…Oh, And By The Way, It’s Not Just Germany That Is Upset…

alternative news
Source: GizaDeathStar.com
Dr. Joseph P. Farrell Ph.D.
June 20, 2017

Sometimes I feel like I’m living in some sort of geopolitical time warp, or a teacup carnival ride, based not on whirling teacups, but whirling countries, all spinning around on an out of control machine called Brzezinski’s Folly. Brzezinski’s folly is a machine that runs on the assumption that, America being the “sole remaining superpower”, it can and should attempt to run the rest of the world, no matter what the cost…

…even if the cost means pushing powerful allies like Germany and Japan away.

Case in point: yesterday, you’ll recall, I blogged about my long-held, seldom-voiced suspicion that some sort of covert warfare has been going on between the USA and Germany for quite some time. I finally have been talking more openly about that suspicion, since it seems to be being confirmed by various German and European leaders, not the least of whom is Chancellorin Merkel herself.

But in sifting through this week’s emails, the other shoe dropped, in this article shared by Mr. J.C.; and as you read this, when was the last time you saw the Chinese Premier shaking hands with the Japanese Premier, and both men were smiling?

Even Japan Is Now Considering Joining China’s One Belt, One Road

I cannot get out of my head what a monumental symbol this picture is, notwithstanding the contents of the article itself. We cannot approximate the earthquake it signals, especially in the Orient. There is bad blood between China and Japan… the Rape of Nanking, the Japanese invasion and occupation of Manchuria and the establishment of a Japanese puppet state there under the de facto control of Field Marshal Terauchi. Then the plundering under Operation Golden Lilly. Nor was it all one-sided: the Chinese entry into the Korean war – Korea being a former Japanese colony – Mao’s bluster and threats…

For this to happen is a major event. But as readers of this website know, it has been a long time coming, and was about to happen a few years ago. There was talk of a state visit of Emperor Akihito to Beijing, then… Fukushima happened. I do not need to recount the more-than-suspicious chain of events, because readers of this website are well aware of them.

Shinzo Abe has, in his tenure as Japanese Premier, accomplished some truly amazing feats of diplomacy. He has managed, with his counterpart Mr. Putin, to side-step the thorny issue of the legal status of the Kuril  islands, to begin actual economic development of them, jointly with Russia. That was a major hatchet, not only to bury, but to turn into something economically beneficial.

Now there is China, and its Silk Road project:

I want to focus on some paragraphs in this article, for I tend to see things very differently than does Mina Pollman, author of the article:

Japan would, of course, prefer a U.S.-based regional order and has thus been leery of OBOR. But after watching the United States retreat under President Donald Trump – most dramatically by pulling the U.S. out of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) – it is understandable that Japan is considering alternative options, such as limited cooperation with China.

Abe specifically stated that one of the conditions that would have to be met for Japanese participation in OBOR is “harmony with a free and fair Trans-Pacific economic zone,” in reference to the requirements, including labor and environmental regulations, painstakingly negotiated in the 12-country TPP deal.

Abe also noted that it is “critical for infrastructure to be open to use by all, and to be developed through procurement that is transparent and fair. … I furthermore consider it essential for projects to be economically viable and to be financed by debt that can be repaid, and not to harm the soundness of the debtor nation’s finances.”

Japan’s concerns about OBOR’s lack of transparency mirror its criticisms of the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) – which Japan is also considering joining, after resisting it for so long. With rumors that the United States might join, Japan may find the idea more attractive. (Emphasis added)

While the article makes it sound as if Japan’s turn to China is a result largely of the recent administration’s policies, I suspect – strongly – that this turn has been considered by (if Ii may so put it) the mandarins in Tokyo for some time. The instability that the USA has fostered in recent decades as a result of Brzezinski’s Folly, along with an economy that can only export GMOs and war has caused a “rethink” of relations from Tokyo to Berlin. The Trump administration and the TPP are the excuse and crisis of opportunity that were seized to do what they had long been thinking. Again, in this respect, it is crucial to recall that Japan was attempting to make these overtures before the Abe government took power.

