The Education And Employment Myth: Almost Two-Thirds Of People In The Labor Force Do Not Have A College Degree

Source: MyBudget360.com
April 10, 2016

There is an ongoing perception that most of the workforce has a college degree.  When we say college degree we mean at a minimum a bachelor’s degree.  You would think that with $1.3 trillion in student debt outstanding a good portion of the work force would be college educated.  The opposite is the truth however.  Almost two-thirds of the workforce does not have a college degree.  That might be surprising to you especially for a country that pushes nearly everyone into college.  Yet this blind pushing of people into college has created problems for those choosing careers and paths that simply lead into more debt and very little marketable skills.  It is also a case where the younger workforce is more educated but also more indebted.  They are paying more for their education and their incomes are simply showing paltry gains.  This is why talks of the minimum wage are actually bigger than you think.  Many people are what we would consider “working poor” even though the media fails to acknowledge real inflation that is hurting the standard of living.  So how does this look on a nationwide scale?

No college for workers

I think the figures are rather surprising for many here:

“(EPI) Almost two-thirds of people in the labor force (65.1 percent) do not have a college degree. In fact, people without a college degree (which includes those without a high school degree, with a high school degree, some college education, and an associates’ degrees) make up the majority of the labor force in every state but the District of Columbia. Mississippi has the highest share of non-college educated workers (75.7 percent) while Massachusetts and the District of Columbia have the lowest shares (51 percent and 33.7 percent, respectively).”

Of course the distribution isn’t evenly distributed across the country:

labor force and college degrees

I believe the above is a big reason why so many Americans living in affluent metro areas are completely removed from the economic plight of most Americans.  Some are pushed into states with much lower standards of living and the dialogue is simply nonexistent with wealthier areas.  The media unfortunately caters to the elite markets and simply ignores the large masses of people that are getting by.  We have nearly 94 million adult Americans that are not in the labor force.  Think about that.  Nearly one-third of our adult population isn’t generating income.

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