Book Review: The Imaginative Argument – A Practical Manifesto For Writers by Frank L. Cioffi

imarg

TheBreakaway
Zy Marquiez
December 7, 2016

This book is absolute dynamite.

The Imaginative Argument – A Practical Manifesto For Writers by Frank L. Cioffi is an unprecedented venture into boundless possibilities that lie on the other side of conformity for writers.

Cioffi stacks the book to the hilt with a vast amount of practical, thoughtful, yet incisive information that allows individuals to see the multitude of possibilities available in argumentation, while still leaving the reader with the versatility to focus and employ their own style in their writing repertoire.

Sourcing authors such as Orwell, Goffman, Benedict, Updike, James, Nabovok and more, the author helps the reader analyze them and view their notable writing idiosyncrasies for the strengths they were, also showing the vast range these writers employed.

The Imaginative Argument is an outside the box, or better yet, a NO-box, type of book that sets depth charges to foundations of traditionalism and strives for something imaginative, something greater, something more meaningful.

Cioffi’s skill in this book is a mixture of equal parts mad scientist and academician that employs mathematical precision merged with the range of an artist who employs the universe as its canvas.  A true perfect fusion of the left and right brain to boot.

That is very, very rare in any type of book, as usually books gravitate towards either taking a polarizing approach either being mechanical, or overly imaginative.  This is one reason why the book appeals to me.

Covered within the confines of this book are all of the major parts of constructing an essay: a solid foundational introduction, a consideration of the audience which is focused on quite a bit throughout the book, a foray into the writing process, a focus on the thesis, arguments, style, and much more.

Even provided at the end of the book are additional sample essays and writing prompts which serve to further one’s practice.

In its totality this book offers a lot of ideas for consideration in respects to writing.  Cioffi’s unique and no-holds bared approach serves to engage the reader quite saliently, also providing a veritable mixture of do’s and don’ts that are not only practical but useful.

Cioffi created an absolute masterpiece in the field of creative argumentation, and for that he should be applauded at length.

Logic & Illogic In Education

Logic
Source: NoMoreFakeNews.com
Jon Rappoport
June 7, 2016

In two of my collections, The Matrix Revealed and Power Outside The Matrix, I include training in the art of logic and critical analysis.

The basic fact is: students in schools are rarely taught how to follow a line of reasoning from beginning to end. Nor do they practice analyzing half-formed, specious reasoning.

Who teaches young students, these days, how to distinguish between a polemic and a formal argument?

Teachers spend little or no time discussing hidden premises or assumptions, which color subsequent arguments.

Increasingly, people are “learning” from watching videos. Some videos are well done; many others intentionally omit vital data and make inferences based on “shocking images.”

A focused study of logic can illuminate a range of subjects and disciplines. It can suddenly bring perspective to fields of inquiry that were formerly mysterious and impenetrable.

Logic is the parent of knowledge. It contains the principles and methods common to all investigation.

Being able to spot and understand logical flaws and fallacies embedded in an article, essay, book immediately lifts the intelligence level.

Logic isn’t a prison; one isn’t forced to obey its rules. But the ability to deploy it, versus not understanding what it is, is like the difference between randomly hammering at a keyboard and typing coherent paragraphs. It’s the difference between, “I agree with what he’s writing,” and “I know exactly how he’s making his argument.”

In the West, the tradition of logic was codified by Aristotle. Before him, Plato, in the Socratic Dialogues, employed it to confound Socrates’ opponents.

Reading the Dialogues today, one can see, transparently, where Plato’s Socrates made questionable assumptions, which he then successfully foisted on those opponents. It’s quite instructive to go back and chart Socrates’ clever steps. You see logic and illogic at work.

High schools today don’t teach logic for two reasons. The teachers don’t understand the subject, and logic as a separate discipline has been deleted because students, armed with it, would become authentically independent. The goal of education rejects independent minds, despite assurances to the contrary.

Continue Reading At: NoMoreFakeNews.com

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Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free NoMoreFakeNews emails here or his free OutsideTheRealityMachine emails here.