Breakaway Ruminations #5 – How TV Robs You Of Life & Valuable Time

TV

TheBreakaway
Zy Marquiez
March 10, 2017

“There is a vitality, a life force, an energy, a quickening that is translated through you into action, and because there is only one of you in all time, this expression is unique. And if you block it, it will never exist through any other medium and will be lost.”
—Martha Graham

Individuals go on through their lives, following their daily endeavors in many different fashions.  People from all walks of life take a variety of paths which follows what they see as best choice in their life.  The one commonality that we each have individually is that we are blessed to have ample amount of time.

Time is quite an interesting concept.  As a thought-form, time brings about a kaleidoscope of different ideas.  Time is often correlated with work, appointments, deadlines, key dates, precious moments, and many other instances.  Because of this, time is valued to some extent by everyone, even if we don’t inherently ruminate upon this regularly.

Curiously though, because we are lucky enough as individuals to have a lot of time, we often have blatant disregard for it in one sense or another.  Everyone, including myself, usually takes time for granted because most people live long lives and we are lucky to have it every day.

Speaking of time, the average person watches 5 hours of TV per day with some watching even more than that.  At 5 hours per day, that amounts to 1,825 hours per year. That is 18250 hours per decade, and 91,250 hours per 50 years. That’s a lot of time! Over the course of 50 years, the total amount of time spent watching TV daily amounts to 3802 consecutive 24-hour days over that span.  Or “just” 5 hours a day, for 50 years.

For the sake of simplicity, let us assume most of us happen to get 8 hours a day sleeping. In an entire 168 hour work-week where the average person spends 56 hours a week sleeping, and 40 hours a week working, that leaves one with 72 hours free. If one were to spend 35 hours a week viewing television, then that would leave 37 hours of free time. That’s nearly half of all of one’s available time spent watching television. That seems ludicrous, does it not?  That doesn’t even begin to cover other activities individuals may carry out.

The point of bringing this is up is that, even though many people tend to think they “don’t have any time” to do constructive things [i.e. take better care of their health], my rebuttal to that is that, in fact most [if not all] do.  Even the busiest people on earth can learn to rearrange their schedules to be more efficient, especially if time is being used watching TV or meandering about aimlessly online.

Everyone will have different reasons for how they individually spend their time, and how much time they spend doing what they do, and that’s really their own business.  This post isn’t about judging people, but about self-analysis and ruminating upon the possibility of addressing misconception of individuals not having enough time, which seems to be an illusion to certain extent.

Ponder this: what would you do if you only had one month left to live?  Think about it seriously.

The fact this post is being read by you shows that by that very fact you have lived many years, and yet not all species have that opportunity, or are that lucky.  Some animals, in fact, do not live long at all, when compared to human years.

Butterflies, on average, only live one month.  Their entire life span narrows onto one month.  Sure, many will say that “but they’re a different species” and “time is relative” and those assertions would be right, but one thing is sure: even with magnitudes more of free time than butterflies, nearly half of all free time seems to be wasted, unless for some odd reason watching TV is so valuable that one need invest nigh half of all their free time doing it.

Let’s ruminate further.  Think about when someone presses pause on a movie.  Think upon that for a really long time.  After quite a while, wouldn’t the screen seem lifeless, like there’s nothing going on?  No movement, no change – nothing.  For one to notice the signatures of life there has to be change, motion, cycles, ebbs and flows and much more.

Now, when someone sits on a couch, for hours, days on end, doesn’t it seem antithetical to the very nature of all living organisms?  Doesn’t life move?  Doesn’t life experience?  Doesn’t life change?  If sitting nigh half your time, which is extremely bad for your health for what it’s worth and ironically robs you of your time, is to be seen as a symbol for life, then what does that say of a large portion of society?

Our ancestors conquered movement, doing incredible things that most people couldn’t imagine now days.  But these days, not only do some people “have no time,” but they don’t even exercise when their health depends on it.  Was guilty of this myself at a time, but no more.

Thankfully, life gave me a few chances to be able to learn from past mistakes, and after severe bouts with disease I took control of my life, instead of letting life control me.

