I Was Sprayed With Insecticide Flying to Australia: Linked to Brain Tumors, Parkinson’s

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Source: TheMindUnleashed.com
Cassius Methyl
March 7, 2017

Last week I took a flight from California to Australia.

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After a long 14 hour flight, everyone stood up and eagerly anticipated leaving the plane. Instead of getting off, we were informed that the plane would be sprayed with a “non toxic” insecticide.

insecticide

I quickly grabbed my thick jacket, put my hood over my head, covered my face and made sure every breath I took was filtered through the jacket. Flight attendants walked up and down the isles, spraying the luggage bins and the passengers almost directly.

I waited for about 10 minutes while they made us sit in the fumes. I heard a few people cough. When we finally got up to leave the plane, a flight attendant asked me if I was ok because I was covering my face and I said “of course, just avoiding breathing this, it’s toxic.”

He matter of factly responded “it’s non toxic.” I replied “of course it’s toxic, everything that is an insecticide is toxic.”

What I should have showed him is that flight attendants like him have gotten brain tumors and Parkinson’s Disease, and sued the government for mandating use of insecticide on flights.

According to a December 2013 article from the Daily Telegraph titled “Landmark legal case will probe the link between Parkinson’s disease and insecticide sprays used on long-haul flights”:

“LONG-haul flight attendants who have been forced to spray insecticide through aircraft cabins every time they landed in Australia fear the chemicals may have given them Parkinson’s disease.

And experts have warned any frequent international flyer exposed to repeated doses of insecticide within an enclosed aircraft cabin could also face the same risk.

Former Qantas steward Brett Vollus has been diagnosed with the disease, which can leave victims immobile, speechless or with tremors, and is preparing to launch a legal action against the Commonwealth government, which enforces the need for spraying to prevent disease.

Mr Vollus, 52, worked as flight attendant with Qantas for 27 years up until May this year and was referred to a neurosurgeon as the symptoms of Parkinson’s began to kick in.

Checks also uncovered a malignant brain tumour.”

The former flight attendant Brett Vollus continued:

“We all blindly sprayed this insecticide as we landed in Australia after every long-haul flight. Why wasn’t I warned that it could give me this disease?

This is a nightmare that has ruined my life. I am very keen to start a legal action and if it can help others I am happy to lead the way.”

It’s oddly difficult to research online exactly what insecticides are sprayed on flights. The practice is decades old, with the infamous pesticide DDT being sprayed on flights to Australia from the 1940’s to 70’s .

According to Mother Jones:

“Exposing travelers on domestic flights to dangerous chemicals is not new. From 1944 until the late 1970s, airlines sprayed DDT on their planes, sometimes even while passengers were on board.

And from 1986 to 1996, Northwest Airlines used Bolt, a pesticide that contains chlorpyrifos, a potential nervous system poison. In 1994, the Journal of Pesticide Reform reported that chlorpyrifos may cause symptoms ranging from nausea to convulsions, and may also produce birth defects and other genetic damage in humans.”

The most detailed info I could find about what exactly is being sprayed comes from the first hand experience of a passenger, published at Health Nut News in an article titled “Woman removed by 6 Policemen off her flight for questioning what was being sprayed on her.” Reading from it:

“The most common pesticides used on airplanes are the synthetic pyrethroids permethrin and d-phenothrin (they kill insects by attacking their nervous systems) and studies have linked permethrin with Parkinson’s disease. But remember, the World Health Organization says it’s just fine.

Since the spraying began, passengers have reported flu-like symptoms, sinus issues, rash/hives, headaches, and swollen joints- and that’s just some of what’s been reported; far more serious issues like acute respiratory problems and anaphylactic shock have also occurred. But don’t worry, the WHO says there is no evidence that spraying insecticide in enclosed spaces, onto people, is dangerous.”

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The Australian Department of Agriculture and Water Resources is the agency responsible for overseeing the spraying of insecticide on flights. An Australian government entity that regulates and influences pesticide use is called the Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority.

Sometimes the passengers sit in toxic fumes for the duration of a flight, instead of being sprayed for minutes at the end. According to Traveler:

“What happens now is the Department of Agriculture grants approval to airlines to perform their own disinfection treatment. Disinfection spraying is carried out at the last overseas airport before departure for Australia.

