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Think Cancers Are Genetic? Watch This!

Source: iHealthTube.com
July 23, 2016

Some cancers may have a genetic factor to them. But many people think that all cancers have a genetic link to them. In this interview from 2009, Andreas Moritz discusses genetics and whether or not there is a direct link to cancers. Find out what really might be going on and what you can do to protect yourself! Do you think cancers are genetic? Watch this.

[Book Review] Unmasking The Social Engineer – The Human Element Of Security by Christopher Hadnagy

Compulsory Reading For Those Interested In The Intricacies Of Social Engineering & Human Behaviour

SE
TheBreakway
Zy Marquiez
July 11, 2016

“You see, but you do not observe.  The distinction is clear”
– Sherlock Holmes

The Social Engineering topic is a subject that’s as fascinating as its concerning.

Social Engineering is a tool that is used to influence individuals/people to take specific actions.  These actions could be positive or negative depending on the intent of the social engineer.

This topic came of extreme interest to me after reading the book  Tavistock Institute – Social Engineering The Masses by Daniel Estulin.  In that particular book, the author deals with Social Engineering, but at a large scale where it is the goals of institutions to influence cultures/nation states et al, and not in a positive way one might add.

Unmasking The Social Engineer – The Human Element Of Security by Christopher Hadnagy deals with Social Engineering at an individual level, which is greatly appreciated since nigh nobody touches this topic, but its adverse effects are innumerable.

In this particular book the author does an exemplary job of outlining many of the instances and subtle, or no so subtle idiosyncracies that will end up influencing how people feel, one way or another.  If a particular individual is savvy enough, these behaviours will help that individual become a better communicator, and possibly a better person.

On the flip side of that, this particular skillset can also be used for detrimental purposes.  This is why the author notes that its vital for people not only to know how emotions couple with social engineering techniques, but how one can use them for positive and defensive circumstances.

Many people feel a bit recent about there being a book such as this on how to influence people, and rightly so.  The author tackles that concern rather trenchantly:

“We can’t defend properly without knowing how to attack.  If the first time you get punched is your first real fight, it will most likely end badly for you.  That is why people take lessons in how to fight and defend themselves.”[1]

Hadnagy makes it a point of making sure the reader understands that the techniques employed in the book are vital to becoming a better communicator, but more importantly, a better listener, which will inherently increase the quality of life.

Unmasking The Social Engineer is a veritable crashcourse into a kaleidoscope of abilities that are the disposal of people if they realize the effects that can be expected from individuals.  Many of these effects take place through what’s known as amygdala hijacking.

In respect to that, as the author concerningly notes:

“When the emotional processor [the amygdala] kicks into high gear, the logic center processors [neocortex] get almost turned off and blocked.  Adrenaline, hormone levels, and blood pressure rise, and our memories become less efficient.  We begin to lose our ability to communicate effectively, and we turn to a form of autopilot to make decisions.”[2][Bold Emphasis Added]

To add additional grist for the mill, Hadnagy further notes:

“Our brains are hardwired to mirror the emotional content we see from those around us, so it is logical to say that if the social engineer can show mild sadness signs, those signs will trigger empathy in the person they are dealing with.  Once empathy is triggered, and if those social engineer’s words and story create an emotional bond with those words, then the rational and logic centers in the brain shut down momentarilyThis leaves the full processing power of our brain focused on the emotional center, so as a decision is being made based on the request, what is reasonable goes out the window.”[3] [Bold Emphasis Added]

Those facts, along with other salient points, are a large reason of why individuals need to be cognizant when their emotions might be subject to be played like a fiddle.

Another great aspect of this book is that Hadnagy references the work of Dr. Paul Eckman, who has been at the tip of the spear in the area of emotional behaviour and individual idiosyncracies.  Two books that couple well to this book are, Emotions Revealed, and Unmasking The Face.  While these books obviously do not need to be read in order to understand Unmasking The Social Engineer, but they offer extreme depth in this abstruse subject for those interested in delving deeper into this intriguing pool of psychological/physiological data.

The book showcases various components of an individual’s behavior repertoire, and synthesizes it all in an easy to understand matter that’s very pragmatic.

Taking into account the totality and depth of this book, this should not only be compulsory reading for those interested in the intricacies of social engineering, but should be something that everyone should make a point to learn given the vital aspects it plays within safety and communications.

