How About Them Apples?

Source: GizaDeathStar.com
Dr. Joseph P. Farrell Ph.D.
March 24, 2017

Over the years of watching and reporting on the GMO issue on this website, one of the things that many brought to my attention by sharing various articles and studies, is the apparent linkage between CCD (colony collapse disorder), as the populations of honey bees colonies and other pollinators have dramatically declined since the introduction of GMO foods and the heavy pesticides they involve. As a result, I have also blogged about the latest gimmick to “repair” the damage: artificial drones as pollinators. It is, after all, “no big deal” if the world’s pollinator population declines or simply goes extinct, after all, they only keep most of the world’s plant life going, and most of its food supply going. No big deal, especially if one has artificial pollinators waiting in the wings. Indeed, as I’ve previously blogged, there were scientists actually seriously proposing this as a means to get around the phenomenon of colony collapse disorder.

Well, according to this article shared by Mr. T.M., it’s now actually been accomplished:

Researchers use drone to pollinate a flower

The opening paragraphs say it all:

Researchers in Japan have successfully used a tiny drone to pollinate an actual flower, a task usually accomplished by insects and animals.

The remote-controlled drone was equipped with horsehairs coated with a special gel, which the researchers say was crucial to the process.

“This is the world’s first demonstration of pollination by an artificial robotic pollinator,” said Eijiro Miyako of the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology in Japan, one of the authors of the study, which was published in the journal Chem.

And, lest the connection between pollinator population collapse and the artificial pollinator is missed, the article itself makes the connection:

But many pollinators are under threat, particularly insects like bees and butterflies. They belong to a group — invertebrate pollinators — in which 40 percent of species face extinction, according to the same report.

The drone is an attempt to address this problem: “The global pollination crisis is a critical issue for the natural environment and our lives,” the authors wrote in the study.
There is, however, a catch: it’s still a long way from insect pollinators, due not only to the size of the drone, but due to the lack of artificial intelligence and independent movement in the artificial pollinator itself:

The peculiarity of this project is that it focuses on the pollination process, rather than the construction of a robotic bee.

As the authors note, “practical pollination has not yet been demonstrated with the aerial robots currently available.”

However, pollination was achieved on a very large flower, and the drone was not autonomous: “I believe that some form of artificial intelligence and GPS would be very useful for the development of such automatic machines in future,” said Miyako.

Much work remains to be done before we can emulate the complex behavior of insects and animals: “There is little chance this can replace pollinators,” said Christina Grozinger, Director of the Center for Pollinator Research at Penn State University.

Hidden text: “we urgently need artificial intelligence in order to construct more efficient artificial pollinators.”

And that of course, brings me to my high octane speculation of the day: suppose such artificial intelligence was constructed. And suppose, for a moment, all those artificial pollinators were under the controlled of a networked Artificial Intelligence, coordinating it all. Who is to say that said “intelligence” would even see the need for pollinator activity, or the human and animal populations that they ultimately aid in feeding? Waves of AI pollinators could conceivably become plagues of AI locusts. If this be the case, the “technological fix” could end up being an even worse nightmare.

Of course, one could always solve the problem by the simple fix of what appears to be the basis of the pollinator problem: get rid of GMOs, and let nature do what she was designed to do.

That, of course, would be far too simple, and not issue in enough research grants and profits.

Read More At: GizaDeathStar.com
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About Joseph P. Farrell

Joseph P. Farrell has a doctorate in patristics from the University of Oxford, and pursues research in physics, alternative history and science, and “strange stuff”. His book The Giza DeathStar, for which the Giza Community is named, was published in the spring of 2002, and was his first venture into “alternative history and science”.

57 Different Linked To The Rapidly Declining Bee Population

Honey bees
Source: NaturalNews.com
S. Johnson
August 11, 2016

Upwards of 57 pesticides are responsible for poisoning European honey bees and contributing to the rapidly declining bee population worldwide.

Multiple studies have confirmed that there is a strong link between herbicide use and bee deaths. Although there are various factors at play, multiple lines of research converge on herbicide use as a significant variable. So much so, that the European Union has issued a ban on the use of neonicotinoid herbicides.

A recent study focused on this link was published in the Journal of Chromatography.

Weeding through a jungle of herbicides

Researchers are faced with the challenge of trying to understand which combination of herbicides impacts honeybees in different ways. In order to examine this more quickly, researchers from the National Veterinary Research Institute in Poland have developed a way to analyze 200 pesticides at once.

“Bee health is a matter of public concern — bees are considered critically important for the environment and agriculture by pollinating more than 80% of crops and wild plants in Europe,” Tomasz Kiljanek, lead author of the study from the National Veterinary Research Institute in Poland, said in a press statement. “We wanted to develop a test for a large number of pesticides currently approved for use in the European Union to see what is poisoning the bees.”

Given the vast range of herbicides currently in use, it is hard to determine which ones are detrimental to bees. Kiljanek and his colleagues used a method known as QuEChERS – often deployed to detect the presence of herbicides in food – to investigate over 70 bee poisoning cases. Approximately 98 percent of the herbicides they analyzed were allowed to be used in the European Union.