My main thought at the time was: what would I do if 50 years from now, when looking back at life with one foot out the door, someone told me I had wasted thousands of hours throughout my life?  I know I’d have an ocean of regret, if not more.  That would crush my soul even more than the fact that I was going to miss those I loved very much.  I would be thinking how much more time I could have had with the people I loved.  I would do anything – ANYTHING – for merely one more hour, or even minutes when my loved ones.

Being able to spend one more moment with someone you love is precious.  Imagine being able to spend hundreds of hours more, or even thousands, over the course of a lifetime?

Why wait, and why not start now?

After all, the time is there for the taking.

And we all have it.  Until we don’t.

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This article is free and open source. You have permission to republish this article under a Creative Commons license with attribution to Zy Marquiez and TheBreakaway.wordpress.com.

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Breakaway Ruminations #1 – New Year; New Possibilities

future
TheBreakaway
Zy Marquiez
January 4, 2017

“The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams.”
– Eleanor Roosevelt

“I like the dreams of the future better than the history of the past.”
– Thomas Jefferson

Every year, as the New Year approaches, one can sense excitement building in the atmosphere.  In many instances, this type of emotion/feeling can at times be so substantial it resonates in others.

This excitement takes place in large part due to individuals getting ready to create significant changes in their lives; changes that will be for the better.

However, what seems quite intriguing about these circumstances is that often times many people choose to wait to make changes after the new year begins, even though they know they would reap rewards with those changes now. If change is to take place [positive, meaningful & needed changes at that] why don’t individuals make changes immediately?  After all, if the benefits are to be beneficial, why not venture into the realm of change sooner?

We are all guilty of this idea to some extent, and it seems quite paradoxical that people would see new ‘resolutions’ as positive, but yet hold themselves back from them until the ‘official clock’ changes.  Why not change your own clock?  Why not dance to your own tune?

Regardless of the reasons, when the New Year begins hope is in the air, individuals have an extra spring in their step, and the vibe is totally different.

If you go to the gym, the first day of the year is hands down the busiest day of the year.   In this respect, as someone who shares similar goals and as an observer of this circumstance for many years, it’s great to witness individuals do the best for themselves and starting out strong.  Problem is that, in many ways our resolutions often dissipate into our past habits much of the time.

Still though, every new year, more and more people end up bringing about better change for themselves, and this is quite refreshing.  Be it in search for better health, relationships, personal growth, or other, individuals that keep pushing themselves to breakaway from the conventional box we’ve been offered from youth often keep chugging along relentlessly regardless of time, circumstances or obstacles.  These individuals make obstacles their daily bread.

Moreover, other individuals that get to see positive changes in others that breakaway from the conventional narrative gain confidence and belief in many ways as they see their friends or acquaintances succeed in new endeavours.  This doesn’t often directly correlate into success for these folks, but it sure helps in them seeing what’s possible.

And at minimum, the future will always hold the option to be the jump-off point if any individual ever decides to light off into the horizon.  That’s one great reason the future appeals to everyone, but there’s more.

The future offers us energy, possibilities and wonder.

The future is the untraveled road, ready to be paved by the individual – you.

The future is everything we wished for, and more, but only if we make it happen.

The future is the shining star that’s yet to shine upon a new horizon.

The future is a compass pointing in a new direction; a new course to make berth too.

The future is ultimately a blank canvas, and that’s why we all love it.

And yet, the future is every single day, every new hour and every new minute.  The future doesn’t stop and wait for the New Year just because that’s what we’ve been taught to do.

The future, like a blank canvas, is always ready to be filled in.

Knowing that, why not make every new day your ‘New Year?  Why not make every day your gateway?

The beauty of this conundrum is that it’s only a choice.

Thankfully, the future – our individual blank canvas – is always there.

And always will be, ready for that moment when the choice is made.

That said, let’s end with this gem from Mattie Stepanek:

“Keep all special thoughts and memories for lifetimes to come.  Share these keepsakes with others to inspire hope and build from the past, which can bridge to the future.”