Mr. Abe’s two-step here has been carefully conceived. Unlike the previous Japanese government, Mr. Abe decided to rearm, and to change the part of the Japanese constitution that put an upper limit based on percentage of GDP to defense spending. This, publicly, was done to reassure Washington that Japan was going to “do its part” for Pacific rim security. But Mr. Abe’s unstated goal, I contend, was to send messages to North Korea and China, particularly the latter. While a symbolic gesture, the message is clear: we can rearm, if we want to… now, let’s talk… Japan’s rearmament, in other words, was as much about perceived growing weakness and instability in Washington, as it was about helping Washington.

Me. Abe’s position is further enhanced by his agreements with Russia, not just with the Kuril islands, but more importantly, by the extension to Russia, by Japan, of the use of its financial clearing agency in the Pacific, widely used in the region. This, readers of the website may recall, happened a couple of years ago, in the aftermath of the imposition of sanctions on Russia. In other words, Japan did not “play ball” with Washington, and put into place a major component of an independent financial clearing system with Russia.

It’s that financial clearing aspect of the story that, I suggest in today’s high octane speculation, is behind this story, and Japan’s need for more “transparency” in the “One belt one road” project: for “transparency” read “Japanese participation” in whatever financial clearing arrangements the Chinese have in mind as an alternative to the West’s “SWIFT” system. Additionally, “transparency” also means in other space-related matters and ventures, because China has made it abundantly clear that the “One road one Belt” is not simply confined to planet Earth.

See you on the flip side…

Read More At: GizaDeathStar.com
________________________________________________

About Dr. Joseph P. Farrell

Joseph P. Farrell has a doctorate in patristics from the University of Oxford, and pursues research in physics, alternative history and science, and “strange stuff”. His book The Giza DeathStar, for which the Giza Community is named, was published in the spring of 2002, and was his first venture into “alternative history and science”.

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CNN #FakeNews Amanpour Challenged to Interview Aleppo Boy’s Father – #NewWorldNextWeek

Source: CorbettReport | MediaMonarchy
June 16, 2017

Welcome to New World Next Week — the video series from Corbett Report and Media Monarchy that covers some of the most important developments in open source intelligence news. In this week’s episode:

Story #1: Amanpour Challenged To Interview “Aleppo Boy” She Exploited For War Propaganda http://bit.ly/2t4pqQN

MintPress Meets The Father Of Iconic Aleppo Boy, Who Says Media Lied About His Son http://bit.ly/2skcKaz

Wikipedia: Christiane Amanpour http://bit.ly/2ryniio

Complete 9/11 Timeline: Christiane Amanpour http://bit.ly/2ru8eqL

Wikipedia: James P. Rubin http://bit.ly/2toWqCJ

Hillary Clinton Email Archive: Secretary Clinton’s Interview With Christiane Amanpour http://bit.ly/2suRY94

Story #2: Young People Hit Tokyo’s Streets To Protest “Anti-Conspiracy Bill” http://bit.ly/2sdl9us

Update: Japan Enacts Broad Anti-Conspiracy Law http://s.nikkei.com/2ryJrwJ

Expert Disputes Japan Government Claim That Conspiracy Bill Needed To Ratify U.N. Treaty Related To 2020 Olympics http://bit.ly/2rtXPeA

Conspiracy Theory Becomes Frightening Reality For Japan http://bit.ly/2ru2cGH

Story #3: “We’re Not Monsters” – Ontario Township Defends Shuttering Girl’s Lemonade Stand 🍋💰 http://bit.ly/2ryk6Ds

6 Illicit Lemonade Stands Towns Had to Shut Down http://bit.ly/2rj6U60

NWNW Update: Chimpanzees Aren’t People, Don’t Have Right For Habeas Corpus http://bit.ly/2s3MYqH

NWNW Update: Germany’s Merkel Says Digital World Needs Global Rules http://bit.ly/2ryeg4W

While Trump Was In Riyadh Dancing & Selling Arms, This Was Happening…


Source: GizaDeathStar.com
Dr. Joseph P. Farrell Ph.D.
May 31, 2017

Normally I do not use or go to this source, but in this case I make an exception, since it highlights the fundamental problem with the US Empire’s foreign policy: it is ossified, and completely backward looking. Indeed, by tying it to a regressive and backward looking country like Suadi Arabia, Mr. Trump may have committed a strategic error that will affect Americans, Saudis, and for that matter, Arabs elsewhere, for generations to come. My thoughts about the implications of his trip, and the ambiguous long term rationale behind it, were expressed, albeit somewhat clumsily, in last Thursday’s News and Views from the Nefarium.

