300 Word Memories #10 – Will Power

Journey
TheBreakaway | BreakawayConciousness
Zy Marquiez
May 19, 2017

“The only impossible journey is the one you never begin”
– Anthony Robbins

“Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn’t do than the ones you did do.  So throw off the bowlines.  Sail away from safe harbor.  Catch the trade wins in your sails.  Explore.  Dream.  Discover.”
– Mark Twain

Five months into the year, everyone seems to have settled in rather well.  Everyone’s going about their lives how they see fit, and going through the motions.  It’s that last part though, ‘going through the motions’, that gets me ruminating.

The first day of this year, as in the first day of every single New Year, is the day where without a shadow of a doubt most people go to the gym by far.  This is in part due to society seeing a ‘new’ year as a new opportunity to begin something anew.  This isn’t bad, per se, but the fact that many people choose to wait for the year to end in order to make changes has often seemed paradoxical to me.  Why not live every day to the fullest?  Why wait for tomorrow, when you can do something today?  Perhaps it’s because we’re accustomed to think tomorrow is always there, and thus the chance is always there.  But tomorrow at times turns into next year, and next year turns into regrets.

That said, after going to the gym for five months, anyone can begin to see the bifurcation between individuals who have the will to achieve their goals, and those that do not.  And given that going to the gym affects health, which is arguably the most important component of someone’s life, it’s regrettable that what many individuals once thought possible to achieve in health has unfortunately gone by the wayside.

Stravaging through life’s journey without purpose and determination, or with less than one is capable of, is definitely living life with a cup nigh empty.  That’s just my contention however, perhaps yours is different.  My intention is not to bedevil any individual, but to get them to ruminate upon their individual potential and to see more possibilities in their path, to get more out of life, to get more out of every moment.  After all, isn’t that what we all want?

If that is the case, and every single one of us wishes to gain more from life, why is it we sell ourselves short many a time?  Each of us will undoubtedly have a different answer, but a sagacious focus on merely exercising their mental faculties in a sound manner would leave any individual better off by.  There in, perhaps, mental obstacles are abrogated in some shape or form, and the individual is free to saunter onto the next leg of their journey to proceed towards their next goal.

The will to act must remain at the vanguard however.   Once an individual’s utmost volition is employed in its most incisive matter, bringing about change will become indelible.  This doesn’t mean there won’t be hard work involved, nor obstacles to overcome, far from it.  The facade of change cannot be overcome without considerable effort, but in the end, by repeatedly pondering on what will galvanize the individual, and following through with keen observations that are coupled with action, individuals stand to gain more than by merely ‘going through the motions’ as mentioned earlier.

Becoming inured to an autopilot mentality and maintaining less than optimal decisions certainly prevents significant change from ensuing.  That is why it is essential to remain relentlessly focused on what our goals are and what we seek to gain from life.  With precise action backing the blueprint of our better life, we then are able to see what we are truly capable of, thus beginning to notice that are potential is far higher than ever pondered upon.

From there, each of the steps builds on its own, each obstacle brings a new lesson, and each pit-stop along life’s journey brings us new adventures.  But significant change can only begin after that special juncture is reached, where that choice is made – that first step onto a new path.  These types of choices, when made from our deepest self, change us resoundingly, deeply and truly.

Not tomorrow, not next year, right now.   The first step is always the hardest, but it begins to path to the greatest growth.

Why not take it now?

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This article is free and open source.  All individuals are encouraged to share this content and have permission to republish this article under a Creative Commons license with attribution to Zy Marquiez and TheBreakaway.wordpress.com.
___________________________________________________________
About The Author:

Zy Marquiez is an avid book reviewer, researcher, an open-minded skeptic, yogi, humanitarian, and freelance writer who studies and mirrors regularly subjects like Consciousness, Education, Creativity, The Individual, Ancient History & Ancient Civilizations, Forbidden Archaeology, Big Pharma, Alternative Health, Space, Geoengineering, Social Engineering, Propaganda, and much more.

