5 of The Most Common Food Intolerance Culprits!

Source: iHealthTube
April 22, 2017

Nutrition expert JJ Virgin discusses food intolerance and how you can know if that might be an issue for you. She discusses what she’s seen as the most common culprits when it comes to food issues and what you can do to find out for yourself.

Moms Speak Out About Genetically Modified Foods [GMOs]

Source: InstituteForResponsibleTechnology
November 23, 2016

No mother ever knowingly risks her child’s health. Hear what these mothers have to say about their experience with genetically modified foods.

Best Source For Desert Adapted Vegetables Seeds

Source: GrowingYourGreens.com
July 19, 2016

John from http://www.growingyourgreens.com/ goes on a field trip to Tucson, Arizona to share with you the Native Seed/SEARCH Store.

The Native Seed/SEARCH organization is a non-profit dedicated to protecting and preserving arid climate crops to nourish the changing world.

John will give you a personal tour of the store in Tucson, Arizona.

You will learn about some of the proven desert adapted vegetable seeds they offer as well as some of their special seeds from their Seed bank that contains over hundreds of varieties of Heirloom Adapted Crops of Southwest North America. John will share some of his favorite varieties of corn, tomato, leafy greens, cucumbers, peppers, squash and even more vegetables.

Next, John will share with you a part of the store that offers gardening supplies such as some books he likes and Olla Bottles and Olla Bottles that allow you to conserve water in your vegetable garden.

You will discover the importance of diversity in the garden and in life and how it is one of the fundamental keys to success in desert vegetable gardening.

You will discover the in-store SEED BANK where you can check out local Tucson Adapted seeds at no-cost so you can get your garden growing. Of course at the end of the season, you can return the newly grown seeds that you produced.

Next, you will discover about some of the local foods of the Southwest and foods that you should be including in your diet. Many of which are more traditional foods before modern foods came into existence. John will also share some valuable tips with you on how you can save lots of money on certain varieties of desert adapted seeds that you can grow in your garden. You will learn about mesquite flour, heirloom corn, heirloom beans, cactus fruit, hot peppers and much, much more.

Finally, John will share with you the one seed rack that EVERY seed store should have and why. You will also learn which desert adapted vegetable seeds John will be purchasing and growing himself in his desert garden.

After watching this episode, you will have a better understanding of some of the crops that can be grown in the desert, the best place to get the seeds for these crops as well as new foods you can try that have been grown in the desert to expand your nutritional diversity and taste sensations in your diet.

Merge-Santo – New Threat To Food Sovereignty

[Editor’s Note]

This is a rather disturbing trend that if successful will pose great risk to the global food supply, people’s health, and ultimately food freedoms most are already highly lacking.
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“If the marriages of DuPont-Dow and Syngenta–Chem China go through and Monsanto merges with Bayer’s Agricultural division, the three will control more than 65% of global pesticide sales and almost 61% of commercial seed sales. If Monsanto and BASF strike a deal instead, the Titanic Three will still have almost 61% of pesticides and more than 57% of seeds”  [Bold Emphasis Added]

This article is copyrighted by GreenMedInfo LLC, 2016
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Merge-Santo: New Threat to Food Sovereignty
Source: GreenMedInfo
GMI Reporter
March 25, 2016

Briefing Note
23 March 2016

ETC Group

Now, world agriculture has three mega-mergers in play: Merge-Santo – New Threat to Food Sovereignty.  If we act, we can stop the Big Six from becoming the Titanic Three.

As ETC first warned in May[i] last year and again in February[ii] this year, the pressure of two mergers among the Big Six Gene Giants would make a third merger inevitable. In the last few days the business media have reported that Monsanto is in separate talks with Bayer and BASF – the two German giants among agricultural input companies. While anti-competition regulators are fussing about the hook up of DuPont with Dow and of Syngenta with Chem China, Monsanto urgently needs to make a match. They hope that if regulators let the other two deals go through, they won’t be able to deny Monsanto a chance to even the score.

If the companies get their way, the first links in the industrial food chain (seeds, pesticides) will be in the hands of just three companies. If the marriages of DuPont-Dow and Syngenta–Chem China go through and Monsanto merges with Bayer’s Agricultural division, the three will control more than 65% of global pesticide sales and almost 61% of commercial seed sales. If Monsanto and BASF strike a deal instead, the Titanic Three will still have almost 61% of pesticides and more than 57% of seeds (see chart below).

Either way, a fourth move will be inevitable. Whichever company is left at the altar (Bayer or BASF) will have to buy or sell since it won’t have the clout to take on the Three. Either could prove irresistible for Deere & Co. or one of the other huge farm machinery companies that are in the best position to ultimately dominate all on-farm related agricultural inputs from seeds and pesticides to fertilizers, machinery, data and insurance.

So What?

Some industry watchers wonder if this latest spate of mergers will really make a difference to an industry which is already tightly-concentrated and where the six Gene Giants that have dominated seed and pesticide markets for the last decade already have so many joint ventures and cross-licensing arrangements that they have a de facto monopoly.

From another perspective, peasant organizations and agroecologists neither buy corporate seeds nor want their pesticides. According to recent estimates[iii], at least 90% of the seeds that peasant farmers plant every year come from their own bins or are bartered with neighbours in local markets. Since these are the peasants that actually feed 70% of the world’s people, the machinations of multinationals could be considered of no matter.

