Those Who Inspire Me

Inspiration
TheBreakaway
Zy Marquiez
March 9, 2017

“Man cannot discover new oceans unless he has the courage to lose sight of the shore.”
– Andre Gide

“Our greatest glory is in never falling, but in rising every time we fall.”
– Confucius

Inspiration can come from many places.  For me, inspiration comes in large part by the following:

Individuals who read books every single day inspire me.

The individuals who are relentless in seeking truth, no matter where it leads to or who it implicates, have always and will always inspire me.

The individuals who seek to better themselves, every single day.  Because not doing so is just not living up to your fullest potential.  These individuals inspire me.

Those who seek more than shallow relationships that wither away as quickly as they come, inspire me.

Individuals, who are willing to put their well-being on the line for others, always inspire me.

Those who stand for what is right, even when they stand alone, always inspire me.

Individuals who seek to educate themselves every single day, knowing that life IS education, and education IS life, inspire me.

Individuals who are respectful, kind, honest, will always inspire me.

Individuals who are people of character always inspire me.

Individuals who seek to inspire others in myriad ways inspire me.

Individuals that help others, even if it cost them time, money, or health, always inspire me.

In like fashion, Individuals, who seek to help others, no matter their race, their creed, religion or beliefs, will always inspire me.

Individuals that aren’t afraid to question society-imposed assumptions and beliefs, knowing that we’re lied to on a regular basis, will always inspire me.

Individuals who are willing to listen to others regardless of their differences, without carrying out ad hominem attacks, like children, will always inspire me.

Individuals that have every reason to complain, but instead channel their energy into spawning change will always inspire me.

Individuals that respect themselves enough to take care of their health, and be proactive about it will always inspire me.

Individuals who have walked through the proverbial fire, and found they are immune to the flames will always inspire me.

Individuals that realize life is not a box to rigidly fit into, but an endless canvas of creation upon which endless possibilities exist, and aren’t afraid to follow their dreams, inspire me.

Individuals who challenge others to be their best selves inspire me.

Individuals who know they’ve been taught to buy propaganda, but see right through the veil of lies and seek the truth beyond their comfort zones inspire me.

Individuals who aren’t averse to learning on their own what THEY think is important, and not what society tells them inspire me.

Individuals that will follow the crow when its right, but challenge the crowd when they’re wrong, always inspire me.

Individuals who do not buy into the divide and conquer left right paradigm designed to fracture society into a million shards inspire me.

And individuals who aren’t afraid to employ imagination and curiosity in search for their creative consciousness always inspire me.

Who inspires YOU?

Breakaway Ruminations #3 – The Power Of Curiosity

imagination7
TheBreakaway
Zy Marquiez
January 26, 2017

“The first and simplest emotion which we discover in the human mind, is curiosity.”
– Edmund Burke

” People function better when they’re engaged and curious.”
– Tom Dotz & Tom Hoobyar, NLP – The Essential Guide

“The important thing is not to stop questioning.  Curiosity has its own reason for existing.”
– Albert Einstein

For the individual, curiosity is indispensable.  Without curiosity, the individual finds itself without the compass through which they would plot their journey in life.

In life, curiosity serves multiple purposes.  Curiosity is the path through which we achieve truth, but also the path where we unleash imagination.  Ultimately, one cannot strive for truth, if one cannot search for it.  And one cannot search for truth, if one is not inherently curious.  Conversely, imagination, on the other hand, cannot be employed if one’s intrinsic curiosity is dull at bay.  How can one imagine, if one cannot wonder?  How can one wonder, if one is not curious?

This is why it’s imperative to foster curiosity at every turn, for it will yield amazing results.

Who better to learn about being curious, then children?

Children are amazing beings; they always wonder what’s possible.

If you spend enough time around them you will notice children will do the most random, unexpected, delightful, or at times downright bewildering things.

However, it’s reasonable to argue that most persistent thing a child will do when they reach that age is to ask why.  This is because questions, to children, are natural.  They cannot know the world without inquiring; they inherently realize this.  How else can one attain knowledge, but by figuring things out?  How else can one attain knowledge, but by employing curiosity?

Curiosity is to questioning, as clues are to solving crimes.