This piece, however, which was shared by Mr. H.B., highlights the problem: while Mr. Trump was dancing with a few backward Saudi tribesmen, Mr. Xi was hosting a large gathering of nations in Beijing to expand the economic cooperation of the BRICSA bloc, and to work out details of building out China’s New Silk Road project:

https://www.technocracy.news/index.php/2017/05/21/world-leaders-gather-beijing-us-sinks-irrelevancy/

Note, the following:

Even countries that are cool on the Chinese initiative, including India and Japan, sent representatives to the summit that carried a bit more clout than the pathetic representation of the United States, Matt Pottinger, a little-known special assistant to Trump and the senior director for East Asia of National Security Council. In fact, the only reason Trump sent anyone to represent the United States at the Beijing gathering was because of a special request made by President Xi during his recent meeting with Trump at the president’s private Mar-a-Lago Club resort in Palm Beach, Florida.

South Korea, which saw relations with China sour over America’s placement of Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) missile system in South Korea, sent a delegation to Beijing after a phone call between South Korea’s new liberal president, Moon Jae-in, and President Xi. Moon responded to the phone call by sending a delegation led by his Democratic Party’s veteran legislator to Beijing.

Even North Korea, which rankled South Korea, Japan, and the United States by firing a ballistic missile into waters near Russia, sent a delegation to the Beijing meeting headed by Kim Yong Jae, the North’s Minister of External Economic Relations. The Trump administration, which sent a virtual unknown to Beijing, complained loudly about North Korea’s representation at the Silk Road summit. But Washington’s complaint was conveyed by someone as unknown as Mr. Pottinger, Anna Richey-Allen, a low-level spokesperson for the U.S. State Department’s East Asia Bureau. The reason why the United States is being spoken for by middle-grade bureaucrats is that the nation that still believes it is the world’s only remaining «superpower» is now governed by an administration rife with top-level vacancies, inter-agency squabbling, and amateur league players.

Yes, that’s right: Japan, India, North and South Korea, all sent high level delegations.

So did eastern Europe:

These EU member state leaders included Italian Prime Minister Paolo Gentiloni, Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy, Polish Prime Minister Beata Szydlo, Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras, Czech President Milos Zeman, and Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban. Moreover, had British Prime Minister Theresa May not been in the middle of a general election campaign, she would have been in Beijing. Nevertheless, she sent British Chancellor of the Exchequer Philip Hammond in her place.

As did the following institutions and other countries:

The United Nations Secretary General, Antonio Guterres, was there, along with the President of the World Bank Jim Yong Kim and International Monetary Fund Managing Director Christine Lagarde. Also present in Beijing were the presidents of Turkey, Philippines, Argentina, Chile, Indonesia, Kyrgyzstan, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Switzerland, Kenya, Uzbekistan, and Laos, as well as the prime ministers of Vietnam, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Serbia, Malaysia, Mongolia, Fiji, Ethiopia, Cambodia, and Myanmar.

Ministerial delegations from Afghanistan, Australia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Brazil, Egypt, Finland, Iran, Kuwait, Lebanon, Maldives, Romania, Nepal, New Zealand, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, South Sudan, Sudan, Syria, Tanzania, Thailand, Tunisia, Uganda, and the United Arab Emirates were at the Beijing summit. Japan was represented by the senior adviser to Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and Secretary General of the Liberal Democratic Party, Toshihiro Nikai. France, which was experiencing a change of presidents, sent former Prime Minister Jean-Pierre Raffarin.

The Silk Road initiative has projects planned in all the nations whose governments were represented in Beijing, except for the United States and Israel. In addition to the nations represented by their government heads of state and ministers, Silk Road agreements were signed between China and Palestine, Georgia, Armenia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Albania, Tajikistan, Brunei, Croatia, and East Timor.

