Colorado farmers go organic to meet growing demand

Image: Colorado farmers go organic to meet growing demand
Source: NaturalNews.com
Amy Goodrich
February 14, 2017

While big agricultural corporations are trying to find ways to fill their pockets with profits from pesticide-laden food, Colorado farmers are working hard to make the transition to less profitable organic farming methods to protect our health and meet the rising demand for clean, organic food.

While the need for organic food is growing fast, organic food sales still account for a relatively small share of the total U.S. food market. Since 2000, organic food sales have exhibited a yearly double-digit growth, providing opportunities for U.S. organic farmers to enter high-value markets in the United States and other countries.

According to an annual survey of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Colorado’s organic agricultural industry has more than doubled in sales in the past three years. In an email to The Denver Post, Tom Lipetzky, the director of marketing programs and strategic initiatives at the ‎Colorado Department of Agriculture, said that today’s consumers are more and more engaged in their food purchases. Not only do they want to know where their food is coming from, but they also want to know how it was produced. (RELATED: read more about clean, organic foods at Ingredients.news.)

Organic farmland in Colorado covers more than 155,000 acres, with another 70,000 acres dedicated to organic pasture- and rangeland. While the transition to organic farming methods can be expensive, time-consuming, and almost always comes with a high amount of crop loss, this isn’t stopping many farmers from making the switch.

In 1907, the Hungenberg family started a farm on 7 acres, which has now grown to 4,000 acres. With the growing organic food trend, co-owner Jordan Hungenberg said they didn’t want to be left behind, so they decided to make the switch slowly. Last year they dedicated about 62 acres of their farmland to growing carrots using organic farming methods.

While they lost more than half of their crop during their first year and had to hire more people, Hungenberg noted that all in all it was a success. They even made a little money out of the harvest, and are now planning to triple their planting of organic carrots for next season.

The ‘certified organic’ sticker goes a long way

With the growing population of health-conscious people in mind, many farmers across Colorado see the potential long-term benefits they will get from making the switch. Becca Jablonski, an assistant professor and food systems extension economist at Colorado State University, said that farmers who sell their USDA “certified organic” produce to major supermarkets are on the right track to ensure financial success. Today’s consumers are more and more drawn to foods which bear the certified organic sticker to protect their families from the harmful effects of GMOs and pesticides.  (RELATED: Stay informed about the damaging effects of pesticides at Pesticides.news.)

Tim Ferrell, owner of Berry Patch Farms in Brighton, added that he has seen the positive effect the USDA “certified organic” sticker has on food sales. While also drawn to the premium sales prices of organic food, using organic farming methods has brought him peace of mind.

“We just do not feel comfortable using fertilizers that would infiltrate the water table,” he said.

Though many farmers complain about the higher cost, research into organic farming methods that reduce the cost and crop loss are booming. According to Kaylee Armstrong of Abundant Life Organic Farms in Hotchkiss, non-chemical products that can be used are becoming more and more available. She even said that they increased the prices of their organic foods to match those of conventional growers. However, this is not a benefit all organic farmers are experiencing just yet. Therefore, special programs exist to help farmers with the costs involved in transitioning to certified organic farming methods.

Colorado’s dry climate seems to be the perfect fit to grow organic crops. There is one thing in the organic evolution, however, that troubles Kaylee Armstrong: the introduction of large food corporations to the market.

“We don’t want to see them lobbying the government to make regulations lower,” she said, which could result in a lower quality of organic food. “We’ve already seen it in the egg industry,” she said.

Sources:

DenverPost.com

ERS.USDA.gov

USDA.MannLib.Cornell.edu[PDF]

10 Sinister State Moves, Including Killing Protesters, Prove 1st Amendment Is Dying


via: ActivistPost.com
Source: FreeThoughtProject.com
Claire Bernish
January 28, 2017

“Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.”

President Donald Trump’s first week in office has seen a tumultuous mix of sweeping executive actions peppered with a few pleasant surprises; but if one thing proves true — as with the first term of any new president — there will be cause for someone to protest something.

Indeed, before Trump even took the oath of office, protesters descended on Washington, D.C. — marching en masse down the middle of typically congested roadways, chanting, screaming, and generally causing the sort of disruptions demonstrators seek in order to draw attention to a cause.