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Sources:

[1] by Christopher Hadnagy, Unmasking The Social Engineer – The Human Element Of Security by Christopher Hadnagy, pg. 204.
[2] Ibid., pg. 166.
[3] Ibid., pg. 173.

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Other Suggested Reading:

Thinking, Fast & Slow by Daniel Kahneman
Mass Control – Engineering Human Consciousness by Jim Keith
Emotions Revealed by Dr. Paul Ekman
Unmasking The Face by Dr. Paul Ekman and Friesen
Snap – Making The Most Of First Impressions, Body Language & Charisma by Patti Wood

Breaking Away From Stress With Meditation


TheBreakway
Zy Marquiez
July 5, 2016

“Meditation is not like doing reps at the gym.  It strengthens your attention muscle.”
– David Levy

“Give me silence.  Let me ponder my despair.  Where the trees and the birds know no cruelty.  And where I may learn to breathe again.  Without the harsh views of humanity.  Without judgment or jury.  Just me, the trees, the green.  And my silence.”
– Amelia Dashwood

Meditation is a tool that is as great and powerful as its precision of use.

A still mind helps employ this tool and its effect will be proportional to the drive the individual employs in its application.

Calming the mind can help:

Better sleep
Clearer focus
Greater effectiveness
Anger control
Ability to learn faster
Stress release
Less distraction
Better concentration
Reduced depression
Enhanced physical relaxation[1]

Michael Singer, in his book The Surrender Experiment, covers many experiences that expanded his consciousness when he became ready to allow things in life to happen, rather than forcing things to manifest in his own manner.  In his intriguing and thought provoking book he writes:

“Challenging situations create the force needed to bring about change.  The problem is that we generally use all the stirred-up energy intended to bring about change to resist change.  I was learning to sit quietly in the midst of the howling winds and wait to see what constructive action was being asked of me.”

This resounding passage helped me change the path of stress that was chosen by me to a more consciously calming road.

Another effect of reading the above passage was that it was as if the stress-balloon popped, and it was quite shocking at first.  This was due to the realization that change was being resisted by me, and that was one major factor causing stress in my life at the time.  Synchronistically enough, it was after that very moment subsequent to reading that particular passage and making the choice to change that everything in my life began snowballing into positive circumstances once it was decided by me to become proactive, rather than reactive.

Such resounding change wasn’t able to take place until my eyes and mind were open to it, and willing to act on it.

In Meditation For Warriors – Practical Medication For Cops, Soldiers & Martial Artists, Loren W. Christensen not only shows many anecdotal evidence by those in the martial field of the benefits of meditation, but he also offers various ways that meditation can be employed.

As the author notes, one army veteran told him:

“There was a soldier in Afghanistan into the Zen/hippie stuff.  He was always meditating, doing yoga, whatever.  Thing is, he always seemed so calm no matter what was going on.  So I asked him to show me how to meditate.  After a while, it started to make a huge difference on how I mentally dealt with stress in combat.”[3]

Christensen’s friend, Paul McRedmond, who was a long-time martial artist, retired police officer, and avid meditator for nigh five decades, related:

“The nervous system can only take so much dynamic input before it crashes/needs to sleep, etc.  It’s like filling a cup with water.  The cup can actually take more water than just the cup’s measure.  But one more drop can cause more water to flow from the cup than just that one drop.  Loren, you’ve dealt with many, many ‘last straw’ [last drop of stress] people.  With them, a seemingly random event, a single word or a glance can cause emotional upset, panic, screaming, and, sometimes, really stupid actions…There are three ways to empty the cup: You can get a bigger one.  You can dump or drain the water in the existing one, or you can avoid water.  Training, relationships, good nutrition, and exercise all enlarge the cup.  Sleep allows some of the water to drain and vacations get you away from the water.

But, meditation does all three at once.  It expands the capacity of your nervous system by creating coherence [a synergistic pattern of brain wave frequencies across the main 4 quadrants of the brain], it allows for greater restfulness during sleep [draining the water], and [here comes the woo-woo stuff] to eventually become water.”[4]

Essentially, meditation impacts the health of the individual through what are called “stress reduction pathways” within your brain.  As Researchers at the Carnegie Mellon University elaborated:

“When an individual experiences stress, activity in the prefrontal cortex — responsible for conscious thinking and planning — decreases, while activity in the amygdala, hypothalamus and anterior cingulate cortex — regions that quickly activate the body’s stress response — increases.

