Moms Speak Out About Genetically Modified Foods [GMOs]

Source: InstituteForResponsibleTechnology
November 23, 2016

No mother ever knowingly risks her child’s health. Hear what these mothers have to say about their experience with genetically modified foods.

Frankincense Oil Kills Cancer Cells While Boosting The Immune System, Studies Show

Frankincense
Source: NaturalNews.com
David Gutierrez
July 27, 2016

Frankincense is a powerful medicinal oil that can not only boost the immune system but also kill cancer cells, a number of studies have shown.

One of the most significant recent studies was conducted by researchers from the University of Leicester, England, in 2013. The researchers found that the naturally occurring frankincense compound acetyl-11-keto-beta-boswellic acid (AKBA) targeted and destroyed ovarian cancer cells. The findings were particularly significant because they showed that AKBA had this effect even in late-stage ovarian cancer patients, not just in laboratory trials performed on isolated cells.

“Frankincense is taken by many people with no known side effects,” lead researcher Kamla Al-Salmani said. This finding has enormous potential to be taken to a clinical trial in the future and developed into an additional treatment for ovarian cancer.”

Kills cancer and reduces radiation side effects

The Leicester findings build on a large and still growing body of evidence that frankincense and its compounds have powerful immune-boosting and cancer-fighting benefits.

A study published in BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine in 2009, for example, found that the herbal form of frankincense triggered death in bladder cancer cells by activating several different cellular pathways. Another study, conducted by researchers from Nihon University in Tokyo and published in Biological and Pharmaceutical Bulletin, showed that several chemical components of frankincense were able to kill three separate human neuroblastoma cell lines. The same study also found that frankincense inhibited the growth of Epstein-Barr virus.

Neuroblastoma is a type of cancer that forms in nerve cells and primarily affects young children. Other studies have shown that frankincense and its components can kill cancers of the brain, breast, colon, pancreas, prostate and stomach.

Frankincense may also help mitigate the often-debilitating side effects of cancer treatment. One study, published in the journal Cancer in 2011, was performed on brain cancer patients experiencing cerebral edema (swelling) as a side effect of radiation therapy. The researchers found that 60 percent of participants given frankincense experienced a 75 percent reduction in cerebral swelling, a potent enough result for the authors to recommend frankincense as a potential alternative to steroids, the current favored treatment. Side effects of steroids can include headaches, blurred vision and migraines.

All-around immune booster

Frankincense’s cancer-fighting benefits seem to come, in part, from its potent effects on the immune system. One study, conducted by researchers from Baylor University Medical Center, found that acts upon the expression of genes that help regulate the immune system, leading to cancer cell death. Another study, published in Phytotherapy Research, found that mice given frankincense exhibited increases in several key markers of immune function, primarily levels of white blood cells (lymphocytes) and anti-inflammatory activity.

Numerous studies have confirmed frankincense as a powerful anti-inflammatory. This, along with its other immune-boosting properties, may in part explain its usefulness in fighting infection and in treating autoimmune conditions such as asthma, rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

Frankincense can also be used to heal skin, including from acne and scarring, and can reduce anxiety levels.

If you wish to incorporate frankincense as a regular natural hBealth booster, it can be taken as an undiluted essential oil on the skin or as a few drops under the tongue. It can also be diffused and breathed in for respiratory conditions. Frankincense can also be purchased and consumed in powdered capsule form.

There are numerous species of frankincense, including Boswellia carteri, B. serrata and B. sacra. All three of these species have shown powerful anti-cancer effects in scientific tests.

B. carteri, native to east Africa, has been the species most heavily studied. B. sacra, also known as “sacred frankincense,” was until recently restricted to use by the Saudi royal household, and could only be purchased in Oman. Recently, however, a distillery opened up in Oman to produce essential oil of B. sacra for public sale.

Read More At: NaturalNews.com

Sources for this article include:
http://blogs.naturalnews.com
https://draxe.com/frankincense-oil-cancer/
http://www.naturalnews.com/025892_cancer_frankincense_oil.html

Study: This Activity may Cut Your Risk of 13 Types of Cancer

girl running

Source: NaturalSociety.com
Julie Fidler
May 23, 2016

Cancer deaths are decreasing worldwide, but new cases are on the rise as the world’s population ages and obesity continues to explode. Yet if everyone made an effort to get more physical activity, even just a little bit, we’d see those numbers start to come down.

Earlier this month, a massive study involving 1.44 million people was published in JAMA Internal Medicine that revealed a connection between comparatively higher levels of physical activity and lower risk of developing 13 types of cancer.

The strongest effect was seen for esophageal cancer, with 42% lower risk. Physical activity was found to lower liver cancer risk by 27%, leukemia risk by 20%, and breast cancer risk by 10%. Overall, increased physical activity was associated with a 7% lower risk of developing any type of cancer. [1]

Although exercise lowered the risk of lung cancer by 26%, this effect was found, oddly enough, only in current and former smokers rather than in the total study group.

Exercise has been known to cut the risk of heart disease and death from all causes for decades. Steven C. Moore of the National Cancer Institute and colleagues set out to determine whether physical activity had the same type of effect on cancer risk and, if so, which types of cancer risk it reduced.

For the study, the team analyzed data from 12 U.S. and European study groups in which participants self-reported their physical activity between 1987 and 2004. The researchers looked at the incidence of 26 types of cancer occurring in the study follow-up period, which lasted an average of 11 years.

The study focused on leisure-time activity – done according to each participant’s own schedule for improving or maintaining fitness or health. The researchers tallied participants’ reports of moderate and vigorous activities, such as walking, running, and swimming. The team also tracked the participants’ weekly amount of physical activity. Walking for 150 minutes per week, which meets many physical activity guidelines, was an average level of effort.

The authors of the study also noted that diet and other factors may have affected the results. Faulty recall by the participants could have affected the tally of self-reported activities, for example.

One finding of the study came as a shock to Moore and his colleagues: physical activity was linked to a 5% increased risk of non-advanced prostate cancer. The team wrote:

“There is no known biological rationale to explain this association.”

The researchers said it was possible that early-stage prostate cancer was more likely to be found in physically active men simply because they’re more likely to undergo screening for it – whereas non-active men are less likely to want the screening. [1]

people running

The study found that even a few hours of physical activity per week shrank the risk of breast, colon, and lung cancer – three of the four major cancers that affect people in the United States.

And, according to Moore, your cancer risk doesn’t appear to level off or increase as you get more physical activity. There is no “plateau” – it just keeps declining.

“The more activity, the more the benefit. As people did more, their risk continued to lower.”

Those who exercised the most had:

  • A 23% lower risk of kidney cancer
  • A 22% lower risk of stomach cancer
  • A 21% lower risk of endometrial cancer
  • A 20% lower risk of myeloid leukemia
  • A 17% lower risk of myeloma
  • A 16% lower risk of colon cancer
  • A 15% lower risk of head and neck cancer
  • A 13% lower risk of rectal cancer
  • A 13% lower risk of bladder cancer
  • A 10% lower risk of breast cancer [2]Continue Reading AT: Naturalsociety.com