His other blog, BreakawayConsciousnessBlog.wordpress.com features mainly his personal work, while TheBreakaway.wordpress.com serves as a media portal which mirrors vital information nigh always ignored by mainstream press, but still highly crucial to our individual understanding of various facets of the world.

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Book Review: The War Of Art – Break Through The Blocks & Win Your Inner Creative Battles by Steven Pressfield

TheWarOfArt
TheBreakaway | BreakawayConciousness
Zy Marquiez
April 11, 2017

The War Of Art – Break Through The Blocks & Win Your Inner Creative Battles by Steven Pressfield is a very innovative way to look at the resistance individuals face when attempting to walk the path of a creatively conscious life.

Because resistance is something that we all face in one way shape or form [i.e. procrastination], this book is a book that stands to help everyone in their own unique way.

Pressfield minces no words in his apt definition of what holds creative individuals back:  Resistance.

Resistance is what leaves most of us feeling like abject failures after we’ve lost multiple bouts with it.  The paradox of this conundrum is that Resistance isn’t as untouchable as it might seem at first blush.  Yes, Resistance is the paradise of procrastination on the creative path, it is the ultimate obstacle, the veritable Darth Vader.   As such, resistance is the epitome of self-sabotage.  But, therein lies the key to this curious conundrum: self.

Maraudering deep within our darkest realm, Resistance is the ultimate enemy which seeks to slay every one of our hopes, and cast limitations into each and every one of our dreams.

As Pressfield points out:

“Resistance is a bully.  Resistance has no strength of its own; it’s power derives entirely from our fear of it.  A bully will back down before the runtiest twerp who stands his ground.”[1]

In other words, if the percipient individual – guided by the self – is to overcome this ruthless opponent, they need to face it head on.  As the saying goes, fear is False Evidence Appearing Real.  Like the ego, it only grows when you feed it, so cutting Resistance of at the pass is crucial.  And this is where this book shines.

The War of Art is split into 3 parts.  In Part One, Pressfield shows a plethora of ways in which Resistance can be better understood.  Thereafter, Book Two features ways that the individual can tackle resistance in myriad ways, while Book Three goes beyond into deeper ruminations on invoking the ever-elusive Muse.  He also covers what separates amateurs from professionals, and an unorthodox – but refreshing – look at the artist and how the artist fits into the grand scheme of things.  The book yields more, but those are the core concepts.

As the author aptly notes, if Resistance couldn’t be overcome, the great works that humanity has wouldn’t be available these days.

If you are an individual who runs head on into Resistance daily – and who doesn’t? – or needs a healthy dose of inspiration, this book will definitely help you handle those in spades.  And if you seek to live a more creative life, whether by hobby or profession, then this is a must read.

Pressfield’s unorthodox approach to invoking the Muse is a breath of fresh air, and one that we can all relate too.  In his own words:

“When we sit down each day and do our work, power concentrates around us. The Muse takes note of our dedication.  She approves.  We have earned favor in her sight.  When we sit down and work, we become like a magnetized rod that attracts iron filings.  Ideas come.  Insights accrete.

“Just as Resistance has its seat in hell, so Creation has its home in heaven.  And it’s not just a witness, but an eager and creative ally.”[2]

After reading the book, my only regret was that the book was not longer.  That’s the sign of a good book.

If you want an active ally to accompany you in your personal battleground against Resistance and need a spark to light the tinder of action, get this book.
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Source:

[1] Steven Pressfield, The War Of Art, p. 99.
[2] Ibid., p. 108

___________________________________________________________
This article is free and open source. You are encouraged and have permission to republish this article under a Creative Commons license with attribution to Zy Marquiez and TheBreakaway.wordpress.com.
___________________________________________________________
About The Author:

Zy Marquiez is an avid book reviewer, researcher, an open-minded skeptic, yogi, humanitarian, and freelance writer who studies and mirrors regularly subjects like Consciousness, Education, Creativity, The Individual, Ancient History & Ancient Civilizations, Forbidden Archaeology, Big Pharma, Alternative Health, Space, Geoengineering, Social Engineering, Propaganda, and much more.

