Who needs meds? Simple potassium may lower blood pressure more safely than prescription drugs

Image: Who needs meds? Simple potassium may lower blood pressure more safely than prescription drugs

Source:NaturalNews.com
Russel Davis
April 14, 2017

Eating foods high in potassium — such as fruits, vegetables, grains and roots — may help lower blood pressure levels, a recent analysis revealed. According to the review, higher dietary potassium intake was associated with significant reductions in blood pressure regardless of sodium intake. Data also show that high potassium consumption curbs blood pressure by using sodium to closely regulate potassium levels in the blood, which is crucial for normal heart, nerve and muscle function.

“Decreasing sodium intake is a well-established way to lower blood pressure. But evidence suggests that increasing dietary potassium may have an equally important effect on hypertension…When dietary potassium is high, kidneys excrete more salt and water, which increases potassium excretion. Eating a high potassium diet is like taking a diuretic,” said lead researcher Prof. Alicia McDonough, ScienceDaily.com reports. Prof. McDonough is a Professor of Cell and Neurobiology at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California.

However, the lead researcher cautioned that increasing dietary potassium intake may be challenging as our ancient ancestors evolved to crave sodium. Modern diets have also shown a drastic change, with food companies adding salt to satisfy this craving.”If you eat a typical Western diet. your sodium intake is high and your potassium intake is low. This significantly increases your chances of developing high blood pressure,” Prof. McDonough added.

The findings were published in the American Journal of Physiology — Endocrinology and Metabolism.

Dietary potassium vs. prescription drugs

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), high blood pressure or hypertension is the cause of 51 percent of stroke-related deaths and 45 percent of heart disease-related deaths worldwide. A vast number of studies have previously confirmed that dietary potassium may effectively regulate blood pressure levels. For instance, a 2015 study showed that higher dietary potassium levels helped maintain a healthy blood pressure level in girls throughout adolescence. “The beneficial effects of dietary potassium on both systolic and diastolic blood pressures suggest that consuming more potassium-rich foods during childhood may help suppress the adolescent increase in blood pressure,” the researchers wrote, JAMA Network.com reports. The results were published in JAMA Pedriatrics. 

A review published in the journal Hypertension also showed that dietary potassium may act as a diuretic and reduce extracellular fluid volume, which in turn may help lower blood pressure levels. The review also found that potassium can influence the activity of the renin-angiotensin system and decrease angiotensin markers on vascular, adrenal, or renal receptors. Researchers also found that dietary potassium helps reduce blood pressure levels by relaxing vascular smooth muscles and curbing peripheral vascular resistance.

In contrast, a 2010 study found that using antihypertensive drugs to lower blood pressure levels may do more harm than good. Researchers said various antihypertensive drugs were found to induce different adverse conditions. Thiazide diuretics were known to cause erectile dysfunction and severe hyponatremia, while angiotension-converting enzyme inhibitors were found to cause severe hypotension, neutropenia, and proteinuria. ACEs were also associated with the onset of renal failure, hyperkalemia and angioedema.

In addition, angiotension II receptor blockers were shown to cause abnormal liver function, lower hemoglobin levels, and renal impairment as well as pharyngitis, muscle cramp and myalgia. More serious side effects such as renovascular hypertension, cardiac failure, and cirrhosis were also associated with the drug. Beta-blockers were linked to diarrhea, bronchospam, hypotension, and altered glucose and lipid metabolism. This type of hypertensive was also associated with heart failure, heart block, abnormal vision, and erectile dysfunction. Calcium channel blockers were linked to pulmonary edema, peripheral edema and worse myocardial ischema. Other side effects associated with calcium channel blockers digital dysesthesia, nausea, and muscle cramps. The results were published in the International Journal of PharmTech Research.

Sources: 

ScienceDaily.com

UPI.com

JAMANetwork.com

NCBI.NLM.NIH.gov

Sphinxsai.com

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iHealth News: Pet Studies & Child Health | Yoga | Nutrition & More

Source: iHealthTube.com
April 14, 2017

Can you eat your way to a healthy blood pressure? Find out what foods can help. Also learn about the benefits of having a pet for your infant and what benefits yoga is now showing for a certain group of men!