Every person that has interacted at length with a child will eventually run into questions of all types.

[Sidebar]In fact, not long ago, got into a very mindful and lengthy conversation with my friend’s daughter who was 11 or so.  This young kid had more curiosity than any other adult that has interacted with me for a long time.  It was rapid fire consistent questioning that you never get in adult life, and not aimless either.  There was purpose.  Every question built on the previous one; everything was as precise as it could be.  It was quite refreshing.  It’s a pity most people seem to merely have the facsimile of curiosity, rather than the actual trait.[End Sidebar]

But overtime, this type of passion for questioning changes and nigh doesn’t exist in adulthood.

As adults, many tend to live life within the lines, never seeking life, or answers beyond societal-imposed boundaries.    Adults, or even adolescents for that manner, tend to have a different type of curiosity – a downgraded type of curiosity.  Adults tend to settle for the superficial answer.  And what’s worse, superficial answers barely even scratch the surface, and by their very nature are unable to get to the heart of issues.

Children, on the other hand, employ curiosity like precisely aimed arrows, which is their attempt to ascertain the world around them.  Moreover, just because they hit bullseyes doesn’t mean they will quit either.  If anything, they get more courageous, as if someone just told them there’s no limit to the amount of sugar they can have.

Children’s relentlessness for knowledge coupled with focused inquisitiveness helps hone the type of curiosity that gets to the heart of the matter.

Why is this?

In How To Read A Book [Review Here], Mortimer J. Adler & Charles Van Doren speak about very issue:

“The child is a natural questioner.  It is not the number of questions he asks but their character that distinguishes him from the adult.  Adults do not lose the curiosity that seems to be a native trait, but their curiosity deteriorates in quality.  They want to know whether something is so, not why.  But children’s questions are not limited to the sort that can be answered by an encyclopedia.”[1][Bold Emphasis Added]

Children, like detectives, will not be stopped until they achieve the answers they seek.

However, although children are inherently curious, by adulthood, that curiosity has morphed into something else, something more static and less malleable.  Why such a change?

Part of this is the stamping out of imagination from public schooling, and part of it is propaganda.  How can propaganda play a part?  Ponder, haven’t we all heard, “Curiosity killed the cat”?  If that’s not propaganda, nothing is.  It’s a statement made to slam down curiosity, as if it’s a gnat to get rid of in one swift blow.  Translation: don’t ask that, don’t’ do that, don’t’ go there.  One might as well say, “Live within that box, and don’t dare move beyond it.”  It’s emblematic of living in fear, except it chains curiosity to the box.

Unfortunately, corralling curiosity can have detrimental side effects.  Without curiosity, individual learning within the boundaries of the world gets stultified, and we settle for ready-made answers [provided by others, rather than arrived through by personal insight] rather than journeying through the mysterious, and adventuring through life in search of the unknown.

And it is within the unknown that the lessons of life reside.

Philosopher Peter Kreeft, in his introduction to Philosophy via Plato’s Apology, writes in his Philosophy 101 by Socrates, and encapsulates the above issue best:

“…Socrates loves the unknown rather than fearing it.  That is almost the definition, the essence of a good learner.  Children who at an early age are punished for exploring the unknown will find it hard later to trust their own curiosity and will prefer the safety of the known, like scared rabbits afraid to come out of their comfortable holes.  Children who have been encouraged to question and explore the unknown are reward for doing so, will make good students, make many discoveries, and be happy doing so. The unknown is to them not like poison but like food.”[2][Bold Emphasis Added]

The unknown shouldn’t be feared.  In fact, it should be welcomed.  It’s an opportunity for growth; an opportunity to test knowledge, character, insight.

Moreover, a child’s inherent curiosity – or for that matter, everyone’s curiosity – should be encouraged constantly.  How else is an individual to foster creativity, and help imagination bloom if without not curiosity?

And even though children can at times go a little overboard with questions, questions still remains the best avenue for curiosity to be employed, which undoubtedly leads to finding the truth, which is what questions are about.

