From Tomb To Table: Cumin Health Benefit’s Rediscovered

Source: TheSleuthJournal
Sayer Ji
January 3, 2017

Traded along spice routes separating ancient cultures by vast distances, spices like cumin were once worth their weight in gold. Has modern science now revealed why, beyond their remarkable aesthetic value, they were so highly prized? 

Many spices are perfectly happy living a charmed life as seasonings, peppering things generously with flavor, and without ever arousing the suspicion that they may be capable of profound acts of healing, as well.

Meet cumin, a member of the parsley family, which is to say from a well-known family of healers native to the central Mediterranean region (southern Italy, Algeria and Tunisia).

Cumin’s traditional use stretches back into prehistory, as evidenced by its presence in Egyptian tombs. The Greeks actually used it much like we use pepper today, keeping cumin at the dining table in its own container, which is still practiced by Moroccans to this day. It is also been used for millennia in India as a traditional ingredient of curry.

New research now indicates that these ancient “culinary” uses, once considered primarily aesthetic in nature, may have served more fundamental medicinal roles in these cultures. How do we know this? Modern scientific investigation has revealed that cumin has a broad range of potential healing properties that, when properly applied, could alleviate human suffering.

For instance, as recently as 2010, research published in the journal Food Chemistry and Toxicology demonstrated that cumin has blood sugar lowering properties comparable to the drug glibenclamide (known in the US as glyburide), with the additional benefit (not conferred by pharmaceutical intervention) that it also lowered oxidative stress and inhibited the advanced glycated end products (AGE) which are implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic microvascular complications.[i]

Remarkably, this is only the tip of cumin’s medicinal potential. There are at least 10 other potential medicinal properties of cumin now confirmed in the experimental literature:

  • Bacterial Infections: Cumin oil has been shown effective at killing Klebsiella penumoniae bacteria, including decreasing biofilm formation (a defense mechanism of bacteria against antibiotics), as well as enhancing the antimicrobial activity of conventional antibiotic drugs like ciprofloxacin.[ii] Even more impressive, perhaps, cumin oil has been shown to have anti-MRSA properties.[iii]
  • Candida (Yeast) Infection: Unlike conventional antibiotics which contribute to opportunistic fungal overgrowth, cumin has been shown to have considerable inhibitory activity against 3 different Candida albicans strains of yeast.[iv] It has also been studied to be effective against a wide range of other fungi and yeasts, including Aspergilli and dermatophytes (fungi that cause skin diseases).[v]
  • Cataracts: Cumin has been shown to delay the formation of diabetes-associated cataracts primarily through its anti-glycating properties, i.e. it prevents elevated blood sugar from getting “sticky” (i.e. caramelization) and subsequently damaging tissues in the body.[vi]
  • Cancers: Cumin has been shown in preclinical research to have inhibitory activity against cervical cancer[vii] and colon cancer. [viii]
  • Dental Plaque: Cumin oil has been shown effective as an anti-gingival agent alternative to the chemical chlorhexidine commonly used in mouthwashes.[ix]
  • Diabetes: As mentioned in our opening, cumin has significant anti-diabetic properties. Another 2002 study found that the treatment of diabetic rats with cumin was more effective than the drug glibenclamide, resulting in reductions in inflammation, fatty changes, tissue cholesterol, triglycerides, free fatty acids, blood glucose and glycated hemoglobin – all positive indicators. [x]
  • Food-borne Pathogens – Cumin oil has been found to work synergistically with other food preservation agents to inhibit the growth of food-borne pathogens.[xi]
  • Immune Function: Cumin has been found to effectively stimulate immune function in a way that may benefit immune-compromised individuals.[xii]
  • Fertility (Reversible Contraceptive): Cumin has been found to have potent contraceptive activities in male rats without apparent toxicity.[xiii]
  • Memory Disorders: Cumin has been found to reduce stress-induced oxidative changes in the brain, as well as improving cognition, as determined by acquisition, retention and recovery in rats, in a dose-dependent manner.[xiv]
  • Morphine Dependence/Tolerance: Cumin reduces morphine tolerance and dependence. [xv] [xvi]
  • Osteoporosis: Cumin extract has been shown effective at reversing bone loss associated with the loss of ovarian function at least as well as estradiol.[xvii]
  • Thrombosis (Clot): Cumin seed has been demonstrated to inhibit platelet aggregation, indicating it may prevent pathological blood clotting.[xviii] [Note: of course this means that it could interact adversely with blood thinners].

The evidence-based approach to understanding cumin’s medicinal value is relatively new. Only in the past two decades, but especially in the past five years, scientific research on spices and culinary herbs has virtually exploded. While enlightening, we must remember that the approach is limited in a number of ways. For one, it relies on animal research, which is both inherently cruel (vivisection) and conveys only approximate data, as these substances often have very different effects in animals than humans.

