How a Sustainable Aquaponics Farm Grows 7000 Heads of Lettuce a Week

Source: GrowingYourGreens
John Cole
November 18, 2016

John from http://www.growingyourgreens.com/ goes on a field trip to Sustainable Harvesters, one of the largest commercial aquaponic farms in texas. You will discover how they are able to grow 7000 heads of lettuce a week using fish to produce fertilizer for the lettuce.

In this episode, John will give you a special tour of this commercial aquaponics farm. First, you will learn how aquaponics is different than hydroponics and which is more sustainable and better for the planet.

Next, you will learn all the different aspects of an aquaponics system and how it works and some of the special practices they do at Sustainable Harvesters that I haven’t seen anywhere else.

You will discover why they don’t add any additional nutrients to their system as well as why the only cultivate a special kind of fish that ensures their aquaponics system stays balanced.

John will then share with you how lettuce is grown from seed to full maturity in 6 weeks at Sustainable Harvesters Aquaponics Farm.

You will discover if Red or Green lettuce requires higher levels of nutrients. You will learn how they are able to cool their greenhouse efficiently using the least amount of energy and how they automatically control the temperature in the winter.

You will learn if green or red lettuce is healthier to eat.

You will also discover a home aquaponics system that you can purchase from sustainable harvesters and put on your patio at home to start growing more of your food today using the proven aquaponics technology they have been growing now for the over 3 years.

You will discover the one secret ingredient they add to their aquaponics system that caused their plants to grow faster and get greener than without it.

You will learn how you can visit Sustainable Harvesters outside Houston, TX to take an aquaponics farm tour or aquaponics class.

Finally, you will learn the one thing you need to do to ensure your success if you will be starting your own business or farm.

After watching this episode, you will have learned what it takes to grow 7000 heads of lettuce a week sustainably using fish and creating systems to ensure everything runs smoothly.

This New Neighborhood Will Grow Its Own Food, Power Itself & Handle Its Own Waste

[Editor’s Note]

Thanks to G.L. for sharing this link.  Its vital information that shows what’s possible when individuals use their imagination to come up with solutions.

<p>In ReGen, any household waste that can be composted will feed livestock or soldier flies; the soldier flies will feed fish.</p>
Source:FastCoexist.com
Adele Peters
May 26, 2016

If you live inside one of the houses in a new neighborhood being built in an Amsterdam suburb, your dining room might be next to an indoor vegetable garden. Outside, you’ll have another seasonal garden. And down the street, almost everything you eat will be grown in high-tech vertical farms.

The neighborhood will be the first ReGen Village, a new type of community designed to be fully self-sufficient, growing its own food, making its own energy, and handling its own waste in a closed loop.

Any household waste that can be composted will feed livestock or soldier flies. The soldier flies will feed fish, and fish waste will fertilize an aquaculture system that produces fruit and vegetables for the homes. Seasonal gardens will be fertilized by waste from the livestock.

By using the most advanced methods for growing food—a combination of aeroponics, aquaponics, permaculture, food forests, and high-yield organic farming—the neighborhood will grow many times more food than a traditional farm of the same size, with fewer resources. Aquaponics, for example, can produce 10 times as much produce on the same amount of land, with 90% less water.

“We anticipate literally tons of abundant organic food every year—from vegetables, fruit, nuts, legumes, fish, eggs, chicken, small animal dairy and protein—that can continually grow and yield in the vertical garden systems all year long as supplement to the seasonal gardens and farming adjacent,” says James Ehrlich, CEO of ReGen Villages, the California-based developer, which will also manage the neighborhood-slash-farm. The company partnered with Effekt, a Danish architecture firm, on the design.

The community will also produce its own energy, using a mixture of geothermal, solar, solar thermal, wind, and biomass. “We’re looking at some very interesting technologies for small-footprint biomass that can take surrounding farm waste and turn that into a consistent energy source in a way that can power these communities in northern Europe even in the dead of winter,” Ehrlich says. A smart grid will distribute power efficiently, sending it to a carport to charge shared electric cars as needed.

A biogas plant will turn any non-compostable household waste into power and water. A water storage system will collect rainwater and graywater and redistribute it to seasonal gardens and the aquaponic system.

It’s the first of a network of similar communities that ReGen plans to build around the world.