carrot, Orange
Yellow: Lemon, Pineapple
Green: Broccoli, Kale, Mint
Blue: Blueberry, Bilberry
White: Coconut, Banana, Cauliflower 

References

1 Sroykham, W., J. Wongsathikun, and Y. Wongsawat. “The Effects of Perceiving Color in Living Environment on QEEG, Oxygen Saturation, Pulse Rate, and Emotion Regulation in Humans.” Conference Proceedings: IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society 2014 (2014): 6226– 29. doi:10.1109/EMBC.2014.6945051.

2 O’Fallon, J. V., and B. P. Chew. “The Subcellular Distribution of Beta- Carotene in Bovine Corpus Luteum.” Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine 177, no. 3 (1984): 406–11.

3 Arellano- Rodriguez, G., C. A. Meza- Herrera, R. Rodriguez- Martinez, R. Dionisio- Tapia, D. M. Hallford, M. Mellado, and A. Gonzalez- Bulnes. “Short- Term Intake of Beta- Carotene- Supplemented Diets Enhances Ovarian Function and Progesterone Synthesis in Goats.” Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition (Berlin) 93, no. 6 (2009): 710–15. doi:10.1111/ j.1439-0396.2008.00859.x.

4 Meza- Herrera, C. A., F. Vargas- Beltran, H. P. Vergara- Hernandez, U. Macias- Cruz, L. Avendaño- Reyes, R. Rodriguez-Martinez, G. Arellano- Rodriguez, and F. G. Veliz- Deras. “Betacarotene Supplementation Increases Ovulation Rate Without an Increment in LH Secretion in Cyclic Goats.” Reproductive Biology 13, no. 1 (2013): 51–57. doi:10.1016/j.repbio.2013.01.171.

5 Czeczuga-Semeniuk E, Wołczyński S. Dietary carotenoids in normal and pathological tissues of corpus uteri. Folia Histochem Cytobiol.2008;46(3):283-90. doi: 10.2478/v10042-008- 0040-5.

6 Ruder, E. H., T. J. Hartman, R. H. Reindollar, and M. B. Goldman. “Female Dietary Antioxidant Intake and Time to Pregnancy Among Couples Treated for Unexplained Infertility.” Fertility and Sterility 101, no. 3 (2014): 759–66.doi:10.1016/j.fertnstert.2013.11.008.

7 Carruthers HR, Morris J, Tarrier N, Whorwell PJ. The Manchester Color Wheel: development of a novel way of identifying color choice and its validation in healthy, anxious and depressed individuals. BMC Med Res Methodol. 2010 Feb 9;10:12. doi:10.1186/1471-2288- 10-12.

8 Lett, A. M., P. S. Thondre, and A. J. Rosenthal. “Yellow Mustard Bran Attenuates Glycaemic Response of a Semi- Solid Food in Young Healthy Men.” International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition 64, no. 2 (2013): 140–46.doi:10.3109/09637486.2012.728201.

9 Marinangeli, C. P., and P. J. Jones. “Whole and Fractionated Yellow Pea Flours Reduce Fasting Insulin and Insulin Resistance in Hypercholesterolaemic and Overweight Human Subjects.” British Journal of Nutrition 105, no. 1 (2011): 110–17.doi:10.1017/S0007114510003156.

10 Schäfer, A., and K. W. Kratky. “The Effect of Colored Illumination on Heart Rate Variability.” Forschende Komplementärmedizin 13, no. 3 (2006): 167–73.

11 [No authors listed]. Photophobia in migraine does not apply to green light, which may lessen headache severity. Nurs Stand. 2016 Jun 8;30(41):14-5. doi: 10.7748/ns.30.41.14.s17.

12 Viola, A. U., L. M. James, L. J. Schlangen, and D. J. Dijk. “Blue- Enriched White Light in the Workplace Improves Self- Reported Alertness, Performance and Sleep Quality.” Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health 34, no. 4 (2008): 297–30

13 Phipps- Nelson, J., J. R. Redman, L. J. Schlangen, and S. M. Rajaratnam. “Blue Light Exposure Reduces Objective Measures of Sleepiness During Prolonged Nighttime Performance Testing.” Chronobiology International 26, no. 5 (2009): 891–912.doi:10.1080 /07420520903044364.