His own personal blog is BreakawayConsciousnessBlog.wordpress.com where his personal work is shared, while TheBreakaway.wordpress.com serves as a media portal which mirrors vital information usually ignored by mainstream press, but still highly crucial to our individual understanding of various facets of the world.

Those Who Inspire Me

Inspiration
TheBreakaway
Zy Marquiez
March 9, 2017

“Man cannot discover new oceans unless he has the courage to lose sight of the shore.”
– Andre Gide

“Our greatest glory is in never falling, but in rising every time we fall.”
– Confucius

Inspiration can come from many places.  For me, inspiration comes in large part by the following:

Individuals who read books every single day inspire me.

The individuals who are relentless in seeking truth, no matter where it leads to or who it implicates, have always and will always inspire me.

The individuals who seek to better themselves, every single day.  Because not doing so is just not living up to your fullest potential.  These individuals inspire me.

Those who seek more than shallow relationships that wither away as quickly as they come, inspire me.

Individuals, who are willing to put their well-being on the line for others, always inspire me.

Those who stand for what is right, even when they stand alone, always inspire me.

Individuals who seek to educate themselves every single day, knowing that life IS education, and education IS life, inspire me.

Individuals who are respectful, kind, honest, will always inspire me.

Individuals who are people of character always inspire me.

Individuals who seek to inspire others in myriad ways inspire me.

Individuals that help others, even if it cost them time, money, or health, always inspire me.

In like fashion, Individuals, who seek to help others, no matter their race, their creed, religion or beliefs, will always inspire me.

Individuals that aren’t afraid to question society-imposed assumptions and beliefs, knowing that we’re lied to on a regular basis, will always inspire me.

Individuals who are willing to listen to others regardless of their differences, without carrying out ad hominem attacks, like children, will always inspire me.

Individuals that have every reason to complain, but instead channel their energy into spawning change will always inspire me.

Individuals that respect themselves enough to take care of their health, and be proactive about it will always inspire me.

Individuals who have walked through the proverbial fire, and found they are immune to the flames will always inspire me.

Individuals that realize life is not a box to rigidly fit into, but an endless canvas of creation upon which endless possibilities exist, and aren’t afraid to follow their dreams, inspire me.

Individuals who challenge others to be their best selves inspire me.

Individuals who know they’ve been taught to buy propaganda, but see right through the veil of lies and seek the truth beyond their comfort zones inspire me.

Individuals who aren’t averse to learning on their own what THEY think is important, and not what society tells them inspire me.

Individuals that will follow the crow when its right, but challenge the crowd when they’re wrong, always inspire me.

Individuals who do not buy into the divide and conquer left right paradigm designed to fracture society into a million shards inspire me.

And individuals who aren’t afraid to employ imagination and curiosity in search for their creative consciousness always inspire me.

Who inspires YOU?

Breakaway Ruminations #3 – The Power Of Curiosity

imagination7
TheBreakaway
Zy Marquiez
January 26, 2017

“The first and simplest emotion which we discover in the human mind, is curiosity.”
– Edmund Burke

” People function better when they’re engaged and curious.”
– Tom Dotz & Tom Hoobyar, NLP – The Essential Guide

“The important thing is not to stop questioning.  Curiosity has its own reason for existing.”
– Albert Einstein

For the individual, curiosity is indispensable.  Without curiosity, the individual finds itself without the compass through which they would plot their journey in life.

In life, curiosity serves multiple purposes.  Curiosity is the path through which we achieve truth, but also the path where we unleash imagination.  Ultimately, one cannot strive for truth, if one cannot search for it.  And one cannot search for truth, if one is not inherently curious.  Conversely, imagination, on the other hand, cannot be employed if one’s intrinsic curiosity is dull at bay.  How can one imagine, if one cannot wonder?  How can one wonder, if one is not curious?