Watch This Before Your Next Doctor’s Appointment!

Source: iHealthTube.com
August 31, 2016

Are you doing the right thing by visiting your doctor to help treat a condition? We think we are, but what if that doctor, despite their best efforts, sends you down the wrong path? Dr. Peter Glidden discusses the basics of what’s wrong with visiting your doctor to fix a common condition like high blood pressure or heartburn. Find out what those doctors answers are and what they really should be doing. Watch this before your next doctor’s appointment!

The Incredible Health Benefits of Berries

The Incredible Health Benefits of Berries

Source: GreenMedInfo.com
Valerie Burke, MSM
November 2, 2015

How can one food group offer so many incredible health benefits, from preventing heart attack, stroke and dementia to protecting you from the flu? The answer is phytonutrients, and berries are simply loaded. Reading this “berry primer” will have you snatching them by the handfuls.

As the rock stars of the fruit kingdom, berries are some of the most disease preventive foods on the planet, coveted by our hunter-gatherer ancestors for millennia. Modern science is now revealing why these little red and purple beauties have been so revered—their high levels of polyphenols and other nutrients provide health benefits from head to toe.

Berries boost your immunity and calm inflammation because they’re packed so full of antioxidants, vitamins and fiber—in fact, they contain some of the highest antioxidant levels of all foods. Berries protect your heart and brain and slow down aging—and they’re a cancer cell’s worst nightmare. They’re also lower in sugar than most other fruits so less likely to destabilize your insulin.

You may have heard references to polyphenols, flavonoids, flavanols, anthocyanins, and other technical terms. These can be confusing, so before we get into health benefits, let’s review some basic berry nomenclature to build a foundation for your appreciation.

Phytochemicals 101

A berry is scientifically defined as a fleshy fruit produced by the ovary of a single flower, which includes fruits not commonly considered berries such as grapes, bananas, tomatoes, cucumbers, and eggplants—but excluding strawberries and raspberries. Although various horticultural camps disagree about what constitutes a berry, this article will focus on the common culinary classification, what we see at the market labeled as “berries.”

The naturally occurring compounds primarily responsible for berries’ nutritional value are the following:

·      Phytochemicals (sometimes called phytonutrients) are naturally occurring plant compounds with protective or disease preventive properties. The thousands of phytochemicals are divided into three categories: phenolic acids (which are polyphenols), flavonoids, and stilbenes/lignans.[1]

·      Polyphenols are the most abundant natural antioxidants in our food supply. Examples include resveratrol (grapes), ellagic acid (nuts and berries), capsaicin (hot peppers), epigallocatechin gallate or EGCG (green tea), quercetin, tannins, and diferuloylmethanes (found only in turmeric).[2]

·      Flavonoids are the most diverse group of polyphenols (there are 4,000!). Flavonoids are what give berries and other fruits and veggies their vibrant colors, as well as stellar antioxidant properties. Plants produce flavonoids to protect themselves from parasites, oxidative injury and harsh climatic conditions. Flavonoids benefit more than 200 different diseases with 79 different pharmaceutical actions, including cardioprotective, neuroprotective and antineoplastic. Flavonoids are divided in several subclasses, including flavanols (includes catechins and proanthrocyanidins), flavones, isoflavones (soy), and anthocyanins.

·      Anthocyanins are pigments giving plants (including berries) their deep red, purple and blue colors. The darker the berry, the more anthocyanin it contains. This pigment has significant cardioprotective, neuroprotective and antitumor properties, as well as many others.

Berries and Your Heart

One of the most remarkable gifts from berries is the protection they afford your heart, which results mostly from their anthocyanin content. Anthocyanins support the endothelial lining of your circulatory system by improving blood pressure, reducing oxidative stress and inflammation, enhancing capillary strength, inhibiting platelet formation, and preventing the buildup of arterial plaque.

