Book Review: Cosmic War by Dr. Joseph P. Farrell Ph.D.

CW
TheBreakaway
Zy Marquiez
August 18, 2016

Oxford educated researcher Dr. Joseph P. Farrell unleashes a reverberating hypothesis regarding ancient history whose echoes will be forever heard.

Cosmic War – Interplanetary Warfare, Modern Physics & Ancient Texts by Dr. Joseph P Farrell Ph.D. is an extremely intriguing incursion into the possibility of a very ancient war in high antiquity.

Dr. Farrell’s hypotheses of an Ancient Interplanetary War is argued in an in-depth, precise and reasonable approach.  The extensive evidence Farrell collates and synthesizes in this particular book will leave the reader aghast with the possibilities.

Intriguingly enough, many ancient cultures stated that the ‘Wars of the Gods’ were quite real.  Predictably, even though there’s extensive evidence for advanced physics, advanced weapons, ancient [millions and millions of year old artifacts found by reputable sources], the establishment has painted all over ancient history with the brush of ‘myth’.

Regarding this very issue, Jim Marrs in his book Our Occulted History, sets his cross hairs on this very issue:

“The term mythology stems from the Greek word mythos, simply meaning words or stories reflecting the basic values and attitudes of people.  In past ages, when the vast majority of humans were illiterate, easily understood parables were used to educate people about history, science, and technology.  During the Dark Ages, when most of people were taught that the Earth was flat, the word mythology was changed by the Roman Church to mean imaginative and fanciful tales veering far from truthfulness.  This small change in semantics has caused untold damage in current perceptions.”[1][Emphasis Added]

Ironically enough, there is starting to be more and more evidence of ‘myths’ now turning out to be fact.

As Chris Hardy Ph.D remarks in her poignant book DNA Of The Gods:

“…let’s remember that, before the discoveries of loads of ancient tablets written in the pictographic Sumerian language (Late Uruk period, fourth millennium BCE), the kingdom of Sumer was believed to be a mythWe had already discovered Akkad and deciphered Akkadian, and still archaeologists wouldn’t give credence to the numerous carved references, within historical dated records, to a line of kings whose title was “King of Sumer and Akkad“.[2][3][Emphasis Added]

Or how about the “myth” of Troy:

This myth collapsed in 1865 with archeologist Frank Calvet’s discovery of the historic ruins of not only one city of Troy but nine layers of it!  The city, whose siege is recounted in Homer’s Iliad, is only Troy VII, the seventh level underground, dating to the thirteenth century BCE.”[4][Emphasis Added]

And notwithstanding:

“…according to geologist Robert Schoch, who, in 1990, worked with the renowned pioneer Egyptologist John Anthony West, the vertical erosion of the Sphinx was due to heavy and extensive rainfall that happened in the region between 10,000 and 5,000 BCE, thus dating the Sphinx’s construction to at least 7,000 to 8,000 years ago ) according to Schoch’s conservative estimate).  What was the reaction of conventional archaeologists?  Here is one: Zahi Hawass, Director General of Giza, was asked in an interview on the PBS series NOVA if it was possible that a more ancient civilization might have built the pyramids and sculpted the Sphinx.  Hawass replied: “Of course it is not possible for one reason…No single artifact, no single inscription, or pottery, or anything has been found until now, in any place to predate the Egyptian civilization more than 5,000 years ago.”[4]

That last passage in particular showcases the inherent dogma that we as a society have had to deal with.

The gatekeepers, for many reasons, want to keep established history in a nice little box.  Fortunately, as anyone who has extensively research these topics know, there’s more than ample evidence that shows that at minimum history isn’t what we have been told.

In any case, Cosmic War covers wide ranging but pertinent topics such as Van Flandern’s exploded planet hypothesis, an analysis of plasma in relation to weapons that employ scalar physics, petroglyphs which show plasma instability glyphs that were recorded by ancient cultures, remnants of giants in ancient history, optical phase conjugation, the story of the ‘gods’ as related through ancient texts, pulsars, generational charts of the ‘gods’, the scarring of The Valles Mariners being possibly from a weapon, Iapetus and its hexagonal craters, and a LOT more.

Another notable component that Dr. Farrell covers is the ‘Epic Of Ninurta’.  In The Cosmic War, the Epic of Ninurta is shared in full, and analyzed methodically. Dr. Farrell estimates that the ‘Epic’ of Ninurta is in fact nothing but an inventory of the technologies that were recovered from the losing side in the war.  If such is the case, there’s more to this story than meets the eye.

The ramifications of this book abound, and filter in all aspects of our lives.  Dr. Farrell gives is more reasons [coupled with countless others in his other trenchant books] as to why we need to give history, particularly ancient history, a very long and thorough look.