14 Alkozei A, Smith R, Pisner DA, Vanuk JR, Markowski SM, Fridman A, Shane BR, Knight SA, Killgore WD. Exposure to Blue Light Increases Subsequent Functional Activation of the Prefrontal Cortex During Performance of a Working Memory Task. Sleep. 2016 May 25. pii:sp-00684- 15. [Epub ahead of print]

15 Meesters, Y., V. Dekker, L. J. Schlangen, E. H. Bos, and M. J. Ruiter. “Low- Intensity Blue- Enriched White Light (750 Lux) and Standard Bright Light (10,000 Lux) Are Equally Effective in Treating SAD. A Randomized Controlled Study.” BMC Psychiatry 11(2011): 17. doi:10.1186/1471- 244X- 11- 17.

16 Martiny, K. “Adjunctive Bright Light in Non- Seasonal Major Depression.” Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica: Supplementum 425(2004): 7–28.

17 Loving, R. T., D. F. Kripke, and S. R. Shuchter. “Bright Light Augments Antidepressant Effects of Medication and Wake Therapy.” Depression and Anxiety 16, no. 1 (2002): 1–3.

18 Mishra, A. K., and V. Singh. &quot;White Light Emission from Vegetable Extracts.&quot; (2015).

Read More At: GreenMedInfo.com

_________________________________________________________________

© [June 15th 2016] GreenMedInfo LLC. This work is reproduced and distributed with the permission of GreenMedInfo LLC. Want to learn more from GreenMedInfo? Sign up for the newsletter here http://www.greenmedinfo.com/greenmed/newsletter.”

_________________________________________________________________

14 Toxin-Removing Superfoods That Boost Your Immune System

Superfoods
Source: NaturalNews.com
Isabelle Z.
June 19, 2016

Our bodies are bombarded with all manner of toxins as we go about our daily lives. Even those of us who go to great lengths to avoid known toxins – for example, by eating organic foods and avoiding proceed meats – are still vulnerable. Toxins can sneak in from everywhere, whether it’s the air you breathe, the water you drink, or that lotion you slather on every time you get out of the shower.

While it’s impossible to completely escape toxins in modern life, one way we can stack the odds in our favor is to consume superfoods that can help flush these toxins out of our systems. Here is a look at 14 superfoods that will send those toxins in your body scrambling, while boosting your immune system at the same time.

1. Garlic has long been used to detoxify the body, and it can also support healthy liver function so that the organ can carry out its important task of cleaning your blood.

2. Turmeric. With so many benefits, it would probably be easier to list the issues turmeric can’t help with. When it comes to detoxing, however, it is particularly powerful, thanks to its ability to stimulate liver function.

3. Cucumbers might be mostly water, but that doesn’t mean they should be overlooked. They help alkalize the body and flush toxins out, and are very easy to add to your diet.

4. Broccoli has a number of impressive health benefits, but when it comes to detoxing, it’s a superstar. It works with liver enzymes to help make toxins easier to eliminate.

5. Chlorella has long been acknowledged for its ability to flush toxic metals out of the body. This superfood can help boost antioxidants as well as immune system function.

6. Lentils contain plenty of zinc, which boosts your immune system and is necessary for your body’s metabolic processes. It also helps with liver metabolism.

7. Beetroot can help to restore your body’s pH balance, while infusing it with nutrients such as iron, magnesium, zinc and calcium. Its strong detoxifying properties are supported by its high content of betaine and pectin.

8. Avocado. You simply can’t go wrong with this superfood. Avocados deliver from several angles. Their glutathione helps remove your body’s toxins while also lending some anti-carcinogenic properties. In addition, their high Vitamin K content is associated with good liver health.

9. Cabbage can help break down harmful chemicals in your body, such as those found in medications or pesticides, thanks to its sulfur-containing compounds.

10. Artichokes are full of prebiotic inulin, which your body uses to help form probiotics in your gut. This helps take the pressure off your liver to do all of the detoxing.