One in three US adults now has high blood pressure,[3] and multiple studies show the benefits of blueberries for blood pressure and overall heart health. A study published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics[4] involving high-risk postmenopausal women found that consuming one cup of blueberries daily for eight weeks reduced blood pressure and arterial stiffness, possibly due to increased nitric oxide production.

Women who consume more than three servings of blueberries and strawberries per week were found to have a 32 percent lower risk of heart attack. One cup of mixed berries per day has been shown to lower blood pressure and raise beneficial HDL. Blueberries offer additional protection from type 2 diabetes by stabilizing blood sugar levels and improving insulin sensitivity. In a scientific review of the cardioprotective benefits of anthocyanins, researchers wrote:[5]

“Epidemiological studies suggest that increased consumption of anthocyanins lowers the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), the most common cause of mortality among men and women.

Anthocyanins frequently interact with other phytochemicals, exhibiting synergistic biological effects but making contributions from individual components difficult to decipher. Over the past 2 decades, many peer-reviewed publications have demonstrated that in addition to their noted in vitro antioxidant activity, anthocyanins may regulate different signaling pathways involved in the development of CVD.”

This is Your Brain on Berries…

Berries are some of the best foods you can eat to lower your risk for Alzheimer’s disease and other neurological disorders. A Chinese study[6] found the incidence of dementia (Alzheimer’s, vascular and other forms) was more than 500 percent higher for those who did not consume berries on a regular basis. A team of international researchers reviewed the science of berries’ neuroprotective effects and drew the following conclusions:[7]

Berries significantly reduce the risk for multiple types of dementia

·      Strawberries decrease oxidation and build neurological health

·      Bilberries protect against arterial and neural damage

·      Black currants discourage the formation of beta-amyloid plaques, which are common in dementia

·      Blueberries are associated with improved memory and learning, as well as reduced radical oxidation species that harm brain cells

The benefits of strawberries for your brain is at least partly explained by a recently discovered compound called fisetin, a flavonol similar to quercetin that’s found in strawberries and several other fruits and vegetables. Research published in Aging Cell[8] found fisetin prevented mice who were programmed to develop Alzheimer’s disease from actually developing it. Pamela Maher’s research team identified numerous ways in which fisetin works on metabolic pathways to reduce age-related cognitive decline, including raising intracellular glutathione levels and reducing brain inflammation, all of which she summarized in a 2009 paper.[9]

If you’re simply feeling blue, maybe you need to EAT more blue! Low dopamine levels can result in depression and other mood disturbances, but anthocyanins and proanthrocyanidins help your brain produce more dopamine.[10] [11] Or try some goji berries, shown to substantially increase feelings of well-being and improve cognitive performance after only two weeks.

Cancer’s Worst Enemy

There is evidence that berries (particularly blueberries, possibly because they’ve been the most studied) can help protect you from cancer, including breast, colon, liver and melanoma.

Blueberries are found to induce apoptosis (cell death) in virulent breast cancer cell lines. An isolate in blueberries named pterostilbene (related to resveratrol) was shown to selectively kill cancer stem cells and suppress the adverse effects of radiation. In fact, pterostilbene has demonstrated anti-cancer activity against breast, colon, gastric, esophageal and prostate cancers. However, blueberries aren’t the only berries with anticarcinogenic effects. The acai berry shows promise in treating leukemia and colon cancer, as well as supporting overall immune function, metabolism and arthritis. Bilberry inhibits colon cancer and leukemia. Blackberries and black raspberries have been demonstrated to be antiproliferative.

The bottom line is, if you want to capitalize on the healing power of berries, an excellent strategy is to incorporate them into your diet on a daily basis—and the more variety the better. To maximize antioxidant benefits, go organic. One study[12] found that organically grown blueberries have significantly higher concentrations of phenol antioxidants and anthocyanins than conventionally grown, as well as significantly higher total antioxidant capacity.

Each berry has its own special complement of phytochemicals, so add multiple types of berries to your list next time you’re hunting and gathering at your local farmers market.

