Book Review: Speed – Facing Our Addiction To Fast & Faster And Overcoming Our Fear Of Slowing Down by Dr. Stephanie Brown Ph.D.

Speed
TheBreakaway | BreakawayConciousness
Zy Marquiez
March 26, 2017

Speed – Facing Our Addiction To Fast & Faster And Overcoming Our Fear Of Slowing Down by Dr.  Stephanie Brown Ph.D. is a thought-provoking and timely book.  The author’s premise is that society is addicted to the fast-paced-no-matter-the-consequences type of lifestyle and this has caused many individuals to become addicted to the high speed of modern times.

This book is split up into two parts.  Part one covers much of what addiction entails and how this modern issue has come about.  Part two offers a pragmatic approach for individuals to regain control of their life by employing proactive solutions.   However, initially, the individual must be willing to change.  Without the acceptance of a problem, no solution can ever be had, no matter how perfect that solution may be.

With a sensible and practical approach, Brown not only shows a healthy dose of examples about how addiction to speed plays out in everyday life, but also hones in on many things individuals can do to take back control of their life.

Streamlining her approach using the concept of AA, Brown carries out a veritable top-down, user-friendly [syn.] process in which individuals can be their best helpers, become their best selves.  Not only does the author consistently speak about the perils of instant gratification that modern fast-paced life brings about, but she’s also cognizant of the limits that we all have.  But mainly, Brown makes it a point to show why the immediate access to information [i.e. phones, cpus, google, etc.] has made many individuals addicts more than they know.

Dr. Brown herself cautions that the addiction to Speed:

“…is outstripping people’s ability to manage, to fulfill all of their responsibilities, and even to cope.  The idea that we literally have at our fingertips the tools to do so much more than we actually have the capacity to do well has created an impossible bind that leads to chronic stress and a sense of failure.  You do not have the ability to be on 24/7 like a computer, but you believe you should be able to keep going, and that you will be able to do so if you only try harder.  And so you push yourself incessantly, creating an addictive spiral.”[1]

Likewise, this kind of addiction has spawned what is called dichotomous thinking, which is best exemplified by:

“The belief that you are either a success or failure, a winner or loser, will drive you to stay in motion.  If you are caught in dichotomous thinking, you might think you are being asked to embrace the opposite of frenzied speed with no limits.  You’ll tried to do everything before you so you’ll do nothing.  This thinking, often believed to be the way smart people operate, is actually false and dangerous when you’re growing up living in a complex world.  Very few complicated decisions can be boiled down to yes or not without careful thought to multiple factors involved and the potential costs.”[2]

Such are the perils part of modern fast-paced society is fraught with, and individuals that need help, if they are to regain control of their lives, not only need to pump the breaks, but need to reset – create a whole new approach.

Dr. Brown doesn’t pretend that it’s going to be easy either, as she cautious the reader to be mindful of the fact that relapse does take place.   That said, being cognizant of what to expect is one way to be ready for what life throws at you, and those preparations will definitely help bring about change as long as one stays the course.

All in all, although the book can be quite repetitive at times given that it speaks of addiction, it does have ample information from which individuals can gain insights from.  In a world where nigh nobody ever stops to take a deep breath, and smelling the roses might make some people give an individual askance glances,  we stand much to gain from the knowing of this book.

If part of society doesn’t realize that the go-go-go fast-paced life that never stops for anything has addiction at its core, then it stands to bottom out once it blindly torpedoes into the next obstacle.  That’s why it would be prudent to keep in mind the information in this book, because odds are we ALL know at least ONE person, if not many, that would benefit from this information.
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Footnotes:

[1]  Dr.  Stephanie Brown Ph.D., Speed – Facing Our Addiction To Fast & Faster And Overcoming Our Fear Of Slowing Down, p. 5.
[2]  Ibid., p. 277.

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This article is free and open source. You are encouraged and have permission to republish this article under a Creative Commons license with attribution to Zy Marquiez and TheBreakaway.wordpress.com.
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About The Author:

Zy Marquiez is an avid book reviewer, researcher, an open-minded skeptic, yogi, humanitarian, and freelance writer who studies and mirrors regularly subjects like Consciousness, Education, Creativity, The Individual, Ancient History & Ancient Civilizations, Forbidden Archaeology, Big Pharma, Alternative Health, Space, Geoengineering, Social Engineering, Propaganda, and much more.