But, hey, according to former House Speaker Newt Gangrene…er… Gingrich, the USA can herald the new foreign policy triumph of Mr. Trump selling one hundred billion plus dollars to the (out)house of Saud as a major foreign policy shift and breakthrough.

Have we really lost our collective minds to this degree? Granted the regime of China leaves much much to be desired, as do the regimes of many of the countries represented in Beijing. But they are agreed, it seems – even the Japanese and North and South Koreans, heck, even the Saudis smelled the coffee and sent a delegation – on one thing, and that’s getting something done that will benefit everyone, like building railroads and highways and so on.

While the USSA is selling arms, and the means to manufacture them.

I don’t think for a moment that Mr. Xi is so naive to believe that all of these countries get along with each other, or don’t have competing interests.Nor do I think Mr. Xi is so naive as to believe that a conference this large, with this many in attendance, will really accomplish anything, much less bring everyone together in a group hug and kumbaya moment. We’ve all been to those “required meetings”. They do nothing but waste time, solve or settle little, and accomplish even less. But they do do one thing, and that is they simply get people talking about and thinking about certain things, and then, when enough of a critical mass of thought congeals, about doing and accomplishing them. That, it seems, is part of his – and China’s – cultural and economic strategy: simply generate excitement about accomplishing something and getting it done. Already in the past few months we’ve seen the first freight train from China arrive in London, and return to China. Turn the clock back just ten years, and this would have been unthinkable. Now translate that into highways running from, say, Beijing to Berlin(dwarfing the Kaiser’s old Berlin-to-Baghdad railway), and you get the idea.

Meanwhile, we’re concerned about the peanuts of a mere one hundred billion of arms sales to the Saudis.

And that’s the point: Mr. Xi is offering the world a vision. We may not like Mr. Xi. We may not even like (I certainly don’t) Communism in any form, even the modern “benign” Chinese form (benign if one compares it to Mao, or Stalin). But Mr. Xi is offering a vision nonetheless. (Heck, being a [much out of practice] organist, I find it very interesting that China seems to be on a pipe-organ-building spree and the Chinese appear to be enjoying what, for them, is an [increasingly less] rare instrument. Translation: China is also trying to become a bridge or unifying culture.)

Now compare that to what the USSA is offering (which is what, exactly? Drones? Surveillance? Tanks? Bombs? bad refrigerators? shoddy computer software operating systems? pay for play bottomlessly corrupt politicians? pedophilia?) and you get the idea. We’re fast becoming as irrelevant and unwanted as the Yugo, the latest in Serbo-Croatian technology.

See you on the flip side…

Read More At: GizaDeathStar.com
________________________________________________

About Dr. Joseph P. Farrell

Joseph P. Farrell has a doctorate in patristics from the University of Oxford, and pursues research in physics, alternative history and science, and “strange stuff”. His book The Giza DeathStar, for which the Giza Community is named, was published in the spring of 2002, and was his first venture into “alternative history and science”.

The Power Of Soft Power: Japan, Russia & The USSA

Source: GizaDeathStar.com
Dr. Joseph P. Farrell Ph.D.
May 12, 2017

Every now and then I receive an article that is so thought-provoking I have to share it, and my own opinions about it, even though – as is the current case – my thoughts are still in the process of formation. This is consequently not quite an “op-ed” piece; it’s more of a “thinking out loud ramble”. In this case, the subject of my ramble is that of “soft power”, the idea of “culture” as a geopolitical card that looks increasingly, to my amateur eyes, like it is being played on the world scene, and played deftly by some players that know how to play it.