In its totality, this book is a veritable fountain of information that is scholarly in precision, and thought-provoking in its ramifications.  This book is a must read for anyone interested in ancient history, ancient civilizations, and any of the topics there in.  There is more than enough information to make the reader curious about our past in more ways than they can really imagine.
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Sources & References:

[1] Jim Marrs, Our Occulted History, pg. 168.
[2] German businessman and archaeologist Heinrich Schliemann also played a role in early excavations of Troy.
[3] Chris Hardy Ph.D, DNA Of The Gods, pg. 11.
[4] Ibid., pg. 11.
[5] Ibid., pg. 11.

Book Review: Wars Of The Anunnaki – Nuclear Self-Destruction In Ancient Sumer by Chris H. Hardy Ph.D

WAN

TheBreakaway
Zy Marquiez
August 16, 2016

Wars Of The Anunnaki by Chris H. Hardy Ph.D. is a masterly analysis of part of the hidden history that’s been kept from humanity.  If you have read Hardy’s previous work, DNA Of The Gods, you will undoubtedly love this piece.

The author’s main premise is that many thousands of years ago an ancient war took place in our planet with advanced weapons.  An ancient war that involved nuclear weapons during part of the pyramid wars.  To buttress this premise the author highlights various locales that were targets within the ancient war such as Sodom, Gomorrah.  Further, Hardy uses sources such as texts like the Nippur Lament, and the Hindu Mahabharata and many others to make her case as sound as possible.

The author also notes that lunatic Nergal, with the support of Enlil and more, made it a point of using at minimum 7 nukes to lay waste to those that wish to follow their own path and are deemed inferior to the “gods”.

As Hardy mentions, Enki, one of the ‘Gods’, voiced concern over the use of these Awesome Weapons:

“…the lands would make desolate, the people will make perish.”[sic][1]

Another intriguing detail is that of the Sinai plain, where the author suspects there’s evidence of nuclear weapons use.  The author mentions Zecharia Sitchin’s thoughts on the matter:

“Sitchin attests that the Sinai plain shows an enormous elongated scar, visible from the sky alone, and blackened as if by an immense heat: “The great place ( the spaceport and launching strips in the plain) was never to be seen again…but the scare made in the face of the earth that awesome day can still be seen to this very day”.[2]

For those skeptical of the author’s claims, it’s important to note that the claims are not just stated because of the translations of tablets/texts.  Hardy also uses other intriguing information such as the fact that the places where nuclear weapons might have been used rarely, if ever, have meteor craters.  This is vital because this is one of the main ‘facts’ paraded by the establishment, but holds no credence whatsoever.

Furthermore, as the author saliently states:

“The Libyan Desert Glass (so hard and so pure it is used to make blades), comes from hundreds of square kilometers of glass sheets and shards in the Great Sand Sea in western Egypt, strewn in two large spots.  Given the very explicit accounts we have from ancient texts, we certainly cannot avoid the much more plausible (and rational) explanations implying nuclear or other powerful weapons used in very ancient warfare. ”

As if that were not enough, the author homes in on the vitrified remains of the ziggurat at Birs Nimrod (Borsippa).  Taking into account some of David Childress’ information from Technology of the Gods:

“The ruins crowned by a mass of vitrified brickwork, actual clay bricks fused together by intense heat.”[3]

Which is quite synchronistic.  Why?  Because as ancient texts show:

“Borsippa was the city of Nabu, son of Marduk, and both were targets of the war that lead to the nuking of the Jordan plain.”[P4]

What a coincidence…

Moving on, although certainly a notable part of the story, this book by Hardy isn’t just about Nuclear Weapons.

Throughout the book Hardy focuses greatly on a comprehensive detailed analysis of ancient texts in order to narrow down what took place with the Anunnaki leadership which lead to such ancient devastation . Not only that, but the author also uses Semantics Field Theory [SFT] in order to analyze in depth much of the information that’s been taken as matter-of-fact regarding The Book [the Bible] in relation to ancient history, and does a convincing case of outlining how there were various narrators that were responsible for different layers within it.

Hardy’s cognizant of how The Book has played an integral part – for better and worse – to mold the type of society we live in.  Knowing this, she’s made it a point to make sure her interpretation is as correct as possible given how much trauma has been spawned from ancient dogma that was blindly followed and rarely questioned.

From the role the Anunnaki played in bringing about civilization, to how the development of humanity was subverted by Enlil and his kith and kin, to the psychological impact humanity has dealt with due to the institutional dogma that’s been passed down authoritatively, the author attempts to leave no stone unturned in her quest for what ancient history really was.

As an open-minded skeptic, am very appreciative of her work because regardless of what one thinks of it, its sourced to the hilt, and its rather reasonable given the enormous body of data that keeps growing to buttress the fact that something intriguing and very nefarious did take place in our ancient history.