His own personal blog is BreakawayConsciousnessBlog.wordpress.com where his personal work is shared, while TheBreakaway.wordpress.com serves as a media portal which mirrors vital information usually ignored by mainstream press, but still highly crucial to our individual understanding of various facets of the world.

Why do so many Americans continue to choose junk food over healthy food?

Image: Why do so many Americans continue to choose junk food over healthy food?

Source: NaturalNews.com
Isabelle Z.
December 6, 2016

Even though more people than ever are switching to organic food and other healthier choices, the American diet in general remains very unhealthy. With obesity and its related health problems reaching epidemic proportions, many people wonder why Americans continue to make such bad choices when it comes to food.

The problem cannot be blamed on a lack of information, especially not in the Internet Age. While some people still remain largely ignorant when it comes to the dangers of GMOs, for example, most people in the year 2016 realize that junk food is not good for their health.

Other people say that it’s a lack of money that drives people to make poor food choices, with people able to stretch their money a lot further on the McDonald’s $1 menu than in the organic section of a supermarket. This could be part of it, although other calculations have shown that the average amount of benefits provided by food stamps is sufficient for a healthy diet. Organic produce can also be grown at home cheaply, even without a yard.

Some say it’s because Americans are too busy working to make a wholesome meal from scratch, so they just grab whatever prepackaged foods they can find. While that might be true for some people, it doesn’t explain why someone in search of a snack would grab a bag of chips over a banana, solely in the interest of saving time.

Others posit that it’s largely an issue of taste, with people preferring the flavor of potato chips to that of spinach, for example. Again, it seems reasonable, but anyone who has ever taken a serious approach to a clean diet can tell you that there are many flavorful choices out there that do not put your health at risk.

Junk food is addictive, plain and simple

Nevertheless, the idea that it’s a matter of personal preference ties into one of the most compelling reasons people eat junk food: It is highly addictive from a scientific standpoint. In fact, a series of studies have shown that rats can become so addicted to a junk food diet that they would rather starve than eat healthy food, mimicking the addictive pattern that nutritionists see in humans who eat junk food despite knowing better.

Junk food is actually engineered to make people want more, which is why the Lay’s potato chip slogan promising that “No one can eat just one!” is so alarmingly accurate.

Junk food is engineered to trigger overeating

Salt Sugar Fat: How the Food Giants Tricked Us author, Michael Moss, says that Doritos and Coca-Cola are largely successful because of their complex formulas that taste very good but do not have one single prominent flavor that triggers the brain to stop eating.

Meanwhile, he says that Cheetos contain a remarkable number of attributes that make the brain crave more, not the least of which is their ability to melt in your mouth, which tricks your brain into thinking they don’t contain any calories and makes you want to keep eating them. Food companies employ teams of chemists, neuroscientists and physicists to get the ratio of sugar, salt and fat just right to keep people coming back for more.

A study from UNSW’s School of Medical Sciences found that feeding junk food to rats caused them to lose interest in novel foods, an effect that lasted even after being put back on a diet of healthy food. This could be one reason that people who eat a lot of junk food can’t get out of their rut – trying healthier alternatives no longer appeals to them, as they’ve lost their natural preference for variety.

Processed food also tends to contain a lot of sugar, even the savory choices. Americans eat 152 pounds of sugar every year on average. With sugar being eight times more addictive than cocaine, it’s easy to see why so many people are struggling to kick the habit.

As long as food companies keep pumping their foods with chemicals that keep people coming back for more, America’s junk food obsession is not going to go away.

Read More At: NaturalNews.com

Sources include:

TreeHugger.com

NaturalNews.com

NaturalNews.com

NaturalNews.com

NaturalNews.com

Pfizer admits Big Pharma is profiting from addiction; its products support opioid epidemic

Drug addiction

Source: NaturalNews.com
Vicki Batts
September 9, 2016

Well, it only took two decades for Pfizer to admit that opioids are indeed addictive, even when they are used as prescribed. There is also no evidence that opioids are effective for long-term treatment of chronic pain, in spite of the clever and misleading marketing campaigns led by manufacturers.