Also, spices like cumin should not be considered in isolation, as traditional recipes passed down from generation to generation contained a vast storehouse of medically relevant information pertaining to the synergies inherent in combinations of ingredients, modes of preparation, seasonal harvesting, etc. In other words, cumin does not lend itself well to the pharmacological, drug-based model of medicine, which presumes there are monochemical “magic bullets” within complex herbs or spices that must be identified and isolated into megadoses, and which are primarily responsible for their beneficial effects.

Nonetheless, it is welcoming that increasingly science confirms traditional herbalism and culinary practice. Perhaps, as the scientific evidence continues to pour in, we will be more willing to give ourselves permission to appreciate once again the wondrous superfluity of nature, its ceaseless benevolence, and the the fact that issuing directly from her fecund soil, are powerful healing gifts, that we can enjoy sensually, viscerally and now intellectually with greater abandon.


Resources

  • [iv] Juergen Wanner, Stefanie Bail, Leopold Jirovetz, Gerhard Buchbauer, Erich Schmidt, Velizar Gochev, Tanya Girova, Teodora Atanasova, Albena Stoyanova. Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of cumin oil (Cuminum cyminum, Apiaceae). Nat Prod Commun. 2010 Sep ;5(9):1355-8. PMID: 20922990

© January 3, 2017 GreenMedInfo LLC. This work is reproduced and distributed with the permission of GreenMedInfo LLC. Want to learn more from GreenMedInfo? Sign up for the newsletter here http://www.greenmedinfo.com/greenmed/newsletter.

Read More At: SleuthJournal.com

Big Pharma Finds New Use For Statins In Cancer Patients, After Large Study Reveals The Drug’s Benefits Were 100% Fabricated

Statins
Source: NaturalNews.com
David Gutierrez
July 19, 2016

As the consensus about statins as cholesterol-lowering “miracle drugs” starts to crack, Big Pharma is doubtless looking for ways to preserve the profitability of the top-earning drug class of all time. Now, a new study in the journal Breast Cancer Research may indicate how statins will soon be marketed: as anti-cancer drugs.

The study was released shortly after yet another study challenging the effectiveness of statins, this one in the journal BMJ Open.

“Lowering cholesterol with medications for primary cardiovascular prevention in those aged over 60 is a total waste of time and resources, whereas altering your lifestyle is the single most important way to achieve a good quality of life,” said researcher Professor Sherif Sultan of the University of Ireland.

Higher cholesterol, longer life!

For the BMJ Open study, a team of international researchers reviewed prior studies conducted on nearly 70,000 people. They found that among people over the age of 60, having higher levels of LDL (“bad”) cholesterol was not actually associated with earlier death. In fact, 92 percent of those with high LDL cholesterol actually lived longer than people with lower levels.

“Older people with high … levels [of] the so-called ‘bad’ cholesterol, lived longer and had less heart disease,” co-author Dr. Malcolm Kendrick said.

The study undermines the idea that high blood cholesterol leads to heart disease. That’s why rather than artificially lowering cholesterol with drugs, people should use lifestyle methods such as improved diet and exercise, and quitting smoking, which have actually been proven to lower heart disease risk and lengthen life.

The findings led the researchers to conclude that that “the benefits from statin treatment have been exaggerated.” That was also the conclusion of a 2015 review in the Expert Review of Clinical Pharmacology, which found that statins actually only lowered heart disease risk by 1 percent, not the 36 to 54 percent reported by drug companies. The study also found that media reports consistently ignored high rates of serious side effects.

“Increased rates of cancer, cataracts, diabetes, cognitive impairments and musculoskeletal disorders more than offset the modest cardiovascular benefits of statin treatment,” those researchers wrote.

Will cancer patients now get cancer-causing statins?

With the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology recommending that one-third of U.S. adults take statins, these blockbuster drugs aren’t going away anytime soon. But just in case some patients and doctors start to grow too skeptical, Big Pharma and its backers are getting the next big statin use ready: as a cancer treatment.

The new Breast Cancer Research study, conducted by scientists from Aston University, found that cancer patients with the highest cholesterol levels were least likely to die from the disease. Instead of drawing the obvious conclusion from this research – that cholesterol, an essential nutrient, might play a role in helping the body fight cancer – the researchers instead concluded that cholesterol-lowering statins must be responsible! This conclusion raises the question of why, if the statins were doing their jobs, these patients had such high cholesterol levels at all.

Certain studies have indeed suggested that cholesterol may play a role in “fueling” certain forms of cancer, but early studies also linked high cholesterol with heart disease and cardiovascular mortality. And given how ardently statins were embraced as a miracle cure for heart disease and how the shine is going off those hopes, proclamations of the same drugs as miracle cancer cures seem premature, if not downright disingenuous – particularly since cancer is one of the proven side effects of statin use.

A good diet is still one of the single most effective ways to avoid both heart disease and cancer. Boost your diet and stay healthy with Organic Hemp Juvenate, a blend of organic hemp protein powder and other superfoods designed to nourish your entire body.

Read More At: NaturalNews.com