But that most basic right — to air one’s grievances to elected leaders in a public forum, often through disruption — might soon be a risky endeavor in at least ten states, as protest is gradually being criminalized in rather astonishing ways.

Lawmakers from North Dakota and Minnesota, to Virginia and the state of Washington, have proposed or passed legislation levying hefty penalties against anyone who dares to exercise the basic right to protest against — ironically enough — legislation and policy found to be untenable.

At the rate such laws have rapidly come to fruition, even if legislators in your state have yet to propose obstacles to protesting, the following list should serve as a guide for potential future strictures regarding your right to speak out.

1. NORTH DAKOTA

North Dakota lawmakers have proposed arguably the most crushing measures against protesters — seemingly specifically targeting water protectors opposing construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline.

Under House Bill 1203, drivers would be permitted to run down protesters — literally — so long as they claim they didn’t intend to do so. As the proposed bill states,

“Notwithstanding any other provision of law, a driver of a motor vehicle who unintentionally causes injury or death to an individual obstructing vehicular traffic on a public road, street, or highway, is not guilty of an offense.”

In other words, if a protester in a roadway were to be struck by a vehicle and killed, the driver would not be charged with a crime if they claimed, for example, accidentally hitting the accelerator instead of the brakes.

House Majority Leader Al Carlson proffered a second bill criminalizing wearing masks to protests; and, though the legislation would allow exceptions for harsh weather conditions and holidays wear face coverings are traditional, it’s an open question how police might interpret those exemptions.

“I would be the first to defend your right of free speech and freedom of assembly,” Carlson told a state legislative committee hearing on Tuesday of House Bill 1304, according to the Billings Gazette. “I’m always concerned when there’s a reason that, I believe, may be used to hide your identity when you’re creating some kind of disturbance.”

Should the legislation pass, masks would not be permitted at demonstrations on public property or roadways — nor on private property, unless the owner gives explicit, written consent.

2. MISSOURI

Missouri legislators are also hoping to criminalize mask-wearing at protests in a bill that would make intentional concealment of one’s “identity by the means of a robe, mask, or other disguise” at any gathering deemed an “unlawful assembly” punishable as a Class A misdemeanor — with a penalty of up to one full year behind bars.

3. MINNESOTA

As alarming as it might be that a mask could land you in jail in Missouri or that North Dakota drivers can run down protesters without facing charges, Minnesota lawmakers took the criminalization of demonstrations in an equally shocking but wholly different direction — the wallet.

Minnesotans whose protests force police to intervene would be financially liable for the cost of the intervention should Rep. Nick Zerwas’ legislation by written into law.

As the Star Tribune reports, a committee meeting on Tuesday “ended abruptly after a House panel passed Zerwas’ proposed legislation that would give cities authority to charge protesters for police services if the demonstrators are convicted of illegal assembly or public nuisance. The measure would also give cities the option of suing convicted protesters to recoup expenses from policing the demonstration.”

Furious residents disrupted that meeting, rightly questioning the measure’s constitutionality and what the bill would mean for future ability to demonstrate against acts of police violence, as in the shooting death of Philando Castile in 2016 — or in any instance where complaint falls on deaf ears and public assembly stands as the only option.

Zerwas and the bill’s supporters, however, side with Minnesotans who resent large demonstrations, and say the financial onus of policing protests should fall on those participating.

“I have an entire constituency that feels as though protesters believe that their rights are more important than everyone else’s,” Zerwas explained in an interview cited by the Guardian. “Well, there is a cost to that. Rosa Parks sat in the front of the bus. She didn’t get out and lay down in front of the bus.”

He added, “The meters are running and the taxpayers are holding the bag.”

And as the Intercept reports, “In addition to the highway-protesting bill, Minnesota lawmakers also proposed a separate piece of legislation that greatly increases penalties for nonviolent cases involving ‘obstructing the legal process.’ Under the bill’s language, nonviolent obstruction of authorities would carry ‘imprisonment of not less than 12 months’ and a fine of up to $10,000.”

4. IOWA

Where North Dakota legislators want to permit, in essence, vehicular homicide to curb the blockage of roadways, and Minnesota lawmakers seek to make such protests too costly, politicians in Iowa would rather throw demonstrators who block highways in jail for five years.