Berry Special Health Benefits

Cranberry: Sixteen different studies support the efficacy of cranberries for treating and preventing urinary tract infections, but did you know they also combat MRSA?

Strawberry: Improved lipid profile, reduced cardiovascular and type 2 diabetes risk; protection from esophageal cancer; eight strawberries have more vitamin C than a medium sized orange

Raspberry: Support for esophageal cancer, erectile dysfunction and low sperm count

Goji Berry: Protects male reproductive organs from damage by endocrine disrupting chemicals, such as BPA

Black Currant: Support for brain power mood, allergies and rheumatoid arthritis

Elderberry: Inhibits influenza A and B as effectively as amantadine or Tamiflu

Blackberry: Suppo

Schisandra berry: Improves mitochondrial function

Read More At: GreenMedInfo.com
_________________________________________________________________

© November 2nd, 2015 GreenMedInfo LLC. This work is reproduced and distributed with the permission of GreenMedInfo LLC. Want to learn more from GreenMedInfo? Sign up for the newsletter here http://www.greenmedinfo.com/greenmed/newsletter.


References

[1] UC Davis Nutrition and Health Info-Sheet: Some Facts About Phytochemicals

[2] UC Davis Integrative Medicine Program: The Power of Polyphenols July 28, 2015

[3] CDC High Blood Pressure Facts

[4] Johnson SA et al. Daily Blueberry Consumption Improves Blood Pressure and Arterial Stiffness in Postmenopausal Women with Pre- and Stage 1-Hypertension: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial. Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics 2015 March;115(3):369-377

[5] Wallace TC. Anthocyanins in cardiovascular disease. Adv Nutr. 2011 Jan;2(1):1-7. doi: 10.3945/an.110.000042. Epub 2011 Jan 10.

[6] Wei, CJ et al. Risk factors for dementia in highly educated elderly people in Tianjin, China. Clin Neurol & Neurosurg. 2014 July;122:408 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clineuro.2014.04.004

[7] Subash S. et al. Neuroprotective effects of berry fruits on neurodegenerative diseases. Neural Regen Res. 2014 Aug 15; 9(16): 1557–1566.

doi:  10.4103/1673-5374.139483

[8] Currais A. et al. Modulation of p25 and inflammatory pathways by fisetin maintains cognitive function in Alzheimer’s disease transgenic mice. Aging Cell. 2014 Apr;13(2):379-90. doi: 10.1111/acel.12185. Epub 2013 Dec 17. PMCID: PMC3954948

[9] Maher P. Modulation of multiple pathways involved in the maintenance of neuronal function during aging by fisetin. Genes Nutr. 2009 Dec; 4(4): 297–307. doi:  10.1007/s12263-009-0142-5

[10] Dobberstein LJ. “Brain Protective Effects of Proathocyanidins.” Wellness Resources April 7, 2014

[11] Rahman MM. et al. Effects of anthocyanins on psychological stress-induced oxidative stress and neurotransmitter status. J Agric Food Chem. 2008 Aug 27;56(16):7545-50. doi: 10.1021/jf800930s. Epub 2008 Jul 29.

[12]Wang SY. et al. Fruit Quality, Antioxidant Capacity, and Flavonoid Content of Organically and Conventionally Grown Blueberries. J Agric Food Chem. 2008 July; 56 (14):5788–5794  DOI: 10.1021/jf703775r

Top 7 Condiments That Destroy Your Health Faster Than You’d Ever Think

Condiments
Source: NaturalNews.com
S.D. Wells
August 11, 2016

Most health enthusiasts watch what they eat in a major way, not realizing that they may not be vigilant enough in some key areas. Are you struggling to shed those last 10 pounds? Can’t seem to get enough energy for a good workout at the gym? Too tired before and after work to do much at all? Maybe the secret lies in the need for healthy food across the board, not just when considering the main courses you consume and the beverages of which you partake.