Treatment takes place after catering has been loaded, with the airconditioning system switched off, the overhead bins open and before passengers have boarded. If the required disinfection has not been carried out, the aircraft will be sprayed on arrival prior to passenger disembarkation.”

Another recently developed pesticide in Australia is being hyped as a non toxic alternative, Sero-X. It is made from peptides that naturally occur in a plant. This is probably not going to be sprayed on airplanes though.

In concept it sounds like a viable alternative to neonicotinoids or organophosphates, but if you know the history of pesticides you might find it hard to believe in something like that.

Please share this with any person flying to Australia, because it benefits us to know exactly what we ingest, and how bad ideas become a routine aspect of life we are coerced into accepting.

Read More At: TheMindUnleashed.com

Image credit: Wiki, NT, NH365, TL, Source

“Space Economist” Molly Macauley Murdered

“SPACE ECONOMIST” MOLLY MACAULEY MURDERED
GizaDeathStar.com
Dr. Joseph P. Farrell
August 12, 2016

This strange story was shared by Ms. K.M., and given our space focus this week, a brief look is in order:

Molly K. Macauley, researcher on economics and space science, dies at 59

I want to concentrate on the first four paragraphs here:

Molly K. Macauley, a vice president for research at Resources for the Future, a Washington-based think tank that studies environmental and economic policy, died July 8 in Baltimore. She was 59.

She was stabbed while walking her dogs near her home in Baltimore’s Roland Park neighborhood and was taken to a nearby hospital, where she died. According to the Baltimore Sun newspaper, it was the first homicide in the upscale neighborhood since 1998.

“Homicide detectives are continuing to investigate this case,” Baltimore police spokesman Jeremy Silbert told the Sun.

Dr. Macauley was considered a national leader in the field of environmental economics and helped lead research projects on space, renewable energy, new technologies and natural resources. After joining Resources for the Future in 1983, she developed a specialty in linking economics with space science. Her scholarly interests extended to space stations and eliminating debris in space, as well as commercial opportunities associated with space travel.

In a period that has seen the more-than-suspicious deaths of a lawyer who served a class action suit against the Democratic National Committee for obvious pro-Sanders bias, the equally suspicious deaths of Seth Rich and Victor Thorn, the death of Babylon Five actor and talk show host Jerry Doyle in his Vegas home, and the death of newly-appointed US Space commander Major General John Rossi, I cannot help but think that the sad death of this obviously attractive lady might at least be connected with the latter.

There are a number of questionable points in what little facts are related in this article: (1) Ms. Macauley was walking her dogs when she was stabbed. So the first question, as Ms. K.M. pointed out to me, was what happened to the dogs? Their presence, and the violent manner of her death, suggest that whoever did the killing was known to her, since a stranger doing such might have easily been attacked by the dogs trying to defend their mistress.

Concerning those dogs, the Baltimore Sun indicated that they were not small dogs:

Molly K. Macauley, vice president of an environmental think tank, dies

At night before going to bed, she walked the couple’s two dogs, Wilga, a 71/2-month-old white-and-cream colored wolfhound, and Leo, a dark brown 70-pound Plott hound with a “booming voice. One of the strongest dogs I’ve ever seen,” said Mr. Lasky.

A large 70 pound dog, about which nothing more is said in relation to the murder, raises the stakes, for it does indeed suggest that the murder was known to Dr. Macauley, and perhaps a familiar “scent” to her dogs as well.

(2) Dr. Macauley was linking economics (and therefore, presumably finance) to space issues. And this suggests that Macauley might have run afoul of financial and space interests that did not like where she was going. The question is, where was Dr. Macauley going? A few answers are suggested here:

Molly Macauley, Renowned Space Economist, Killed While Walking Her Dogs – UPDATE 2

You’ll note her specialties:

Macauley was a valued member of the space policy community for decades and renowned for her expertise on the economics of satellites, especially in the earth observation arena. Her professional portfolio was much broader, however, including the use of economic incentives in environmental regulation, climate and earth science, and recycling and solid waste management.  She testified before Congress many times and was the author of more than 80 journal articles, books, and book chapters.