Senator Jake Chapman proposed Senate File 111 in response to an incident in November in which some 100 protesters blocked Interstate Highway 80 and brought eastbound traffic to a standstill for around 30 minutes — much to the consternation of drivers caught in the unexpected jam.

“Look, we have the right to protest. No one disputes that,” the lawmaker explained in defense of his controversial bill, which, incidentally, isn’t without opposition. “We encourage that. But there is an appropriate time and an appropriate place to do so. Interstates are not one of those places. That is what this bill does. It aims to stop that.”

As COO of Midwest Ambulance Service, Chapman claims to be concerned such spontaneous highway blockages obstruct access for emergency services, as well as free commerce and travel.

If passed, Chapman’s law “would apply to people blocking the travel portion of Iowa highways with speeds posted at 55 mph or higher. Violators could be charged with a Class D felony, which includes a sentence of prison time and a fine of at least $750 and up to $7,500,” the Des Moines Register reports.

5. INDIANA

In line with aforementioned proposals, Indiana State Senator Jim Tomes introduced the “Block Traffic and You Die” bill — or, at least, that’s how opponents are characterizing the Hoosier State’s anti-protest legislation.

Senate Bill 285 would require public officials to dispatch all available law enforcement to clear roadways — using “any means necessary” — if at least 10 protesters have attempted to obstruct traffic without first obtaining a permit.

Although indeed vague, it is the ‘any means necessary’ portion of Tomes’ proposed law that worries activists who have traditionally worked with police. Often officers will escort marchers in roadways, blocking cross traffic for them to pass, ensuring both protesters and drivers remain safe. Thus, opponents of the legislation find it frivolous and curiously worded — and far too open to interpretation.

And there are still more proposed laws restricting the constitutional right to protest.

6. COLORADO

“In Colorado,” the Intercept reports, “Republican state Sen. Jerry Sonnenberg has introduced a bill that would greatly increase penalties for environmental protesters. Under the proposed law, obstructing or tampering with oil and gas equipment would be reclassified from a misdemeanor to a ‘class 6’ felony, a category of crime that reportedly can be punished by up to 18 months behind bars and a fine of up to $100,000.”

7. WASHINGTON

Washington State Senator Doug Ericksen proposed creating a new crime to facilitate charging protesters with a felonies for blocking roads and other assorted activities — he hopes to deem them “economic terrorists.”

Ericksen seeks to allow felony prosecution “of those who intentionally break the law in an attempt to intimidate or coerce private citizens or the government by obstructing economic activity.” However, the broad brush language in his proposed legislation deeply concerns civil and constitutional rights advocates, like Doug Honig of the Washington ACLU, who noted in a statement quoted by Q13 FOX,

The statement throws out a lot of broad rhetoric, and we’ll need to see an actual bill.  But we’re already concerned that some of its loose terms  appear to be targeting  civil disobedience as ‘terrorism.’  That’s the kind of excessive approach to peaceful protest that our country and state do not need.

Let’s keep in mind that civil rights protesters who sat down at lunch counters could be seen as ‘disrupting business’ and ‘obstructing economic activity,’ and their courageous actions were opposed by segregationists as trying to ‘coerce business and government.’

Lawmakers in two states have taken a more unusual route to combat protests.

8. NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina Senator Dan Bishop wants to provide controversial Governor Pat McCrory — and incidentally any politician — an official safe space away from hecklers who might approach to, well, scream unpleasant words.

Bishop, reports the News & Observer, decided verbal criticism of politicians was worthy of legal protection after witnessing McCrory being followed and yelled at over inaugural weekend in Washington, D.C. Should the proposed legislation pass, it would thus be “a crime to threaten, intimidate, or retaliate against a present or former North Carolina official in the course of, or on account of, the performance of his or her duties.”

9. MICHIGAN

Rather than worrying about political or environmental protesters, Michigan lawmakers turned their attention to union workers with two proposed pieces of legislation aimed to sharply curtail the right to picket for grievances such as pay or safety conditions.

“One bill would increase fines against picketers to $1,000 per person per day of a picket and $10,000 per day for an organization or union involved in the picket that is deemed to be an illegal mass picket,” the Detroit Free Press reported last month.

“The other would repeal a law that requires employers to include information about an ongoing strike when they advertise to hire employees who will replace existing, but striking employees at a company.”