Those little “extras” are greatly underestimated in their power to bring you down, slow you down and actually minimize your potential. That’s right: the “man” sneaks poisons into just about anything he can, so when you overlook condiments and don’t “sweat the small stuff,” it just may be what’s sweating you. Maybe your mustard and fermented soy sauce are okay, but there’s a swath of toxic toppings you probably think don’t make up enough of what you consume to make a difference. Except … they do.

Do you ever watch videos where the speakers are raw foodists, or health “fanatics,” or just nutritional experts, and they seem to have a relentless supply of energy, a positive outlook, enthusiasm and passion for life and what they’re teaching? It’s not because they consume canola oil and soybean oil all day, and it’s certainly not because they drink water from the tap and put animal byproducts that contain hormones, antibiotics and harmful bacteria in their bodies. They’re not putting products in their bodies that have been processed, iodized, irradiated, brewed with chemicals, genetically modified or imported from China. Every little bit adds up, and you may want to evaluate everything you’re eating and drinking, including these top seven condiments that destroy health faster than most people would ever even consider.

#1. Most coffee creamers, whether liquid or powder: Liquid creamers often contain soy and carageenan, while the powders contain GMO soy, among other polluted ingredients.

#2. Artificial sweeteners: These sweet devils cause feelings of anxiety, nervousness, depression and for many others, irritable bowel syndrome.

#3. Most mayonnaise: Nearly every mayo on the shelves, including the organic options, contains pesticide-laden soybean and canola oils. It’s hard to find mayonnaise made with non-GMO sunflower oil or vegenaise. Your best bet is to follow a recipe and make your own organic mayonnaise with organic eggs, lemon juice, apple cider vinegar and Dijon mustard.

#4. Most salad dressings, including organic, contain soy and canola oils: They’re flooding the shelves lately, and they’ll absolutely ruin your healthy salad. Don’t let it happen to you. Even organic soy is bad for humans. If soy is not fermented, don’t buy it. And canola oil comes from rapeseed, which is toxic to all animals. Let it go!

#5. Sour cream (loaded with hormones and antibiotics from CAFO cows): Sour cream is dairy based, and if the cows aren’t grass fed and living outside, eating normal organic food, then they’re living in confined animal feeding operations, getting jacked up with artificial growth hormones, shot up with antibiotics and crowded together, walking around in their own feces, with infected udders that produce pus-laden milk. Talk about a condiment that will bring you down and lead to inflammation and excess mucus. Avoid non-organic sour cream at all costs.

#6. Honey: Much of the “honey” sold in America is just HFCS (high fructose corn syrup) that’s genetically modified and/or imported and processed imitation honey from China. (Look for REAL honey from local, trusted sources.)

#7. Iodized salt (irradiated and raises blood pressure): You know how you always hear, “Too much sodium causes high blood pressure?” Well, they’re talking about iodized, irradiated salt, not sea salt, which contains lots of nutritious minerals. Avoid the white salt that’s in just about every shaker at every restaurant in America. Bring your own Himalayan sea salt with you when you go out to eat, and pop your own organic popcorn (with sea salt) and bag it for the movies!

Sweat the small stuff, because it can absolutely ruin the big stuff!

A condiment is any sauce or spice that’s added to food in order to impart a certain flavor, or to enhance existing flavor. In some cultures, condiments complement the dish. The term originally described preserved or pickled foods, but the meaning has shifted over the years. Nearly every condiment at a restaurant, convenience store, work office break room, fast food joint or coffee shop contains ingredients that are processed, genetically modified to contain pesticides and detrimental to your health.

Any medical doctor will tell you that you worry too much, but any nutritional expert will tell you that it all adds up, and that there’s a reason every third person in America gets cancer in their lifetime, while half of the rest suffer from Alzheimer’s, heart disease, strokes, arthritis, osteoporosis, diabetes and other totally preventable health issues.

Start “sweating” the small stuff. Examine all the condiments you’ve been using regularly, and switch them out for some healthy ones. You’ll notice a difference in the way you feel – guaranteed!