Regarding this, in The Imaginative Argument [review here], Frank L. Cioffi states the following:

“A very fundamental human act undergirds and empowers this activity of arguing for truth.  It’s one that you see in children all the time, one that might even be annoying: the relentless asking of questions.  Just as a child might ask again and again, “why?” until the parent finally shushes him or her with a “Because that’s the way it works,” or “Just because.  Now leave me alone!” so you as thinkers and writers should be asking question upon question…You should ask questions that will help you understand, assess, contextualize, make sense of a given situation, a given idea, text, or topic.  And these questions should reach outward – “What do others say?” – at the same time that they should delve within: “How do I feel about this?”  Questioning allows you to open yourself to possibilities – an action that characterizes genuinely creative thought.”[3][Bold & Underline Emphasis Added]

When one ruminates about it, when children question, they are little philosophers, for they seek the truth.

Perhaps, just perhaps, the questions children ask, are vitally more important than what most realize.

In fact, the questions children ask – that stem from the curiosity children feature – are not as far-fetched and unimportant as they may seem at first blush.

In fact, Mortimer J. Adler and Charles Van Doren even go as far as comparing the questions children ask to great philosophical books:

“…we do want to recognize that one of the most remarkable things about the great philosophical books is that they ask the same sort of profound questions that children askThe ability to retain the child’s view of the world, with at the same time a mature understanding of what it means to retain is, is extremely rare – and a person who has these qualities is likely to be able to contribute something really important to our thinking.

“We are not required to think as children in order to understand existence.  Children certainly do not, and cannot, understand it – if, indeed, anyone can.  But we must be able to see as children see, to wonder as they wonder, to ask as they ask.  The complexities of adult life get in the way of the truth.  The great philosophers have always been able to clear away the complexities and see simple distinctions – simple once they are stated, vastly difficult beforeIf we are to follow them we too must be childishly simple in our question – and maturely wise in our replies.”[4][Bold & Underline Emphasis Added]

Thus, in the child-like simplicity of asking questions one may embark on a voyage of curiosity that might contribute something phenomenal to our understanding.  How else is an individual, be they a child or an adult, going to breakaway from the conventional stultification of life and gravitate towards something more intriguing, and more profound?

Knowing this we must be constant in our resolve, and impervious in our creative thoughts as we foster curiosity.

Then, and only then, do we have any chance to arrive at the answers that could truly change your life.

Perhaps, just perhaps, next time we talk to a child or have a genuine conversation with an adult we could remember that the next question you’re asked might just teach you something you’ve never known before.

An 11-year-old’s curiosity changed my life.  When the last time a child’s curiosity – or anyone’s curiosity for that matter – changed yours?

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Sources & References:

[1] Mortimer J. Adler & Charles Van Doren, How To Read A Book, pg. 264.
[2] Peter Kreeft, Philosophy 101 by Socrates, pg. 54.
[3] Frank L. Cioffi, The Imaginative Argument, pg. xvi.
[4] Mortimer J. Adler & Charles Van Doren, How To Read A Book, pg. 265.

Galactic Control, Science Fiction & The Individual

BreakAway3

Source:NoMoreFakeNews.com
Jon Rappoport
November 30, 2016

I cannot tell you how many times I have seen individuals achieve success through their own efforts, their own determination, their own commitment, their own intelligence, their own creative power—only to turn around and say:

“From my new position, my new point of view, I see what all of us together should do to usher in a better world…”

And in that superficially agreeable statement, they are implicitly denying the right to other individuals to achieve their own success.

They are slamming the door shut.

They are—having climbed the mountain—denying the mountain to others.

And with that brief introduction, here we go—

“Try looking at the world as a giant three-volume science fiction novel. Organizations of stupefying complexity rule the scene. There is an upside to this. You can gain a much deeper understanding of the archetype of the Rebel against the system.” (The Underground, Jon Rappoport)

“What’s that you said? ‘We gave away our power?’ We? What ‘we’ is that? Did I miss a big meeting in the desert where we all got together and gave it away? Who are you anyway? A PR man for the Syndicate? There is no ‘we.’ Not until there’s an ‘I.’ Didn’t you learn that in Depro 101? Search this man. He’s either a dupe or an agent.” (Colossus Fortune, Jon Rappoport)

I’ve been chipping away and drilling the rock of Globalism for some years now.