10. VIRGINIA

Only in Virginia did a lone lawmaker stand in opposition to their party’s proposed legislative crackdown on protest, as the Daily Press reports

Senate Bill 1055 would have increased penalties for failing to disperse when police declare an unlawful assembly, upping a misdemeanor that brings only a fine now to one with potential jail time. It was one of four bills on protest punishments filed this session by state Sen. Richard Stuart, R-Montross, and the last of the four to die.

* * *

All told, this collection of anti-protest legislation constitutes an overarching attempt to quash the right of the people to demonstrate when the government errs against them — and the result will only increase near unbearable police state conditions already choking out First Amendment protections in the United States.

With division at unprecedented levels over politics, police violence, and, really, any nameable issue, such extraneous laws can only be attempting one thing.

As Lee Rowland, a senior staff attorney at the American Civil Liberties Union, warned in a statement to the Intercept,

This trend of anti-protest legislation dressed up as ‘obstruction’ bills is deeply troubling. A law that would allow the state to charge a protester $10,000 for stepping in the wrong place, or encourage a driver to get away with manslaughter because the victim was protesting, is about one thing: chilling protest.

Read More at: ActivistPost.com

Claire Bernish writes for TheFreeThoughtProject.com, where this article first appeared.

Colorado readies for ‘all out war’ as anti-fracking measures advance to ballot

Fracking

Source: NaturalNews.com
Lauren McCauley
August 13, 2016

The government of Colorado has so far managed to quash efforts to halt the spread of fracking in that state, but come November, residents will finally have the chance to overpower the will of politicians and Big Oil and Gas.

(Article by Lauren McCauley, republished from Commondreams.org)

Petitioners on Monday submitted more than 200,000 signatures backing two separate initiatives to amend the Colorado constitution, specifically in regards to the controversial drilling method.

“This is a good day for Colorado, and it’s a good day for democracy,” said Lauren Petrie, Rocky Mountain Region director of Food and Water Watch. “These initiatives will give communities political tools to fend off the oil and gas industry’s effort to convert our neighborhoods to industrial sites. This is a significant moment in the national movement to stem the tide of fracking and natural gas.”

Initiative 78 would establish a 2,500-foot buffer zone protecting homes, hospitals and schools, as well as sensitive areas like playgrounds and drinking water sources, from new oil and gas development. This expands the current mandate of a 500-foot setback from homes and, according to Coloradans Resisting Extreme Energy Development (CREED), is based upon health studies that show increased risks within a half mile of fracked wells and the perimeters of real-life explosion, evacuation, and burn zones.

Colorado regulators say that, if passed, Initiative 78 could effectively halt new oil and gas exploration and production in as much of 90 percent of the state.

Initiative 75 would establish local government control of oil and gas development, authorizing local municipalities “to pass a broad range of more protective regulations, prohibitions, limits or moratoriums on oil and gas development—or not,” according to the grassroots group.

This measure challenges a May ruling by the Colorado Supreme Court which said that state law overrides local fracking bans.

Various moratoriums or anti-fracking measures bans have been passed by the communities of Lafeyette, Boulder, Fort Collins, Broomfield, El Paso County, and Longmont—though many of these efforts were quashed by the Supreme Court ruling. Campaigners are hopeful that the initiatives would lay the foundation for many more.

Colorado’s Democratic Governor John Hickenlooper, an infamous proponent of fracking, has voiced his strong disapproval of the ordinances.

The signature deadline was met Monday despite the fact that the citizen volunteers faced harassment and, as Common Dreams previously reported, a massive, industry-funded opposition campaign which included deceptive television ads telling citizens to “decline to sign” the ballot petitions.

Reporting by the Colorado Independent revealed the campaign to be “part of an orchestrated, multi-year effort by both Colorado-based and national energy giants. One of their front groups is Protect Colorado, which funded the petition-gatherer-of-doom TV ad and is actively seeking to thwart citizens from qualifying the two measures for the ballot.”

“Industry has been gearing up for this fight for five years,” Dan Grossman, Rocky Mountain regional director for the Environmental Defense Fund, told ThinkProgress. “This was kind of the pre-fight, the undercard… If either of these make it onto the ballot, we’re going to see a cage match — an all-out war.”

And the stakes are high. As the New York Times put it, should either measure pass, “it would represent the most serious political effort yet” to stop fracking in the U.S..