Permit me an anecdote here: months ago I had a private conversation with a friend who is a financial advisor for a major government in the Pacific. We were discussing the way Mr. Putin has been able to so successfully play the soft power culture card. At the time, I was analyzing Russia’s moves on the world stage in terms of a rather radical thesis, namely, that Putin’s Russia is not a “neo-Stalinist” state, as it is usually misunderstood to be by the West and in particular by the corporate controlled media of the West, and its quackademic “think tanks.” Rather, I opined to my friend, Russia was experimenting with something very unique, something defined by its long history: its grounding as a culture in Eastern Orthodoxy; its invasion by, and eventual expulsion of, the Mongols; its Drang nach Osten and the “collection of the Russian lands” under Ivan the terrible and the drive across Siberia to the Pacific; its “westernization” under Peter the Great; and, of course, its sad experience with Marxism, a western philosophical import; its invasion and surrender to the Central Powers in World War One and following civil war; the devastating invasion by Hitler in 1941; and finally, the collapse of the Soviet Union.

What Putin’s Russia was and is, I argued with my friend, is that it is the world’s first “post-post modernist State,” and that meant, I argued, that we would see Russia doing some “unusual things” on the world stage: (1) it would challenge the dogma of the globaloneyists that the nation-state is obsolete, and the world needs to be run by the likes of David Rockefailure and Darth Soros. (I don’t know about you, but that idea appeals to me even less than the world being run by Bonaparte, Wilhelm II, or Adolf Hitler.)  (2) Russia would begin to play its soft power culture card, not only domestically, but internationally, and make a play to speak for the culturally and politically disenfranchised conservative in the West. To be sure, that was a very radical idea, but I was perfectly serious in proposing it. Mr. Putin had, at the time we were having our discussion, made several speeches to the effect that Russia’s way forward lay, in part, by not neglecting its spiritual heritage; Russia would, he opined, protect the rights of minorities, but it would not allow them to tyrannize the majority nor overturn that inheritance. But that was for domestic consumption. Shortly after we had our discussion, sure enough, Mr. Putin began to address these types of remarks to the outside, and more specifically, to the West, targeting those individuals in the West of similarly conservative cultural values, while taking direct aim at the cultural progressivist left in the West. In short, Mr. Putin was maneuvering Russia – and himself – to be the representative of the culturally and politically disenfranchised conservative in the West.  Mr. Putin and his advisors are attempting to create a new national branding of Russia, and they have been more or less successful.

Which is why I found this article shared by Mr. T.M. about Japan’s use of the soft power culture card so very thought-provoking:

Japan has turned its culture into a powerful political tool

In the main, I have to agree with this article: Japan has managed, quite cleverly and successfully, to create a national brand of “western technology and traditional Japanese culture” and if one looks closely and carefully, much of that philosophical approach has spread to the other Asian powerhouse: China. Both countries are rearming, but if one looks carefully at their diplomacy, they are interested in two things: (1) getting things done and (2) producing things. The sweeping nature of the agreements already in progress in the aftermath of Mr. Putin’s visit last December to Japan, and Mr. Abe’s recent visit to Russia, are testament enough of the recent effectiveness both of Russian and of Japanese diplomacy, and I strongly suspect that it is the fact that both governments and their leaders understand and respect the soft power of culture, and the absolute necessity of preserving it, no matter what the nutty Gramscian progressivists and Mr. Globaloney might say in their perpetual use of shaming tactics.

With that in mind, think of the “national brand” of the United States…

See you on the flip side…

Read More At: GizaDeathStar.com
________________________________________________

About Dr. Joseph P. Farrell

Joseph P. Farrell has a doctorate in patristics from the University of Oxford, and pursues research in physics, alternative history and science, and “strange stuff”. His book The Giza DeathStar, for which the Giza Community is named, was published in the spring of 2002, and was his first venture into “alternative history and science”.

Fukushima & That Russo-Japanese Cooperation


Source: GizaDeathStar.com
Dr. Joseph P. Farrell Ph.D.
May 2, 2017

If you’ve been watching the fallout from the Russo-Japanese Onshen summit last December, some of this news won’t surprise you. Consider the following articles shared by Mr. S.D.:

Japan pursues currency swaps with ASEAN members

BusinessTrends Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ Mail April 27, 2017 3:55 am JST Japan banks to test blockchain-based money transfer

Of course, we’re told the usual story about why Japan would want to negotiate bi-lateral currency arrangements with other Asian nations: it’s all to stop the spread of the Chinese Yuan as a regional (and eventual global) reserve currency. But at the same time it’s experimenting with blockchain technology. By now regular readers here know my thoughts on “digital currencies” and the pressure from Mr. Globaloney to move to a cashless system: no digital system is 100% secure, and yes, I suspect that eventually people will figure out a way through quantum encryption as well. These heresies uttered, the bi-lateral currency story should be read, in my opinion, the same way Mr. Abe’s rearmament should be read: it’s a long term hedge against the increasingly erratic and nutty policies of Empire America, Inc., and thus, while Tokyo is mouthing continued support of Washington, it realizes in the long term that it can no longer count on Washington.