Medically caused death and destruction. Toxic drugs. Toxic vaccines. Genetically modified food plants and their poisonous pesticides. International trade treaties. Manufactured unemployment. The pseudoscience of psychiatry. Political and media dupes. The art of group propaganda. Indoctrination and lowered IQ through education. Television mind control. Banking. Wall Street. Technocracy. And dozens more subjects.

The carrier of the Globalist world was chosen at the end of World War 2. It already existed, of course. But now it was seen as the prime instrument:

The mega-corporation.

Control of land, resources, labor. No other type of organization would be as efficient at mounting this operation.

Wars for the corporation. Population control for the corporation. Judiciaries for the corporation.

Language for the corporation. Streamlined stripped-down language for minds wedded to the corporation. Reduced minds.

And hundreds of millions, even billions of people stimulated and programmed to return to old fundamentalist religious and ethnic ideologies. If that wasn’t enough, syrupy New Age religions entered the scene.

Back far enough away from this Globalist world, and you’re looking at science fiction made real.

Philip K Dick: “Because today we live in a society in which spurious realities are manufactured by the media, by governments, by big corporations, by religious groups, political groups…So I ask, in my writing, What is real? Because unceasingly we are bombarded with pseudo-realities manufactured by very sophisticated people using very sophisticated electronic mechanisms…it is an astonishing power: that of creating whole universes, universes of the mind. I ought to know. I do the same thing.”

In this Globalist world, the individual is considered to be a cipher, a person without status or meaning. It is the mass, the group that counts.

The notion that the individual, within himself, has the power to affect the course of events seems absurd.

Yet it is exactly this juxtaposition that can give birth to extraordinary and unforeseen possibilities. The juxtaposition of: the rebel against the colossus.

The journey to discover one’s own authentic power is what is called for.

In 1974, Frank Herbert, the author of Dune, wrote this: “The current utopian ideal being touted by people as politically diverse (on the surface, but not underneath) as President Richard M. Nixon and Senator Edward M. Kennedy goes as follows — no deeds of passion allowed, no geniuses, no criminals, no imaginative creators of the new. Satisfaction may be gained only in carefully limited social interactions, in living off the great works of the past. There must be limits to any excitement. Drug yourself into a placid ‘norm.’ Moderation is the key word…”

The “utopian ideal” is sameness. It is promoted. It is propagandized. It is bought and sold. Therefore, underneath that illusion, what lives? That is the question. What exists below and behind this enormous sales pitch?

The individual and his power.

This is dormant force that, even at this late date in history, remains to be explored.

Part of that exploration is weeding out and disposing of cynical philosophical exploitations such as: “all power is evil.”

“All power=corruption.”

Power is not inherently the same thing as crime. Power is not the same thing as rule by force. Power is not the same thing as control of populations.

Not when you’re talking about the voyage of the individual as he discovers what is within himself.

I keep saying that, and I’ll keep on saying it.

See the planet as a “galactic” syndicate and you begin to see the real terms of the situation. The individual has been edged out, marginalized, co-opted into the structure whenever possible. The individual has been left in the darkness, as if he is a vestigial and extinct prop from an earlier period on the evolutionary tree.

Good. So be it.

It clarifies things.

The utopian ideal of Globalism is not only an illusion and a deception, it’s an impossibility—which is to say, all projections of a uniform society based on a group-outcome, in which we agree on an image of what we strive for…there is no freedom in that. There is no actual harmony in that. There is no passion in that.

The society to hope for and work for is an open one. And that means individuals, self-empowered, imagine and independently invent their greatest multiple futures and realities simultaneously.

And for that to happen, individuals have to discover what their own power is.

And then there can be authentic cooperation and community.

Let me put it this way. The Globalists are painting a gigantic mural, which they call Reality. They want us to look at it, be hypnotized by it, and walk into it, to take up residence there.

The notion that we can reject this mural and instead paint ONE NEW ONE together…is completely absurd.

That would be just another substitute, another version of slavery—in this case, self-imposed.

Freedom is not uniformity. It never was.

The overthrow of the machine of control eventually comes back to this: how many individuals are awake and alive to their own power, their own power to invent the future they most profoundly desire?