11. Mung beans. On a similar note to lentils, these powerful beans are known to absorb toxic residues from the walls of your intestines.

12. Green tea’s abundance of antioxidants make it well suited to washing toxins right out of your system. Moreover, it is rich in catechins, which boost liver function.

13. Watercress. This natural diuretic can protect cells from free radicals while boosting liver enzymes.

14. Lemon is truly one of the best foods for detoxification, thanks to its high content of liver-supporting pectin and betaine. Squeezing lemon juice into your water is an easy way to fit this into your daily routine.

As you can see, nature provides us with everything we need to keep our bodies in top shape and help undo some of the harm caused by mankind. If you’re concerned about toxins in your food, the book Food Forensics by Mike Adams, the Health Ranger, is a must-read. Keep in mind that you’ll want to opt for the organic varieties of these foods when you’re detoxing, to avoid introducing even more toxins into your system.

Read More At: NaturalNews.com

Eat more of these foods to help balance your body’s alkalinity and prevent cancer

PH balance
Source: NaturalNews.com
David Gutierrez
February 11, 2016

Many people have heard of the “pH miracle plan” for restoring and preserving health, but are unclear on exactly which foods are considered “acidic,” and which are considered “alkaline.”

The “pH miracle” is an idea developed by researcher Robert O. Young, and introduced in his 2002 book of the same name. Young suggested that the body’s natural pH is slightly alkaline, but that the modern diet is high in foods that tend to produce an acidic effect in the body. These foods, such as processed sugar, dairy, meat, junk food, alcohol and caffeine, shift the body’s pH towards acidic. This causes acid wastes to build up in the body’s organs, producing a variety of diseases, including cancer.

“The focus for preventing and reversing cancer must be on maintaining the alkaline pH of the body fluids, and a recognition that cancer is a systemic acidic condition,” Young has written.

Top five alkaline superfoods

Unsurprisingly for anyone who follows the most current dietary advice, the most alkaline foods tend to be fruits, vegetables and oily foods, such as avocados, nuts and olives. These foods, by no coincidence, also tend to provide numerous other health benefits. The following five foods are considered among the most alkaline-promoting:

Cabbage, in addition to its alkaline nature, has been shown to fight infections and cancer. If you boil cabbage, be sure to save the water and use it in soup, sauces, or even as a beverage. For an extra health boost, eat your cabbage fermented in the form of sauerkraut (make it at home, or buy it in the refrigerated section so it hasn’t been killed!).

Olive oil, made famous by proponents of the Mediterranean diet, is known to be high in heart-healthy monounsaturated fatty acids. It is also high in vitamin E, which has been shown to reduce the symptoms of hot flashes and may benefit heart health as well.

Flax seeds and flax seed oil have also gained quite a bit of attention, largely for their high content of omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3s, which are thought to be too scarce in the Western diet, have been linked with improvements in cholesterol and blood pressure, among other benefits. Flax seeds are also high in lignans, which help fight cancer and improve kidney function. Flax seeds can be eaten whole or ground, but many of the nutrients are best absorbed from the ground seeds or the oil.

Melons are incredibly nutrient rich, containing high levels of dietary fiber, potassium, folic acid and vitamins A, B6 and C. They have been shown to help prevent heart attack and stroke, perhaps by helping thin the blood. Watermelon is also considered an alkaline food.

Buckwheat is relatively uncommon in the Western diet, but functions as a highly effective wheat substitute for those trying to reduce their intake of the latter grain. Buckwheat has been shown to help prevent strokes, and ease the discomfort of hemorrhoids and varicose veins.

More alkaline diet tips

Other alkaline foods include alfalfa sprouts, avocado, broccoli, brussels sprouts, cauliflower, celery, chives, cucumber, garlic, grapefruit, green beans, green peas, leeks, lemon and lime, lettuce, millet, onion, parsley, pears, pumpkin, radishes, sesame seeds and paste (tahini), soy (beans, sprouts and products), spinach, tomato, wild rice and zucchini.

Continue Reading At: NaturalNews.com