The Colorado Secretary of State’s Office now has 30 days to authenticate the signatures before they make the ballot. The announcement is expected to be made by September 7.

Read more at: Commondreams.org

Big Oil Wins Again: Fracking Bans Banned In Yet Another State

fracking

Source: UndergroundReporter.org
May 3, 2016

The Colorado Supreme Court ruled on Monday that state law trumps two cities’ attempts to stem the domestic fracking boom, issuing “a severe slap in the face” to Coloradans and local democracy alike.

The court heard cases from Longmont, where voters banned the oil and gas drilling practice in 2012, and Fort Collins, where voters approved a 5-year moratorium in 2013. The Colorado Oil and Gas Association, an industry trade group that brought the suits against both cities, argued that the fossil fuel-friendly state clearly regulates fracking, and the cities can’t forbid a practice that the state allows.

According to the Denver Post:

“The court ruled that Fort Collins’ five-year moratorium within the city limits is “a matter of mixed state and local concern and, therefore, is subject to preemption by state law. Applying well-established preemption principles, the court further concludes that Fort Collins’s moratorium operationally conflicts with the effectuation of state law.”

“It said the same in Longmont’s 2012 ban on fracking.”

“The Oil and Gas Conservation Act and the Commission’s pervasive rules and regulations … convince us that the state’s interest in the efficient and responsible development of oil and gas resources includes a strong interest in the uniform regulation of fracking,” the court wrote in the Longmont ruling.

In other words, said Sierra Club executive director Michael Brune, “The Colorado Supreme Court has now ruled that corporate polluters’ profits outweigh the will of Coloradans who have said ‘no’ to fracking and ‘yes’ to a safe environment for their communities.”

Continue Reading At: UndergroundReporter.org

4/30/2016 — Global Earthquake Forecast — West Coast USA Warning, Europe + Asia Unrest

Source: Dutchsince
April 30, 2016

It appears we may be on the cusp of a larger earthquake to strike this week. After a flurry of M7.0+ earthquakes (and several near M7.0 – upper M6.0) struck around the Pacific plate over the past few weeks, we are now seeing swarms of earthquakes break out at multiple regions around the Pacific.

All links mentioned in the video here:

Earthquakes are related over a distance, striking back to back across the Pacific plate within hours or a day:

http://dutchsinse.com/4282016-it-happ…

Several of the swarms measuring in the M4.0+ range, but the USGS has not reported the events on any of their feeds for some reason. Taiwan, South Japan, Ecuador just to name a few locations where swarms are occurring, but no earthquakes are being reported by the USGS.

Europe showing the stress as well. Now needing to watch Europe for noteworthy movement this week in the M4.0+ range, across the region spanning from the English Channel to Poland and from Switzerland to Serbia (based on the new deep earthquake below Serbia).

United States should see interior plate movement and coastal movement this week across California. Specifically the border of Nevada + California , as well as Southern California near Los Angeles. Keep watch for M5.0+ earthquakes to strike this week. Hope for swarms of lesser events, but plan for a single event in the M5.0+ range. If things get larger, it will be preceded by movement at the interior volcanoes spanning California, Arizona, Utah, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington State.

The North American craton across the United States needs to keep serious watch in the midwest for possible larger movement as well. Specifically the Texas, Colorado, Kansas, and Oklahoma fracking operations. M4.0+ are on the schedule for this week, no way around it in light of the cluster of Earthquakes already showing in the Northwest from Yellowstone to San Francisco ( a sign of pressure pushing from the NW to the SE.. the line of earthquakes denoting where the pressure is coming from and going to.

The East coast of the USA also needs to be on watch for new earthquake activity to strike near Virginia, as well as new activity to strike further Northeast near the US / Canada border with New York and Quebec. M3.0+ could be possible.

If we see larger movement on the West coast , it will cause larger movement in the midwest, which will then cause larger movement on the East coast. The current magnitudes forecast are based upon a M5.0 range earthquake striking California or the Coast of California / Oregon.

____
West Pacific, keep watch in South Indonesia , across the location where the multiple eruptions occurred (which has now gone silent). Taiwan should see noteworthy movement again, as well as central Japan.

This week should be active around the whole Pacific. West and East should both be struck by noteworthy movement greater than what we’ve seen the past 2 weeks.