Why expend enormous amounts of energy if…

Continue Reading At: JonRappoport.wordpress.com
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Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free NoMoreFakeNews emails here or his free OutsideTheRealityMachine emails here.

Video Every Drop Out Must Watch

Source: Nick Drossos
November 7, 2016

In this video Nick Drossos opens up a bit about his life and his struggles with ADHD and Dyslexia. Kicked out of high school at 16 and with no degree he shares his life on how he made it. Hoping to inspire and motivate young kids out there to pursue their dreams and believe in themselves.

Who This Blog Is For


“The purpose of life is a life of purpose.”
– Robert Byrne

In fairness to give credit where credit is due, this piece has come to fruition due the work of a person who we value highly.  The name of this researcher/investigator is Jon Rappoport [www.nomorefakenews.com], and he carries out very incisive work in a myriad of fields.  One of his posts, in similar light, inspired this particular piece.

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Let’s preface the body of this piece with who this blog isn’t for.

This blog is not for folks that are lazy by choice and lackadaisical.

This blog is definitely not for people who value conformity in any way shape or form.

This blog is also not for the people who want the easy way out.

This blog is certainly not for folks that just want comfort or want issues sugar coated.

This blog isn’t for folks who don’t practice self-education.

And this blog finally isn’t for people who just want to be told what is best for them. Only the person themselves can ultimately decide what is best for them.

Who is this blog for?

This particular blog is for the masses individuals who want more; the ones who will not be held back on their journey to achieve the pinnacle of their dreams – their true dreams, not the ones prescribed by society.

Are you tired of the cookie cutter answers the establishment has ready-made for every single scenario that props up? Then this blog is for you. Are you searching for answers as to why the world is screwed up and don’t seem to find any semblance of an answer proposed by the comptrollers, then this blog is for you. Have you learned not to trust the mainstream media institutions/corporations that lie to you repeatedly and have taught you to question everything? This blog is for you.

Now let’s take a side road for a bit.

People are often quick to tell you their likes, their dislikes. However, we rarely hear people’s true passions, if those particular dreams go against the grain. This is because some people often criticize everything that doesn’t conform to their reality and personal point of views, which prevents others from opening up to them.

With that in mind, what is it YOU want? What is it you truly want? Are you living the life you wish for? If not, are you at least pushing beyond conventional thought to solve the issues preventing you from attaining/creating your reality/dreams?

Its easy to live the comfortable life – the prescribed life. That tends to get people in a funk. And am in no way implying that anyone reading this blog is settling at all. In fact, if you’re reading this blog you’re probably the vanguard of the tidal wave. You are the type of individual making changes, pushing against the grain, cracking bricks with toothpicks of rebellion that give globalists spinning headaches at night because you are the key to this whole enigma – the free individual.

Individuals that are not bound to the grid in ways corporations love because it nets them untold profits are the ones this blog is for.

It takes true drive/courage to reach out and go beyond your comfort levels and take [or start?] a path seldom followed. This is known to me from experience.

Being the only ship making way for a particular unique bearing, while the entire armada is anchored at the harbor can be quite daunting. It can seem you are not just the tip of the spear, but the entire spear itself. You are your own help, your own protector. Even your very own liberator. But isn’t what life is all about? This is not about doing everything by yourself. But some particular battles rest upon on you, and only you.

In any case, it is you who ultimately has to answer for the choices you have/haven’t made. It is you will have the knack for success when the chance arises, or will learn from failure on your way to knowledge/wisdom before reloading. it is you who has the brass stones to plow forth through the inferno of conformity, dislodging all obstacles in your path and it is certainly you who are responsible for your life at the very end. Why not make it your choice? Your reality? Why not now? Why give others that option?

Striving/creating something greater for yourself takes a lot of drive/imagination. It takes a lot of effort with bucket loads of focused intent that would leave your naysayers in the star dust.

With that said, what can one do?

Encircling yourself with like-minded individuals that will help you to thrive is a start. Narrowing down which path you want to take is a must.   Infuse your life with as many solutions will give you latitude while saturating yourself with imagination will give your possibilities precision.

It is your life. You decide. For better or worse, you always do.

“What you get by achieving your goals is not as important as what you become by achieving your goals.”
– Henry David Thoreau

“A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.”
– Lao Tzu