Wars Of The Anunnaki
offers an apt description of what possibly could have taken place given the wide amount of evidence that keeps being unearthed.  Couple with the author’s relentless search for truth, and her quite wide-ranging and yet incisive questions throughout the tome, the book offers a solid foundation for the possibility of ancient wars in humanity’s past.

If only a fraction of what the author attests is true, then ancient history as we know it is vastly different than what the conventional establishment would have you believe.  And the more time passes, the more it appears that this is not only possible, but very likely.  The fact that the author’s approach is sound, rational and methodical makes this book that much more thought-provoking.

This is the type of book whose data should be openly debated in the mainstream, but never will be.  That being the case, it’s up to inquiring individuals to educate themselves into the possibilities that the mainstream establishment will not touch, and this book sets out to do just that, educate individuals into a large part of our missing history that’s in great part responsible for how society is today.

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Source:

[1] Chris Hardy Ph.D., Wars Of The Anunnaki, pg. 171.
[2] Ibid. pg., 175.
[3] Ibid. pg,. 189-190.
[4] Ibid. pg., 190.

[Book Review] How Doctors Think by Dr. Jerome Groopman

HDT
TheBreakaway
Zy Marquiez
July 6, 2016

There are doctors that follow the tune that the Medical Industrial Complex plays, and there are ones who buck the trend.  Dr. Groopman is one of the latter, thankfully.

In How Doctors Think, The New Yorker staff writer and Harvard professor of medicine & researcher Dr. Groopman offers a distinctive look into the structure of Big Medica in search for what exactly is the type of mindset Doctors employ when practicing their jobs.

Groopman does a compelling job throughout the book in making sure he relates the plights plaguing medicine from both sides of the coin, from the patients perspective, as well as from the perspective of a physician.  This aids in the book not being one sided.  It helps greatly that he’s also a Doctor with experience in this very field.

From medical, money, marketing, uncertainty, dogma, to various other components of medicine, Groopman attempts to turn over as many stones as possible in his search for what issues are the ones plaguing Doctors the most.

A notable point in the book that hit close to home, which many people will relate to is the emotional tension that can arise at times between patients and their doctors.  Essentially, whether patients and doctors like each other.  Groopman relates what Social Psychologist, Judy Hall discovered regarding emotional tension:

“..that those feelings are hardly secret on either side of the table.  In studies of primary care physicians and surgeons, patients knew remarkably accurately how the doctor actually felt about them.  Much of this, of course, comes from nonverbal behavior: the physician’s facial expressions, how he is seated, whether his gestures are warm and welcoming or formal and remote.  “The doctor is supposed to be emotionally neutral and evenhanded with everybody,” Hall said, “and we know that’s not true.”[1]

What’s worse, is that Hall’s research indicated:

“…that the sickest patients are the least liked by doctors, and that very sick people sense this disaffection.  Overall, doctors tend to like healthier people more.”[2]  So much for quality health care.

Along with the above example, the author additionally notes many other examples of issues that arise due to a crisis in communication which can arrive in myriad ways.

In fact, one of these issues that Groopman relates is that:

“…on average, physicians interrupt patients within eighteen seconds of when they begin telling their story.”[3]

Another salient aspect of Big Medica that the author sunk his teeth into was the psychological aspect of medicine.  Predictably, far too often doctors/western medicine view the patients psychological components as being apart from the body, rather than taking a much-needed holistic approach.

Additionally, the institutional dogma that reigns down from the top is also touched upon in a few instances by the author.  Open-mindedness is scoffed at, while conformity was expected.

Recounting an example of choosing between the availability of multiple medical options regarding a particular treatment, Groopman relates something noted by physician Jay Katz, who taught at Yale Law school at the time:

“In both [treatments]…we were educated for dogmatic certainty, for adopting one school of thought or the other, and for playing the game according to the venerable, but contradictory, rules that each institution sought to impose on staff, students and patients.”[4]

Another disturbing component that doctors acquiesce to that is covered by Groopman is how doctors far too often give into to corporate interests.  This very issue has covered by other doctors such as Dr. Brogan, Dr. Breggin, Dr. Mercola and many others.

This book sheds much needed light into the inner workings of how doctors operate – how they think.  While the author notes that a sizeable amount of the issues have a variety of roots at the outset, such as communication, what he conveys still leads to much concern within the Medical Industrial Complex.

In the end, individuals will need to become much more proactive/responsible in their health if they plan to breakaway from the conventional medical system that puts profits over people.

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Sources & References:

[1] Dr. Jerome Groopman, M.D., How Doctors Think, pg. 19.
[2] Ibid., pg. 19
[3] Ibid., pg. 17
[4] Ibid., pg. 153