Studies have suggested that mindfulness reverses these patterns during stress; it increases prefrontal activity, which can regulate and turn down the biological stress response.

Excessive activation of the biological stress response increases the risk of diseases impacted by stress (like depression, HIV and heart disease).

By reducing individuals’ experiences of stress, mindfulness may help regulate the physical stress response and ultimately reduce the risk and severity of stress-related diseases.”

There are countless other examples that showcase what individuals in high-stress environments thought of the regular use of using meditation as a tool.  That convinced me, as an individual, that there could probably be some merit to what they spoke of.  And there was.

After learning how to employ meditation, issues that used to bother me, melted away.

Empty/inflammatory comments people made, affected me no longer.

Stressful scenarios that used to be obstacles became puzzles to be solved rather than detriments on my path.

Because of the above reason, and more, meditation has always been a staple in my life, and always will be.

There are many ways stress can be conquered, and these techniques are up to the individual to figure out what helps them best.  In my case, reading, working out & meditating have always worked best, with the last one netting the most benefits by far.

Whatever tool/technique one decides to choose to deal with stress, it’s of utmost importance not only to refine this tool, but to hone it as much as possible for when it is needed.  The beauty of whatever technique/tool you choose, is that the more you employ it, the more efficient you will become with it.  But its benefits will only accrue by being regularly proactive.

Ponder about it, a perfectly honed tool sitting in the attic of your life most of the time does nobody any good.

Please keep in mind, when the next obstacle in your life arises, it’s not to bring you down.  It’s to test you.  It’s to show you what you’re made of.

But nothing great will happen unless you unleash the power of your mind in its full potential.

As Eckhart Tolle intimated:

“Your mind is an instrument, a tool, a weapon.”

The mind, your mind, is your greatest asset.

Be cognizant.

Hone it.

Employ it.

To sum up, the following quote is left for your contemplation:

“The mind can be our best friend and advocate in getting what we want in life, or it can pull the breaks on and be a nasty little foe – the choice is yours – choose your attitude.”
– Rachel Bermingham
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Sources & References

[1] Loren W. Christensen, Meditation For Warriors – Practical Medication For Cops, Soldiers & Martial Artists, pg. 19.
[2]  Dr. Kelly Brogan, M.D., A Mind Of Your Own – The Truth About Depression & How Women Can Heal Their Bodies To Reclaim Their Lives, p. 260.
[3] Loren W. Christensen, Meditation For Warriors – Practical Medication For Cops, Soldiers & Martial Artists, pg. 19.
[4] Ibid., pg. 19-20
[5] [5] EurekAlert!, Carnegie Mellon Researchers Reveal How Mindfulness Training Affects Health, February 12, 2016

[Book] Review – Thinking, Fast & Slow by Daniel Kahneman

TFS
TheBreakaway
Zy Marquiez
June 14, 2016

Thinking, Fast & Slow by Daniel Kahneman is an incisive, academic, cogent, and far-reaching piece of work that should be part of everyone’s library.

Nobel Prize winning Kahneman unleashes a foray into the domain of decision-making, psychology &  problem-solving unlike nothing ever seen within this discipline previously.  Kahneman is the individual responsible as to why the subject of Behavioral Economics has grown as fast as its grown for quite some time.

Kahneman meticulously tackles many thought-provoking aspects in psychology with scrupulous scientific rigor.  This book is the author’s magnum opus, without a doubt.

This relentless journey into the domain of the brain leaves no stone unturned, which is why Kahneman work has become unprecedented to economists and others alike.

The author parses his main idea into two sets.  The brain, according to Kahneman, splits things into a binary cognitive system.  This is what the author denotes as System 1, and System 2.

System 1 is automatic, emotive, unconscious, responsible for lightning-quick decisions, whilst System 2 is methodical, incisive, conscious, and orderly.

Each system plays its part in shaping the world in how we see it.  The book tackles nigh every little crevice available to the author in search for the understanding of the above-mentioned systems, its ramifications, and what we can learn do to learn from each.