– Weather Modification Caught – “Scalar Square” Over Colorado Deep Space Transmitter

Source: Dutchsince
April 29, 2016

A “Scalar Square” has appeared on RADAR over a high power transmitter in Colorado.

Here are screenshots of the event:

http://dutchsinse.com/wp-content/uplo…

This heated area above the transmitter will produce wind rotation, and storm formation within usually 2 days or less. Keep watch AFTER this current storm passes for tornadoes , damaging winds, and hail nearby this Scalar Square epicenter.

Much more on SCALAR areas being heated by Radio waves:

http://dutchsinse.com/3232015-boeing-…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VcTKA…

_____

The epicenter of this Colorado Scalar Square is DIRECTLY over the DSES deep space exploration dish. http://www.dses.org

Notice the DSES dish is operating in the same bandwidth range than NEXRAD RADAR pulses in, and operates in.

NEXRAD pulses in MHz (teens usually), and normally operates in the microwave 2GHz range. Thus the two systems can somewhat overlap in frequency.

The area where the two beams meet forms a scalar, a heated area above the transmitter.

The heated area produces electron cascade + plasma formation… as well as actual heat + wind rotation where the plasma is forming.

The plasma fans out its ions after the event occurs, which then turns into CCN (attracting water molecules to the ions) forming clouds + rain (additional water molecules on top of current naturally formed rain / clouds).

Ultimately, this rotation above the transmitter, heated area, and CCN formation causes new storms to form. The storms are usually magnetically drawn to the location which produced the plasma heated area.

Thus, we see RADAR stations and locations like the DSES actually INDUCE or cause storm formation within days of producing the scalar heated region.

Parameters for the DSES dish:

Frequencies: 10 MHz – 2 GHz
Diameter: 60 feet
Antenna Gain: 42.5 dBi at 1 GHz (see plot)
Beam Width: 2.6°/400 Mhz, 0.7°/2 GHz
Noise Temperature: 1-2db at 400MHz total system –
Noise Figure: 0.8db at 400MHz w/ 20db LNA –

The scalar square event was captured on multiple RADAR systems including Intellicast, and the Weather Channel

http://www.intellicast.com/Local/WxMa…

https://weather.com/weather/radar/int…

A Fridge Full Of Free Food – #GoodNewsNextWeek

Source: Media Monarchy
April 11, 2016

This week on #GoodNewsNextWeek: 9/11 Truth comes roaring back on ’60 Minutes’ ahead of the 15th anniversary; a restaurant in India put a fridge outside filled with free food; and soda goes flat after 11 years of declining sales lead to a 30-year low. Notes/Links:

Story #1: A Senator Just Went on 60 Minutes Claiming the 9/11 Attackers Had “Support from Within the US”
http://bit.ly/1SuynH9

Audio: Interview w/Richard Gage of AE911Truth
http://bit.ly/1N5bvSw

Video Flashback: Portland Group Burns ‘9/11 Commission Report’ at Anniversary Gathering
http://bit.ly/1TNIiwG

Story #2: Restaurant Puts Fridge of Free Food Outside to Feed the Hungry
http://bit.ly/1RQ4Ifr

Story #3: Soda Goes Flat As Sales Fall To 30 -Year Low
http://bit.ly/1Q3GGrK

#FoodWorldOrder Flashback: Food Inflation Kept Hidden In Tinier Bags (Mar 2011)
http://bit.ly/1oSeUbS

#GoodNewsNextWeek Headlines: Florida Governor Goes Out for Corporate Coffee, Constituent Calls Him Rich A**hole
http://bit.ly/1MqxaEB

Wells Fargo to Pay $1.2 Billion to Settle Mortgage Fraud Case
http://bit.ly/1Q3GLMh

UK Younger Generations Prefer Cash
http://bit.ly/1XrRPIX

NASA Releases 3 Million Thermal Images of Our Planet Earth
http://bit.ly/1XrRPIX

How Cacti Can Clean Drinking Water
http://bit.ly/23q5IhN

Colorado Turning Food Waste Into Electricity
http://bit.ly/1Vk8SPO

Blueberries May Help Treat Shellshock
http://bit.ly/1ViOHB7

Firefighters Rescue Bear Cub from Florida Brush Fire
http://bit.ly/1TNIwnG