Read More At: NaturalNews.com

Sources for this article include:

HealthAwarenessForAll.com

TheHeartySoul.com

NaturalNews.com

NaturalNews.com

7 Reasons Eating Dark Chocolate Supports Healthy Living

Dark chocolate
Source: NaturalNews.com
Amy Goodrich
July 20, 2016

Chocolate has been a long-time favorite of children and adults alike to satisfy a sweet tooth or cure a broken heart.

In the early day’s chocolate was seen as a mood-enhancing aphrodisiac and symbol of luxury and power only available to the wealthiest of people. Once touted as the “food of Gods” for its myriad of health benefits, this popular comfort food received some bad press due to its high fat content.

Despite the wealth of positive coverage, chocolate has long been suspected of worsening acne and increasing the risk for a host of lifestyle illnesses such as heart disease, obesity, diabetes, and cancer.

However, not all chocolate is created equally. The sugar and milk infused chocolate most Americans consume today will not be of much help when it comes to improving your health and happiness.

Dark chocolate, with at least 70 percent cocoa, on the other hand, has been scientifically proven to keep your brain sharp, your heart in perfect condition, and your skin shielded from UV-induced damage.

Here are seven science-backed reasons why you should indulge in this bitter and sweet treat more often.

1. Packed with beneficial nutrients

Dark chocolate with a high cocoa percentage is a good source of healthy fats, fiber, iron, magnesium, manganese, phosphorous, zinc, among many other beneficial plant nutrients. Though, moderation is key as all these nutrients come with a lot of calories and moderate amounts of sugar too.

2. Antioxidant powerhouse

Cocoa houses an impressive amount of powerful antioxidants such as polyphenols, flavanols, and catechins. In the ORAC (Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity) chart, raw cocoa is at the top of the antioxidant list, among other superfoods such as blueberries, goji berries, and pomegranate seeds.

The ORAC scale was developed to measure the effectiveness of antioxidants to neutralize free radicals that may cause damage to DNA, cells, and tissues.

3. Reduce blood pressure naturally

A 2012 study published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, found that moderate consumption of dark chocolate or raw cocoa powder reduced blood pressure and improved insulin levels and blood flow.

4. Improve cholesterol levels

If you are struggling with elevated cholesterol levels, dark chocolate may become your new best friend. Regular consumption has shown to significantly decrease oxidized LDL (bad) cholesterol while improving HDL (good) cholesterol.

5 May Lower cardiovascular disease risk

High blood pressure, elevated LDL cholesterol, and insulin levels have been linked to cardiovascular diseases. As mentioned above, dark chocolate has a positive effect on all three, thus reducing the risk of cardiovascular diseases or death.

One study found that people who ate chocolate five times or more a week had a 57 percent lower risk of developing cardiovascular issues. However, this number is to be taken with a grain of salt as it is based on observational studies and other factors may be at play.

6. Chocolate as a natural sunscreen

Flavanols in dark chocolate may protect against UV-induced damage, improve blood flow to the skin, and increase skin density and hydration.

7. Boost brain health

Lastly, dark chocolate may also boost brain power. It improves blood flow to the brain and has shown to improve memory in elderly people with mental impairment. Cocoa contains caffeine-like substances known to boost short-term brain function.

While the evidence that raw cocoa or dark chocolate can significantly improve your health is definitely out there, remember, that doesn’t give you carte blanche to load up on this sweet, bitter treat.

Keep consumption down to a square or two a day and make sure to buy high-quality and organic dark chocolate with at least 70 percent cocoa. The more cocoa, the better as that is where all the amazing benefits are coming from.

Read More At: NaturalNews.com

10 Foods that Lower Blood Pressure Naturally

Source: HealingPowerHour
Dr. Akilah Schäfer
July 15, 2016

Normalizing blood pressure is one of the most important things you can do to improve your health and increase your life span. Fortunately, there are healthy foods to help achieve this and today I’m going to share with you the top 10 foods that I found to help lower blood pressure naturally.

To Download The Free PDF File Click This Link – http://www.celestialhealing.net/Freeb…