In the process, Japan is remaking the geopolitics of the Western Pacific.

But there was another story that I wanted to include here, and it’s the main focus today; the rest is, so to speak, the context in which to read it. This article was shared by Mr J.S., and it’s hugely important:

Must he do everything? Putin offers to help clean up Japan’s Fukushima

This brings me to my very high octane speculation of the day, for there’s an entirely different context for Japanese rearmament. As regular readers here may also know, I have long regarded Japan (and Germany) as being “turn the screw” nuclear and thermonuclear powers, i.e., as nations that could (and probably have) manufacture all the parts for nuclear and thermonuclear weapons and delivery systems, and simply assemble them quickly – turn the screw – in case of an emergency. As regular readers here may also recall, when the Fukushima disaster occurred, there were those in Japan who suspected – correctly in my opinion – that the disaster may not have been merely an act of nature, for it occurred in an interesting political context: a new government had taken power, and that new government was intent on mending relations with China. That new government was also serious about shutting down the American Empire’s base on Okinawa, long a sore spot in post-war Japanese-American relations. There was talk of state visits of the Japanese Emperor to Beijing. The then US Secretary of Defense, Mr. Robert Gates, issued a statement about these developments that could only be interpreted as a direct threat to the Japanese government. Then, the earthquake and the tsunami. Many Japanese suspected then that the entire incident was deliberate. I maintain that strong suspicion to this day. In the aftermath of Fukushima, there were also a number of articles that revealed that the Japanese may have been conducting a covert nuclear weapons program. Japanese researchers pointed out the peculiar alignment of the earthquake with political events, and the rise of Mr. Abe’s government. Similarly, former assistance secretary of Housing and Urban Development, Catherine Austin Fitts, has pointed out the Indonesian tsunami occurred after a week of inexplicable trades in Indonesian sovereign securities.

In any case, it is in the wake of Fukushima that Mr. Abe has pursued his rearmament plans, setting aside for the first time in postwar history the “percentage cap” on defense spending that was written into the Japanese constitution. This factor has always influenced my thinking that the Fukushima disaster – an ongoing disaster, let us remember – was not merely an act of nature. If anything, it was more like an act of war, with rearmament being Japan’s response. This of course is not a reading of the events that most people – and particularly the corporate controlled media – will accept. Nonetheless, it is the reading and understanding I’ve always used to interpret these events; for me, these events are to be viewed whole: Mr. Gates’ threatening remarks to Japan, Fukushima, and Mr. Abe’s rearmament. And now, we can add Bi-lateral currency agreements to that list.

Which brings us, at last, to today’s high octane speculation about that last article. I want to draw attention to the opening two paragraphs of this rather short, but highly important article:

On Thursday, 27 April, Russian President Vladimir Putin met with Japanese Prime Minister, Shinzo Abe, in Moscow. A myriad of topics were discussed as part of the talks, many of which had to do with increased Japanese investments into Russia and Russia’s ability to provide Japan with its energy supplies. “Peaceful atomic energy” featured as a possible solution to Japan’s energy needs.

On this basis, Vladimir Putin offered to help clean up the destroyed Fukushima nuclear plant, “with the most modern technology available.”  (Bold emphasis added, italicized emphasis in the original)

This raises two prospects to my mind.