The sting of extinction

The researchers found that 57 herbicides were present in poisoned bees. Herbicides, even in low concentrations, can impair the bees’ immune systems, enabling viruses and parasites to destroy the colony. The team hopes that their findings will broaden the knowledge of different herbicides that are dangerous to bees.

“This is just the beginning of our research on the impact of pesticides on honeybee health,” Kiljanek said.

“Honeybee poisoning incidents are the tip of the iceberg. Even at very low levels, pesticides can weaken bees’ defense systems, allowing parasites or viruses to kill the colony,” he added.

“Our results will help expand our knowledge about the influence of pesticides on honeybee health, and will provide important information for other researchers to better assess the risk connected with the mix of current used pesticides.”

Previous research centered on other factors attributed to the decline of the global bee population, like climate change and disease. It has been suggested that diesel exhaust, for example, could be altering half of the floral scents that bees use to seek flowers, which could be responsible for the death of some bees.

A United Nations alert issued last February warned that hundreds of billions of dollars worth of crops could be wasted because of the declining bee population, putting the global food supply at risk.

One out of every six species of vertebrates are facing extinction, while two out of every five bee, butterfly and pollination insects are also in grave danger, reports TechTimes.

Read More At: NaturalNews.com

Sources include:

ScienceDaily.com

ScienceDirect.com

TechTimes.com

Metro.co.uk

The GMO Scrapbook: The World-Wide Bee Die-Off Linked To The Rise Of…

 THE GMO SCRAPBOOK: THE WORLD-WIDE BEE DIE-OFF LINKED TO RISE OF ...
GizaDeathStar.com
Dr. Joseph P. Farrell
August 1, 2016

If you’ve been following the GMO labelling debate in various states, or for that matter, the pronouncements coming out of Dr. Goebbels’ Propaganda Ministry I.G. Farbensanto in Berlin Washington,  there’s absolutely no link between GMO use and rising cancer rates, falling crop yields, or the fact that world wide bees have been dying off.

But not so, according to this article shared by Mr. S.D., which highlights a recent study of the Royal Society:

We’re Getting Closer to Knowing Why Bees Are Dying Off Worldwide

Note that according to this article, there is a clear link between the rise of neonicotinoid use, falling bee sperm production, and the collapse of the world bee population, so essential to pollination and thus, to sustaining the human food supply:

But new research published Wednesday in Proceedings of the Royal Society B suggests at least one primary cause: neonicotinoid pesticides, which have been mostly banned in the European Union since 2013.

Neonicotinoid pesticides were found to have decreased the sperm count of male bees by nearly 40 percent, as well as cutting their lifespan.

Neonicotinoids have been widely used for decades, but in the past several years concerns have been raised about their environmental effects, leading to the restrictions for countries in the E.U. Other countries, including the U.S., only lightly regulate their use.

That is to say:

Neonicotinoids, it turns out, are a form of contraception for bees.

And, dare I ask, given a similar curious fall in human male sperm production rates over the past few decades, could there be a link here as well? And (to continue this line of high octane speculation) might that have been the goal all along, with bees simply being “collateral damage” from the assault on the real target?

Perhaps.

But there more here than meets the eye in this story. Back in the heady days of the administration of G.H.W. Bush and the first sprouting of the corruption we presently see in full bloom..

Continue Reading At: GizaDeathStar.com
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Profile photo of Joseph P. Farrell
Joseph P. Farrell has a doctorate in patristics from the University of Oxford, and pursues research in physics, alternative history and science, and “strange stuff”. His book The Giza DeathStar, for which the Giza Community is named, was published in the spring of 2002, and was his first venture into “alternative history and science”.

The Transhumanist Scrapbook: Part Animal Part Machine…

“The problem here isn’t confined simply to what this little creaturoid is – is it animal? machine? – the problem begins to take on moral and ethical and jurisprudential aspects when one “upscales” this to engineered robots with human brains (or brain tissue) used to form its central processors. The inevitable result will be a philosophical discussion as to whether such hybrids are indeed conscious persons, or not.”[Emphasis added]

 THE TRANSHUMANIST SCRAPBOOK: PART ANIMAL PART MACHINE ...
Source: GizaDeathStar.com
Dr. Joseph P. Farrell
July 22, 2016

It is becoming increasingly difficult to maintain pace with technology and its moral and ethical implications. Genetic engineers have already created chimerical creatures, part one species, part another, and pigs and rats and other animals have been used to grow Dr. Moreau-like “manimals”, animals growing this or that human body part; we’ve seen glow-=in-the-dark rabbits, cloned sheep, pigs with human blood, super-mice with bits of human brains able to run labyrinths faster than their ordinary counterparts; we’ve seen robots run over toddlers and even a robot killing recently (Isaac Asimov, where are you?). And of course there is the whole transhumanist movement’s advocacy of human-machine “interfaces”.

