It’s Never Been More Important to Support Independent Content Creators


Source: LibertyBlitzkrieg.com
Michael Krieger
June 30, 2017

When I first started this website I didn’t have a plan for monetization. While I certainly believe people should be compensated for hard, useful work, all I wanted to do was read, write and think. The “business side” of running a blog felt like a nuisance and wasn’t something I had much passion or energy for. That hasn’t changed.

What has changed is passively putting third party code like Google Adsense on your website doesn’t really earn someone like me any money. While it was never a significant amount of cash in the first place, it wasn’t totally worthless. At this point it has become basically worthless, but that’s ok. I’m not going to complain about Google. Google doesn’t owe me anything and neither do the corporations that use the network. It was never a smart way for writers, particularly anti-establishment type writers highly critical of our economic system based on cronyism and fraud, to earn money. It never really made any sense, but I went down that road anyway because it was easy and allowed me to focus on what I really cared about, my work. But things have changed.

Advertisers have begun to flex their muscles over the past year or so, with YouTube demonetizing videos with any sort of unconventional political bent. From the advertisers’ perspective this makes perfect sense and there’s no point in complaining about it. This has forced many content producers to shift to a more reader supported model, which I think is far more empowering and healthy in the long-term despite painful short-term hits to revenue. Indeed, we shouldn’t trust any media that relies on large corporate advertisers to fund their “journalism,” as the product will be more like public relations than any hard-hitting truth to power. We’ve already seen that advertisers are willing to flex their muscles when it comes to content they don’t like, and we can expect that to accelerate going forward.

The latest warning sign comes courtesy of a Washington Post policy that forbids employees from disparaging advertisers. The Washingtonian reports:

A new social-media policy at the Washington Post prohibits conduct on social media that “adversely affects The Post’s customers, advertisers, subscribers, vendors, suppliers or partners.” In such cases, Post management reserves the right to take disciplinary action “up to and including termination of employment.”

The Post‘s Guild sent out a bulletin Sunday night protesting the policy. “If you’re like most of us, you probably acknowledged its receipt without reading it,” says the note, which was written by Guild co-chair Fredrick Kunkle.But what you don’t know could hurt you.”

The guild wants to jettison other parts of the policy, which the Post confirms to Washingtonian went into effect on May 1 and applies to the entire company:

  • A provision that prohibits employees from “Disparaging the products and services of The Post’s advertisers, subscribers, competitors, business partners or vendors.”

  • A demand that employees “Refrain from using social media while on your work time, unless using Social Media is an authorized part of your job.”

  • A clause that encourages employees to snitch on one another: “If you have any reason to believe that an employee may be in violation of The Post’s Social Media Policy … you should contact the Post’s Human Resources Department.”

I thought part of the appeal of a billionaire like Jeff Bezos owning a “paper of record” is that it might make it less beholden to large powerful interests than you might otherwise expect. Guess not.

One thing the last twelve months should make clear to everyone reading this is that billionaire-owned corporate media cannot and should not be trusted to provide honest information, and will definitely never challenge the true centers of power in society. This makes the need for independent publishers more crucial than ever, and since such publishers cannot and should not depend on corporate advertisers, readers need to step up and support them. I’m not talking about my work specifically, I’m talking about all of the independent content creators you enjoy. Support all of them.

On Friday, I plan to publish an article outlining my plan for turning Liberty Blitzkrieg into a reader-supported publication in the years ahead. I think that’s the only sustainable way to stay on point, refrain from the temptations of clickbait, and avoid the whims of corporate advertisers and Google.

Stay tuned for more.

Meanwhile, if you enjoyed this post, and want to contribute to genuine, independent media, consider visiting our Support Page.

In Liberty,
Michael Krieger

Read More At: LibertyBlitzkrieg.com

How Advertisers are Influencing Your Subconscious Mind to Get You to Buy From Them…


Source: TheMindUnleashed.org
Chris Walton
May 29, 2015

Advertisers spend millions of dollars each year using psychological techniques that play at the subconscious level to entice you to take actions or buy products that you might not otherwise. They understand that it is the consumer’s subconscious mind that makes most decisions, and they are experts at forming associations between your subconscious programming and their clients’ products and services.

Most of us are exposed to more than 5000 marketing messages every day.

Advertisers design their campaigns to emotionally influence the subconscious in a fleeting instant, with colour, words, images and music. Subliminal (meaning below your conscious threshold) advertising is a hugely popular method of reaching the subconscious, and we are exposed to hundreds of thousands of subliminal messages each year.

Studies exploring subliminal perception show clearly how they influence subconscious processing and action. In one study, two groups of students were shown two different but similar pictures of trees;

One group saw a picture only of the trees. The others saw the second image, which was doctored to also contain an artfully concealed duck.

After studying their image, each group was asked to draw a nature scene and to label it.

The group who had studied the trees that contained the subliminal duck image drew more ducks and related imagery, such as feathers, birds and water, as compared to the other group, who had studied the undoctored image!

In another study, published in the Journal of Advertising, researchers gathered two groups of participants, one shown advertisements with no subliminal images and the other shown advertisements containing sexually subliminal messages.

The first doctored ad was for Marlboro Lights cigarettes, and it showed cowboys on horseback riding through rocky terrain. Subtly blended into the rocks was an image of a penis (yes, a penis). The second ad was for Chivas Regal whisky, and in the bottle a designer had skilfully and subtly blended the image of the back of a nude woman.

Everyone in the study was hooked up to monitoring equipment; instruments that recorded galvanic skin response, which measures stress levels and arousal through the electrical conductivity levels of the skin. Your skin conductivity will react even to subconscious arousal, which is part of the principle on which lie detector tests are based.

Each group looked at the ads (one group the undoctored ads, the other group the ads containing the subliminal images) for only 30 seconds. The result was that the arousal response of the group who saw the advertisements containing the subliminal sexual images was 20% higher than for the group who saw the advertisements without the subliminal messages.

Why do advertisers go to such lengths in their advertising?

Because a stronger emotional subconscious association between an image and a brand/product causes millions of us to make purchasing choices for those products, choices we might not otherwise have made if we had been considering only price, quality and other more independent and impartial factors.

So next time you feel drawn to a product / brand / advert, maybe ask yourself whats really going on…

Read More At: TheMindUnleashed.org
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Sources:

“The Secret Sales Pitch: An Overview of Subliminal Advertising by August Bullock. (2004).”

Subliminal sexual references study: “The Journal of Advertising in 1984.”

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About the Author

Chris Walton is an internationally recognised performance psychologist and consciousness researcher. He is the author of two best-selling books and the creator of the Gamma Mindset System: www.GammaMindset.com.