Prospect (High Octane Speculation) number 1:”

When the Chernobyl nuclear disaster occurred, the Soviet Union was in its last long decline; Mikhail Gorbachev was trying desperately to revitalize the system and to head off an economic collapse. Chernobyl occurred and many Russians heroically and sacrificially gave their lives to prevent the disaster from becoming even worse than it was. But Chernobyl also occurred in another unusual political context, one which I’ve also found to have the vague hint of the odor of Fukushima about it, for as the Soviet Union was in its death throes, there were a number of large earthquakes just prior to the final dissolution of the Warsaw pact and the reunification of Germany. One of these occurred in earthquake-prone Georgia, home of the then Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard Shevardnadze. At the time I wondered – as some Japanese did after Fukushima – if the Soviet Union had been hit with earthquake weapons.

Assume, for the sake of today’s high octane speculation, that it was. If so, then  by talking about Fukushima, then perhaps Japan and Russia are “comparing notes” and “suspicions”. If so, then this means they could also be discussing – very secretly of course – the means, techniques, and technologies for identifying the use of such weapons.

Prospect (High Octane Speculation) number 2:

Note the final statement that Mr. Putin is offering to help Japan clean up the Fukushima plant “with the most modern technology available.” This implies that the Russians may have developed technologies for nuclear accidents, most likely as a result of the Chernobyl disaster. In this respect, it’s worth recalling that Lt. Col. (US Army, Ret) Tom Bearden has long maintained that the Soviets developed an entirely different technology for the treatment of radioactivity. There have been videos of technologies that alter the rates and degree of radioactive decay (yes, even on ABC’s Good Morning America, years ago). The point here is that Russia may have some technological advantage that is not entirely public record.

And in the context of a North Korean problem, they’re offering to share it with Japan, and to help clean up Fukushima.

And if all this high octane speculation is true – and it’s a mighty big “if” – then there was just another quiet geopolitical earthquake in the Western Pacific.

See you on the flip side…
Read More At: GizaDeathStar.com
________________________________________________

About Dr. Joseph P. Farrell

Joseph P. Farrell has a doctorate in patristics from the University of Oxford, and pursues research in physics, alternative history and science, and “strange stuff”. His book The Giza DeathStar, for which the Giza Community is named, was published in the spring of 2002, and was his first venture into “alternative history and science”.

Russia, Japan & The Kurils: Moving Forward

Source: GizaDeathStar.com
Dr. Joseph P. Farrell Ph.D.
April 30, 2017

Last December Russian Federation President Vladimir Putin, and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, met in Japan for the Onshen summit. It was, by any viewpoint, a significant meeting. It was the first visit by a Russian head of state and government to the island empire since the end of World War Two. Indeed, the two countries are still, technically, at war, since no peace treaty has been signed between the two countries. It was, notably, not technically a state visit, since Mr. Putin and the Japanese Emperor did not meet. It was, so to speak, all business.

The sticking point for a peace treaty has been the Russian occupation of the Kuril islands.  But Abe and Putin did something quite unique: the tabled all discussion of the political status for the Kurils in order to reach a novel economic and geopolitical approach: Russia needs Japanese finance and investment in its ambitious plans to develop Siberia, and it needs Japan to offset growing Chinese influence in Siberia. Japan, for its part, needs a more secure supply of energy, and Siberia, close to hand, would be a much more secure supply source than hauling tankers through the south China sea from the Middle East.

That at least, was my view last December, and it remains my view now. In those talks, what began to emerge was the use of the Kuril Islands as the economic zone that would be the lynchpin for this Russo-Japanese cooperation.

Now that development seems to be moving ahead in reality: it’s no longer merely a matter of discussion between Mr. Abe and Mr. Putin, but is moving into the detailed planning stage according to this article from Russia’s TASS:

Tokyo to draw up cooperation plans for South Kurils and heed locals’ opinions

There’s much food for thought and high octane speculation here, but I want to focus on these statements:

Japan’s government is going to draw up proposals on joint economic activities in the South Kuril Islands, while taking into consideration the views of the Russians who live there, stated Japan’s Minister of Economy, Trade and Industry, Hiroshige Seko in an exclusive interview with TASS.

He will accompany Prime Minister of Japan, Shinzo Abe, during his talks with the Russian President Vladimir Putin scheduled for April 27.

Within the Council of Ministers, Hiroshige Seko is responsible for economic cooperation with Russia.