Well, this isn’t quite a human-machine interface, but the real question is, what is it? (This article was shared by many readers here):

Scientists Create Successful Biohybrid Being Using 3-D Printing and Genetic Engineering

Note that this little creaturoid (for want of a better term), was created using both genetic engineering and three-d printing. But that isn’t the problem; the problem is this:

Like most disruption, it started with a simple idea. Kit Kevin Parker, PhD, a Harvard professor researching how to build a human heart, saw his daughter entranced by watching stingrays at the New England Aquarium in Boston. He wondered if he could engineer a muscle that could move in the same sinuous, undulating fashion. The quest for a material led to creating an artificial ray with a 3-D-printed rubber body at the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences at Harvard. Scientists from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the University of Michigan, and Stanford University’s Medical Center joined the team.

They reinforced the soft rubber body with a 3-D-printed gold skeleton so thin it functions like cartilage. Geneticists adapted rat heart cells so they could respond to light by contracting. Then, they were grown in a carefully arranged pattern on the rubber and around the gold skeleton.

And of course, this all comes with the now predictable appeal for everyone to think in terms of how wonderful all this is, and of all the potential health benefits it might bring:

Science of this type is fundamental for engineering special-purpose creations such as artificial worms that sniff out and eat cancer. Or bionic body parts for those who have suffered accidents or disease. Imagine having little swimmers in your system that rush to the site of a medical emergency such as a stroke. The promise of sensor-rich soft tissue frees robots to move more easily and yet not be cut off from needed input. Sensitized robot soft tissue could perform without the energy-sucking heaviness of metal or the artificial barrier of hard-plastic exoskeletons.

Thanks to disruptive, cross-disciplinary applied science like this, entrepreneurs in the next few years will be able to play on the border of what life is, what alive means, and what life can be.

The problem here isn’t confined simply to what this little creaturoid is – is it animal? machine? – the problem begins to take on moral and ethical and jurisprudential aspects when one “upscales” this to engineered robots with human brains (or brain tissue) used to form its central processors. The inevitable result will be a philosophical discussion as to whether such hybrids are indeed conscious persons, or not. I’ve blogged about such problems before on this site, so today I want to concentrate on yet another looming issue, one brought home by GMOs:

Over the past decades, as GMOs were introduced into the food chain, we’ve seen increasing studies that have suggested that they, and their accompanying pesticides, have disrupted the complex environmental biospheres in which all life lives: it is now clear that there is some relationship between GMo introduction and colony collapse disorder in bee and other pollinator populations; declining bee and butterfly populations have been the result, as has declining yields and cost-to-productivity ratios in GMO vs non-GMO fields. There have also been studies documenting the rise of certain types of cancers correlating to the rise of the use of glyphosate, and so on.

Continue Reading At:GizaDeathStar.com
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Joseph P. Farrell has a doctorate in patristics from the University of Oxford, and pursues research in physics, alternative history and science, and “strange stuff”. His book The Giza DeathStar, for which the Giza Community is named, was published in the spring of 2002, and was his first venture into “alternative history and science”.

The GMO Scrapbook – The Strange Case Of The Bee Keeper And IG…

bees and honey

Source: GizaDeathStar.com
Dr. Joseph P. Farrell
March 24, 2016

Mr. V.T. shared this article, and it’s a whopper doozie, even though at first glance it may not seem to be too significant.

But first, a little background. Do you all recall that, beginning in the 1990s, we began to hear of the sudden fall in the populations of honey bees, first in the USSA, then in Canada, and  then in Europe?  At the time, this “colony collapse disorder” had everyone mystified: there was no apparent explanation, but everyone, myself included, knew something was amiss: we were seeing far fewer bees buzzing around our flower gardens, and, for those of us who live in more southern climes, even a drop in little hummingbirds.

So what was going on?

As the phenomenon began to be talked about – largely on alternative media and talk shows such as the USA’s “Coast to Coast AM,” some people began to connect it with the rise, at around the same time, of GMOs and their acocmpanying glyphosphate herbicide. And one bee keeper noticed the same thing, and decided to investigate:

Continue Reading At: GizaDeathStar.com

57 Pesticides Named as Cause for Bee Deaths in Europe

bees and honey
Source: NaturalSociety.com
Christina Sarich
March 22, 2016

More than 1000 pesticides are used in the US, and who knows how many of these have contributed to colony collapse disorder, the strange and sudden death of one of our most important pollinating species – bees. In a new study released by researchers in Poland, 57 specific pesticides have been named for poisoning bees.

The study published in the Journal of Chromatography by researchers from Poland’s National Veterinary Institute utilized a new test that allowed them to analyze exactly which of the 200 pesticides licensed for use in the EU were contributing to honeybee deaths.

Lead author Tomasz Kiljanek said:

“Bee health is a matter of public concern. Bees are considered critically important for the environment and agriculture by pollinating more than 80 percent of crops and wild plants in Europe. We wanted to develop a test for a large number of pesticides currently approved for use in the European Union to see what is poisoning the bees.”

The researchers narrowed it down to 57 pesticides with an undeniable link to bee demise. Using a method called QuEChERS, more commonly used to find pesticide residues in food, the research tool can simultaneously test for 200 pesticides as well as the compounds that are formed when pesticides break down.

This allows researchers to determine which pesticides are to blame, whether they are in their original form, and whether they have broken down in the environment or in the bees’ bodily systems.

Continue Reading At: NaturalSociety.com