She was Vice President for Research and a Senior Fellow at Resources for the Future, a Washington-based think tank that focuses on the economics of natural resources.  She was a past member of the Space Studies Board (SSB) and of the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board (ASEB) of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine and served on many of its study committees.  She was a member of the steering committee for the ongoing Decadal Survey for Earth Science and Applications from Space at the time of her death.

Earth observation satellites… perhaps Dr. Macauley had “seen something” or learned something she was not supposed to see or learn. Additionally, her focus on the economics of space development and satellites – a specialized field in which she had made a definite mark – suggests that this may have been a prime motivation for the murder. There are the usual theories, including speculation that her murder was racially motivated, but in a period of time that has seen the death of Major General Rossi, I’m not convinced.

There’s something here, but the media is being typically short on analysis and facts, and I don’t know about you, but that raises my suspicion meter into the red zone. And perhaps…

Continue Reading At: GizaDeathStar.com
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Profile photo of Joseph P. Farrell
Joseph P. Farrell has a doctorate in patristics from the University of Oxford, and pursues research in physics, alternative history and science, and “strange stuff”. His book The Giza DeathStar, for which the Giza Community is named, was published in the spring of 2002, and was his first venture into “alternative history and science”.

Moon Express Becomes First Private Company To Get Permission To Go To The Moon

Source: TheCrunch.com
via: AceBreakingNews.com
Emily Calandrelli
August 3, 2016

Moon Express has officially become the first private company in the world to receive permission to travel beyond Earth’s orbit. After months of conversations with government officials, the company received the green light from the FAA to venture to the moon in 2017.

“We are now free to set sail as explorers to Earth’s eighth continent, the Moon, seeking new knowledge and resources to expand Earth’s economic sphere for the benefit of all humanity.” Bob Richards, Co-founder and CEO of Moon Express

The announcement marks an important milestone for private companies in the space industry because, so far, all commercial space activities have been limited to operations within Earth’s orbit.

Moon Express was born out of the Google Lunar X-PRIZE, an international contest with $30 million up for grabs for a private company who can soft-land on the Moon and travel across its surface.

If successful, Moon Express will become the fourth entity in history to soft-land on the Moon. The first three were all superpowers – United States, U.S.S.R. and China – while Moon Express is privately funded and comprised of 26 entrepreneurs and engineers.

It’s important to note that the permission given to Moon Express doesn’t necessarily set a precedent for other companies. Naveen Jain, co-founder of Moon Express, told TechCrunch that this permission is a one-time exception for their company. Jain stated the U.S. government plans to take future requests to travel beyond Earth’s orbit on a case by case basis until laws governing this activity can be passed.

Illustration of Moon Express lander / Image courtesy of Moon Express

Interestingly, the legalities surrounding a private mission to the Moon came about a bit backwards.

First, Moon Express purchased a launch to the Moon with Rocket Lab in October, 2015. At that time, they didn’t have permission from the government to go to the moon or the regulatory security that they could have ownership of lunar resources they obtained if they could get there.

Then, in November, 2015 the Commercial Space Launch Competitiveness Act was passed, which explicitly stated that private companies are allowed full ownership of resources they extract in space. The bill made it legal for Moon Express to mine the Moon and keep what they extracted, but they still didn’t have permission to travel to the Moon in the first place.

This was the last piece of the regulatory puzzle, but from a security point of view, giving this permission to anyone with the resources to go is a bit tricky.

For example, national assets like reconnaissance satellites that monitor specific areas of the Earth are located over 20,000 miles away in geosynchronous orbit (GEO). This is the farthest orbit that private companies have placed satellites in to date. Going beyond this orbit could potentially give a company full view of some of the most important space-based security satellites, making it important for the government to know exactly what a company intends to do on a mission past GEO.

Illustration of Moon Express MX-1 lunar lander / Image courtesy of Moon Express

Because no company had traveled beyond Earth’s orbit before, there wasn’t a plan in place for receiving permission to do so. Jain explained that representatives from multiple federal agencies including the State Department and the National Security Agency worked together to determine that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), which is already responsible for granting launch licenses to rocket companies, should be the official point of contact for this type of activity.

Continue Reading At: TechCrunch.com