However, in interest of full disclosure this is not the quickest book to read, even for avid readers unless one is perhaps hyper interested in the subject matter.  The book is also quite repetitive in a few spots.  Then again, some people learn better from rereading things a few times, and from different angles, so take that for whats it worth.

Still, the book is chock-full of intriguing data sets and experiments, and the way in which the concepts are discussed, although overly methodical in certain spots, is definitely worth the read.

Kahneman’s journey into the studies discussed attempts to leave no stone unturned in his bid to shed light into the ideas of the illusion of validity, narrow framing, planning fallacies, regression to the mean, the illusion of understanding, the endowment effect, and much, much more.

Ultimately the book seeks to show us how we can trust ourselves – our brain – better, and how to succeed in understanding the various facets that cognitive behavior goes through.   Coupled with that, Kahneman also makes it a point to give individuals practical ways in which to hone our mental skill and be able to use System 1 and System 2 in a way that benefits us most.

If you are an individual that is serious about the inner workings of the mind, especially in regards to decision making, the book – although lengthy – will keep you busy pondering many seams from which to draw wisdom from.

Applications of MBT with Tom Campbell [Part 4] – Sexuality, Parenting & Emotions

EBTV presents host Evita Ochel (http://www.evitaochel.com) with returning guest Tom Campbell (http://my-big-toe.com) covering practical applications of MBT – My BIG Theory of Everything.

In this part 4 of 5 topics revolve around relationships, sexuality, choosing to have children, overpopulation, parenting and emotions, as they relate to MBT.

Tom is a leading researcher and authority on consciousness, reality and out of body experiences, which he has been studying for over 30 years. He is a physicist, lecturer and author of the My BIG TOE trilogy.

PART 4: Sexuality, Parenting & Emotions

1. A broadened explanation Tom’s advice and information about relationships and roles for men and women within romantic partnerships. (2:50)
– normal and average data versus outlier data
– the importance of understanding the principle at work in Tom’s theory
– the importance of moving from need-based relationships and into love-based relationships
– understanding cultural versus fundamental roles in gender

2. Is a balanced masculine-feminine existence for each being part of our future evolution in relationships? (11:50)
– the natural evolution of “outgrowing” roles and culture within gender
– our future as non-role based

3. How other realities (physical and non-physical) express gender and being. (14:12)
– existence depends on the rule-set of each reality
– gender as role-playing within a virtual reality

4. What is the role of sexuality in the framework of a virtual reality? (17:40)
– sexuality as a result of our rule set
– sex as our natural state of being
– the importance of the intent, rather than the act of sex
– the role of Ego and beliefs within the context of sex

5. How our human sexuality ties into the concept of procreating – having children. (26:18)
– the role of intent and need in choosing to have children
– the role of biological pressure to have children within this rule set

6. Examining the intentions people have to create children (31:30)
– the benefits and advantages of having children with respect to Ego and maturity
– the drawbacks and disadvantages of having children with respect to Ego and maturity

7. How does our Earth population, specifically overpopulation tie into the virtual reality theory? (34:05)
– each being = an individuated consciousness
– the balancing nature of nature and ecology
– examining the downside of artificial population control

8. How to approach parenting in the most conscious, responsible and enlightened way? (39:25)
– the disadvantages of trying to advantage our children
– the risks of left-brain conditioning and processing too early in children
– the importance of natural flow, balance and support in parenting

9. The possible consequences of attempting to bring up children in a very right-brained/intuitive/ “New Age” fashion. (46:50)
– releasing the aspect of control in parenting and trying to make our children turn out a certain way
– the importance of being a good facilitator, not manipulator to children

10. Is there a rule set in terms of how we get paired up with certain spouses, kids, or parents? Is there some evidence that supports the idea of a “soul family”? (50:40)
– the difference of a newer consciousness, versus a more evolved consciousness
– random set ups versus planned set ups
– probability scenarios based on intuition versus logic
– the opportunity for growth in every situation

11. Emotions are good for feedback, as Tom often shares. How can we use our emotions to help guide ourselves through this reality? (58:55)
– the power of our emotions in helping us understand ourselves and our choices
– the dysfunctional model of the conscious and the subconscious
– merging into one being, by releasing fear and belief
– the excuses and compartmentalizations we use to excuse poor behaviours and habits
– how self-denial causes dysfunction within the human being.

Source: EvitaOchel