This is why it’s imperative to foster curiosity at every turn, for it will yield amazing results.

Who better to learn about being curious, then children?

Children are amazing beings; they always wonder what’s possible.

If you spend enough time around them you will notice children will do the most random, unexpected, delightful, or at times downright bewildering things.

However, it’s reasonable to argue that most persistent thing a child will do when they reach that age is to ask why.  This is because questions, to children, are natural.  They cannot know the world without inquiring; they inherently realize this.  How else can one attain knowledge, but by figuring things out?  How else can one attain knowledge, but by employing curiosity?

Curiosity is to questioning, as clues are to solving crimes.

Every person that has interacted at length with a child will eventually run into questions of all types.

In fact, as a quick sidebar, not long ago, got into a very mindful and lengthy conversation with my friend’s daughter who was 11 or so.  This young kid had more curiosity than any other adult that has interacted with me for a long time.  It was rapid fire consistent questioning that you never get in adult life, and not aimless either.  There was incisive purpose to the questions throughout.  Every question built on the previous one; everything was as precise as it could be.  It was quite refreshing.  It’s a pity most people seem to merely have the facsimile of curiosity, rather than the actual trait.

As people grow older, this type of passion for curiosity and questioning is siphoned for many reasons and nigh doesn’t exist in adulthood in rare instances.

As adults, many tend to live life within the lines, never seeking life, or answers beyond societal-imposed boundaries.    Adults, or even adolescents for that manner, tend to have a different type of curiosity – a downgraded type of curiosity.  Adults tend to settle for the superficial answer.  And what’s worse, superficial answers barely even scratch the surface, and by their very nature are unable to get to the heart of issues.

Children, on the other hand, employ curiosity like precisely aimed arrows, which is their attempt to ascertain the world around them.  Moreover, just because they hit bullseyes doesn’t mean they will quit either.  If anything, they get more courageous, as if someone just told them there’s no limit to the amount of sugar they can have.

Children’s relentlessness for knowledge coupled with focused inquisitiveness helps hone the type of curiosity that gets to the heart of the matter.

Why is this?

In How To Read A Book [Review Here], Mortimer J. Adler & Charles Van Doren speak about very issue:

“The child is a natural questioner.  It is not the number of questions he asks but their character that distinguishes him from the adult.  Adults do not lose the curiosity that seems to be a native trait, but their curiosity deteriorates in quality.  They want to know whether something is so, not why.  But children’s questions are not limited to the sort that can be answered by an encyclopedia.”[1][Bold Emphasis Added]

Children, like detectives, will not be stopped until they achieve the answers they seek.

However, although children are inherently curious, by adulthood, that curiosity has morphed into something else, something more static and less malleable.  Why such a change?

Part of this is the stamping out of imagination from public schooling, and part of it is propaganda.  How can propaganda play a part?  Ponder, haven’t we all heard, “Curiosity killed the cat”?  If that’s not propaganda, nothing is.  It’s a statement made to slam down curiosity, as if it’s a gnat to get rid of in one swift blow.  Translation: don’t ask that, don’t’ do that, don’t’ go there.  One might as well say, “Live within that box, and don’t dare move beyond it.”  It’s emblematic of living in fear, except it chains curiosity to the box.

Unfortunately, corralling curiosity can have detrimental side effects.  Without curiosity, individual learning within the boundaries of the world gets stultified, and we settle for ready-made answers [provided by others, rather than arrived through by personal insight] rather than journeying through the mysterious, and adventuring through life in search of the unknown.

And it is within the unknown that the lessons of life reside.