“Last December, he mentioned, the two leaders met in Japan and agreed to start consultations on possible cooperation in fishing, sea farming, tourism, healthcare and other fields within the framework of the ‘special system’ for the four Northern islands. In Japan, a special Council for Joint Economic Activity has been created to implement the agreement and I have been appointed its Chief Deputy. Now the ministers and bodies involved, are working to set out certain plans. I think we will be able to develop mutually beneficial projects if we efficiently use the potential of the islands, a territory with rich natural resources and geographic layout, and if we take the opinions of locals into consideration.”

Lest one think this is all “wishful thinking” on Japan’s part, the TASS article concludes this way: “This March, the two countries’ deputy ministers held the first consultations in Tokyo on joint economic activities for the South Kuril Islands. The two sides exchanged their proposals, and it is likely that the issue will be finalized during the upcoming meeting on April 27 between the leaders of Russia and Japan. Prime Minister Abe is putting forward the idea of carrying out cooperation projects in the South Kuril Islands within the framework of the ‘special system’ so as not to contravene the legal stances of the countries regarding the status of these territories.” (emphases added)

In other words, the signals that were sent during the Onshen summit now appear to be close to finalization: Japan appears to be willing, for the foreseeable future, to drop the legal status of the Kurils in return for a joint Russo-Japanese “trade zone” consisting of the islands. In other words, the Russian and Japanese negotiating teams have worked out the details for such an arrangement and are close to a formal agreement.

So what’s the high octane speculation here? With North Korea’s always kooky leadership looking increasingly unstable, and America’s ability to deal with it looking increasingly feeble – after all, we’ve been dealing with it since the Clinton administration, and nothing has changed – Tokyo is in my opinion increasingly skeptical in private about the viability of its alliance with the American empire. As I indicated during the Onshen summit, and in several interviews, Tokyo will continue to mouth public support for that alliance, and to insist that nothing will ever change. But as I’ve also indicated, Japanese rearmament is as much about its skepticism of America as it is about “making its contribution to the security of the Pacific rim.” Hence, it needs Russia, and Russian energy, as much as Russia needs Japan, and Japanese technology, engineering, and finance.
The Kurils are to be the “trial cooperation zone” and to function as the gateway for that two-way flow of goods, expertise, services, and energy. Make no mistake, this is a long term development and relationship that is emerging between the two countries, and it will change the balance of power in the Pacific. But there is something else that might be in the making, and it is really high octane speculation, but it’s worth mentioning since it would seem to fit a broader pattern: these types of economic agreements and “bi-lateral agreements” have become the modus operandi of the Shanghai Cooperation organization, otherwise known as the BRICSA bloc. And with such bilateral agreements have come something else: agreements between various Shanghai member states to trade directly in their respective national currencies and to by-pass the dollar. Indeed, India and Iran signed such a memorandum of understanding, and this, I strongly suspect, is one reason Washington has pressured India to move to a cashless system and to withdraw large denomination rupee notes. One cannot trade with Iran in Rupees, if there are no rupees to trade.
I suspect, eventually, that as the Kuril economic cooperation zone expands and trade between Russia and Japan grows, that those countries might decide to move to a similar bi-lateral currency and clearing arrangement, by-passing the dollar. If that happens, then that long term relationship will have become a strategic one. It won’t happen immediately, or overnight, nor before Mr. Abe finishes his rearmament plans.
But, I strongly suspect it will eventually happen.
See you on the flip side…

Read More At: GizaDeathStar.com
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About Dr. Joseph P. Farrell

Joseph P. Farrell has a doctorate in patristics from the University of Oxford, and pursues research in physics, alternative history and science, and “strange stuff”. His book The Giza DeathStar, for which the Giza Community is named, was published in the spring of 2002, and was his first venture into “alternative history and science”.

News & Views From The Nefarium – Dr. Farrell Speaks About The Implications Of The North Korean Missile Test Over Japan

Source: GizaDeathStarCommunity
Dr. Joseph P. Farrell Ph.D.
March 30, 2017

Remember those North Korean missile tests over Japan just a few days ago? Good… but you may not have heard about Japan’s response. It was short, and to the point…