Causes for Concern:

Commercial seeds may only make up 10% of peasants’ seed supply but the corporations have virtually all of the “face time” with policymakers. Trade, farm subsidies, labour laws, patents, land use, phytosanitary regulations, infrastructure spending and marketing policies are skewed to the interests of the biggest agribusinesses and the 100 million farms they claim as clients. The 570 million peasant families[iv] that really feed the world bear the burden of these skewed policies – not just as a direct attack – but as collateral damage. The more concentrated the lobbying power of industrial agriculture, the more destruction to the Peasant Food Web and agroecological food systems.

The threat is not only concentration but also integration. When pesticide companies began buying seed companies in the 1970s, the companies first denied it was happening and, later, argued that the synergies were beneficial. Four decades later, allowing seeds and chemicals to combine has done an enormous damage to plant breeding. The agrochemical giants concentrate overwhelmingly on a handful of commodity crops (corn, soybean, cotton, etc.) engineered primarily to tolerate proprietary chemicals. The result has been a decline in the quality of plant breeding for conventional varieties and an increase in the use of crop chemicals. The impacts are especially devastating for farmers who want to get off the pesticide treadmill – they can’t get good seed and can’t escape their neighbour’s drifting pesticides.

Policymakers – who refused to acknowledge the negative impacts of the seed/chemical complex –  will now confront the next level of integration. The world’s seed and pesticide businesses are small potatoes compared to the fertilizer and farm machinery industries. The farm machinery behemoth, Deere & Co., all by itself, has sales equivalent to about two thirds the sales of the entire seed industry.  For the big three tractor companies that share 49% of the world market, taking over the big three seed/pesticide companies (with even greater concentration) seems a nice fit.
If national anti-competition regulators allow the three seed and pesticide mega-mergers to go ahead, the slippery slope into machinery or fertilizer combinations will be hard to arrest.

Winning Grounds: 

The mergers already on the table will not be decided in Washington or Brussels and victory won’t go to the highest-paid lawyers. It’s all about national politics and shareholder profits.

Continue Reading At: GreenMedInfo.com

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‘Seeds Of Change’ Documents The Seed Saving Movement

HeirloomSeeds

Source:Mercola.com
Dr. Mercola
January 23, 2016

Seeds are essential to maintain future food supplies. They are the foundation of life, from fruits and vegetables to grain and livestock feed — without them, we have no food. It’s estimated that upwards of 90 percent of our caloric intake comes from seeds, directly or indirectly.

Seeds represent hope and new beginnings. When you save seeds, you’re joining a lineage of farmers, gardeners and seed enthusiasts that dates back to the Stone Age — our civilization arose, in large part, due to seed saving.

Early humans selected the best wild plants with which to feed themselves, passing those varieties along to others by saving and sharing seeds.

Sadly, age-old heirloom varieties are disappearing at an alarming rate — 90 percent of the crop varieties grown 100 years ago are already gone. The Millennium Seed Bank Partnership estimates that 60,000 to 100,000 plant species are in danger of extinction.1

In response to these snowballing losses, a movement to save seeds is sweeping the nation.

The PBS documentary “Seeds of Change” features seed savers who are pursuing grassroots alternatives to GMOs and to industrialized agricultural practices that threaten our health and the health of the planet.

The Disastrous Consequences of Patenting Life

Traditionally, seeds have been saved and shared between farmers from one season to the next. Farmers rarely ever had to buy new seed. Nature, when left alone, provides you with the means to propagate the next harvest in a never-ending cycle.

Today, valuable heirlooms have been replaced by massive expanses of genetically engineered (GE) crops. According to the USDA, 94 percent of U.S. soy and 88 percent of U.S. corn are now genetically engineered.

It’s estimated that, since 1970, 20,000 seed companies have been swallowed up by mega-corporations. In 2005, Monsanto bought the world’s largest fruit and vegetable seed company, Seminis, for $1.4 billion.

Just four agrichemical companies now own 43 percent of the world’s commercial seed supply, and 10 multinational corporations hold 65 percent of global commercial seed for major crops.2

Many farmers are now dependent on patented GE seeds and must buy them every year from companies like Monsanto. Saving such seeds is illegal because it’s considered patent infringement.

Farmers don’t buy the seed outright anymore — they essentially buy a license to use the seed for a short period of time — typically one season. It’s more of a lease, or a “technology use agreement.”

For 200 years, the patenting of life was prohibited, especially with respect to foods. But in 1978, all of that changed with the first patent of a living organism, an oil-eating microbe, which opened the proverbial floodgates. One of Monsanto’s proxies has a patent claiming 463,173 separate plant genes!

Patenting of life was never approved by Congress or the American public, but as far as the GMO industry is concerned, they own a gene wherever it ends up and however it gets there.

You have undoubtedly heard the argument that GE foods are the only way to feed the world (which is, by the way, completely false). What is often not mentioned in that argument, however, is the inequality of the playing fields.

According to the featured documentary, in one three-year period alone, public funding for the development of GE versus organic crops was 70 to one!

Every Day, Your Food Choices Become Increasingly Limited

Over the course of 80 years (between 1903 and 1983), we lost 93 percent of the variety in our food seeds. According to Rural Advancement Foundation International:3

  • We went from 497 varieties of lettuce to 36
  • We went from 288 varieties of beets to 17
  • We went from 307 varieties of sweet corn to 12

Even the popular heirloom tomato has taken an enormous hit, having lost at least 80 percent of its diversity over the last century. Even more tragic is the fact that many of these precious plants are being replaced by patented GE varieties.

Continue Reading At: Mercola.com