Philosopher Peter Kreeft, in his introduction to Philosophy via Plato’s Apology, writes in his Philosophy 101 by Socrates, and encapsulates the above issue best:

“…Socrates loves the unknown rather than fearing it.  That is almost the definition, the essence of a good learner.  Children who at an early age are punished for exploring the unknown will find it hard later to trust their own curiosity and will prefer the safety of the known, like scared rabbits afraid to come out of their comfortable holes.  Children who have been encouraged to question and explore the unknown are reward for doing so, will make good students, make many discoveries, and be happy doing so. The unknown is to them not like poison but like food.”[2][Bold Emphasis Added]

The unknown shouldn’t be feared.  In fact, it should be welcomed.  It’s an opportunity for growth; an opportunity to test knowledge, character, insight.

Moreover, a child’s inherent curiosity – or for that matter, everyone’s curiosity – should be encouraged constantly.  How else is an individual to foster creativity, and help imagination bloom if without not curiosity?

And even though children can at times go a little overboard with questions, questions still remains the best avenue for curiosity to be employed, which undoubtedly leads to finding the truth, which is what questions are about.

Regarding this, in The Imaginative Argument [review here], Frank L. Cioffi states the following:

“A very fundamental human act undergirds and empowers this activity of arguing for truth.  It’s one that you see in children all the time, one that might even be annoying: the relentless asking of questions.  Just as a child might ask again and again, “why?” until the parent finally shushes him or her with a “Because that’s the way it works,” or “Just because.  Now leave me alone!” so you as thinkers and writers should be asking question upon question…You should ask questions that will help you understand, assess, contextualize, make sense of a given situation, a given idea, text, or topic.  And these questions should reach outward – “What do others say?” – at the same time that they should delve within: “How do I feel about this?”  Questioning allows you to open yourself to possibilities – an action that characterizes genuinely creative thought.”[3][Bold & Underline Emphasis Added]

When one ruminates about it, when children question, they are little philosophers, for they seek the truth.

Perhaps, just perhaps, the questions children ask, are vitally more important than what most realize.

In fact, the questions children ask – that stem from the curiosity children feature – are not as far-fetched and unimportant as they may seem at first blush.

In fact, Mortimer J. Adler and Charles Van Doren even go as far as comparing the questions children ask to great philosophical books:

“…we do want to recognize that one of the most remarkable things about the great philosophical books is that they ask the same sort of profound questions that children askThe ability to retain the child’s view of the world, with at the same time a mature understanding of what it means to retain is, is extremely rare – and a person who has these qualities is likely to be able to contribute something really important to our thinking.

“We are not required to think as children in order to understand existence.  Children certainly do not, and cannot, understand it – if, indeed, anyone can.  But we must be able to see as children see, to wonder as they wonder, to ask as they ask.  The complexities of adult life get in the way of the truth.  The great philosophers have always been able to clear away the complexities and see simple distinctions – simple once they are stated, vastly difficult beforeIf we are to follow them we too must be childishly simple in our question – and maturely wise in our replies.”[4][Bold & Underline Emphasis Added]

Thus, in the child-like simplicity of asking questions one may embark on a voyage of curiosity that might contribute something phenomenal to our understanding.  How else is an individual, be they a child or an adult, going to breakaway from the conventional stultification of life and gravitate towards something more intriguing, and more profound?

Knowing this we must be constant in our resolve, and impervious in our creative thoughts as we foster curiosity.

Then, and only then, do we have any chance to arrive at the answers that could truly change your life.

Perhaps, just perhaps, next time we talk to a child or have a genuine conversation with an adult we could remember that the next question you’re asked might just teach you something you’ve never known before.

An 11-year-old’s curiosity changed my life.  When the last time a child’s curiosity – or anyone’s curiosity for that matter – changed yours?

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Sources & References:

[1] Mortimer J. Adler & Charles Van Doren, How To Read A Book, pg. 264.
[2] Peter Kreeft, Philosophy 101 by Socrates, pg. 54.
[3] Frank L. Cioffi, The Imaginative Argument, pg. xvi.
[4] Mortimer J. Adler & Charles Van Doren, How To Read A Book, pg. 265.