Opioids cause up to 60 deaths per day in the United States. This shocking figure is part of what finally led to Pfizer’s concessions about their product’s lack of safety. The corporation has recently agreed to disclose that opioids “carry serious risk of addiction—even when used properly,” according to the Washington Post. The company has also agreed not to promote opioid use for off-label purposes that aren’t approved, such as for long-term back pain. Pfizer will also acknowledge that there is no good research on the effectiveness of opioids beyond 12 weeks of use.

Pfizer makes and markets only one opioid product, which is an extended-release product known as Embeda. When it comes to the opioid epidemic, Embeda has not played nearly as large a role as Purdue’s infamous OxyContin. Following a lawsuit by the city of Chicago against Purdue and several other Big Pharma corporations, Pfizer has chosen to willingly draft an opioid marketing policy. They weren’t named in the lawsuit, and there’s no admission of wrongdoing, so it’s very clear that the company is merely trying to “cover all the bases” if you will, and protect themselves from being sued too.

According to the Waking Times, “Chicago’s lawsuit and similar suits brought by Santa Clara and Orange County charge the companies with a two-decade conspiracy to profiteer on opiate sales.” The municipalities have charged a number of pharmaceutical corporations with spreading misleading information that minimized the risk of addiction and flat-out lied about the actual long-term efficacy of their products. Opioid manufacturers have also been charged with “buying the opinions of respected doctors.”

In spite of Big Pharma propaganda, most medical literature indicates that opioid painkillers do not in fact help workers return to work sooner. In fact, research shows that opioids seem to actually delay returns to work. For example, one study found that people who took opioids for at least seven days during their first six weeks of an injury were more than twice as likely to still be disabled and out of work one year later. Another study found that use of an early opioid in morphine-equivalent amounts equaling 450mg or more were disabled for approximately 69 days longer than those who didn’t take early opioids. A California study found that using high-dose opioids tripled time out of work, and led to delayed injury recovery.

For the last decade, Big Pharma has also perpetuated the myth that opioids are great for treating chronic pain, but research has revealed that this is simply not true. Pfizer has even come forward and admitted that there is no good research to indicate the drugs have any value after 12 weeks of use. Research has revealed that over time, opioids can actually make pain worse. The condition is called “opioid-induced hyperalgesia.”

Years ago, the idea of treating pain with narcotics was unheard of, but now it is commonplace. Despite their legal status, prescription opioids are really no different than their illicit counterpart, heroin. They are addictive, and they do kill people. According to the American Society of Addiction Medicine, in 2014 there were 47,055 lethal drug overdoses in the US. Of those deaths, 18,893 deaths were related to prescription pain relievers. Those statistics show that opioids are attributed to roughly 40 percent of all overdose deaths.

The organization also reported that according to 2014 statistics, 1.9 million Americans had a prescription painkiller substance abuse problem. Comparatively, 586,000 people had a substance abuse disorder involving heroin.

There are nearly four times as many people in this country abusing prescription pain medication than there are people using heroin, and yet for some reason, these drugs continue to remain perfectly legal. Can you believe that?

Read More At: NaturalNews.com

Sources:

WakingTimes.com

Science.NaturalNews.com

ASAM.org[PDF]

Drastic 300% rise in babies born already addicted to heroin, opioids, painkillers

[Editor’s Note]

A great book that covers the disturbing trend of America’s increase in drug use [while nothing gets cured, mind you] is the book below written by Dr. Abramson:

Overdo$ed America – The Broken Promise Of American Medicine

Opioids
Source:NaturalNews.com
Isabelle Z.
August 17, 2016

The number of babies who are born addicted to opioids has tripled in just 15 years in our country. It’s a shocking statistic that underscores just how far opioid addiction reaches. In 1999, 1.5 babies in every 1,000 births were born addicted to opioids and placed into a withdrawal program immediately. A new CDC report shows that the number had risen dramatically to 6 babies per 1,000 births by 2013.

Some areas of the country have been particularly hard hit. In West Virginia, for example, just 0.5 cases of opiate addiction were noted per 1,000 births in 1999. In 2013, however, the number had skyrocketed to 33.4. Maine and Vermont have also recorded similarly disturbing rises.

Statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) show that 78 Americans die each day from an opioid overdose, and this is being largely attributed to the rising numbers of people who take prescription painkillers.

Many cases going unreported

A law passed in 2003 requiring hospitals and social services to report and help drug-dependent newborns and their families has been largely ignored, with just nine states routinely following it. This means that the majority of the children who were born to addicted mothers were not being reported, and it is believed that medical workers were reluctant to involve child protective services.

Sadly, more than 110 babies have died under preventable circumstances since the year 2010, after being sent home with families who were not prepared to take care of them. This estimate is believed to be on the low end.

A new law put in place last month, the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act, assures a non-punitive approach that will allow newborns to remain with their parents while they receive extra help.

Opioid use rampant in America

Last year, a team of researchers from Vanderbilt University Medical Center discovered that some pregnant women who took opioid painkillers were prescribed the medication for no clear reason, placing their babies at unnecessary risk. Withdrawal symptoms experienced by these drug-dependent babies include fever, low weight, sweating, vomiting and excessive crying.

Their study of more than 112,000 pregnant women on Medicaid found that 28 percent had been prescribed at least one opioid painkiller at some point in their pregnancy.

They also found that the infant’s risk was influenced by factors such as the type of prescription opioid, the length of use, the number of cigarettes the mother smoked, and if they took SSRI antidepressants at the same time.

The lead researcher, Dr. Stephen W. Patrick, said that the low birth weight noted in opioid-addicted babies posed even more long-term health risks than being born with neonatal abstinence syndrome.

Americans consume around 81 percent of the world’s supply of oxycodone, and it’s estimated that as many as four out of every five heroin users started out by taking opioid painkillers. The CDC recently stepped in and released 12 guidelines to advise doctors on responsible opioid prescription practices. CDC Director Thomas Frieden said at the time: “We know of no other medication routinely used for a nonfatal condition that kills patients so frequently.”

Drug manufacturers worked hard to try to prevent the CDC from releasing the new guidelines, but they only managed to delay them. There is a lot of money at stake here, with a Stanford University report showing that the sales of prescription opioids have climbed by more than 300 percent since 1999 – the same rise as that noted in the number of babies born addicted to these drugs.

Pregnant women who are dealing with pain should do everything in their power to avoid taking opioid painkillers. If your doctor prescribes this drug to you and tries to minimize the risks, be firm and ask if there are any non-opioid alternatives you can take. You can also try to manage some types of pain using natural methods such as meditation and yoga. Besides avoiding dangerous medications, pregnant women should also eat a healthy diet and ensure that their home has clean air to help give their baby a healthy start to life.

Read More At: NaturalNews.com

Sources include:

DailyMail.co.uk

NaturalNews.com

NaturalNews.com

Is Sugar As Addicting As This Drug?

Source: iHealthTube.com
Dr. Holly Lucille
July 2, 2016

We know sugar is bad for us, but do we really know the extent of it? Dr. Holly Lucille discusses refined or added sugar and just how big of a problem it is for us today. She also stresses the importance of really understanding and educating yourself to look at what you’re eating. Find out if sugar is as addicting as this illegal drug?

Babies born hooked on opiates; others over-medicated by doctors

Source: NaturalNews.com
By:
December 30, 2015

The birth of a baby should be a joyous occasion for a family. However, over the past decade, over 130,000 babies in the United States have been born with drug addictions, making the experience anything but happy. Many times, the babies – if they’re lucky enough to survive – shake uncontrollably, one of the many outward physical expressions of being born addicted to drugs.(1)

According to a video posted by the global news community, AJ+, the problem arises when the baby’s mother uses opiates while pregnant. The National Institute on Drug Abuse explains opioids as medications that are taken to relieve pain. Morphine, oxycodone and hydrocodone fall into this category, although the list is extensive.(1,2)

Heroin is one such drug – and a powerful, highly-addicting one at that. Because it crosses the blood-brain barrier very quickly, people using it are said to experience an intense “rush.” In addition to helping to alleviate pain, heroin – considered a semi-synthetic opiate – is known to create a state of bliss among users.(3)

Shooting heroin while in labor; accidentally suffocating a baby while high

Sadly, heroin is just what Clorissa Jones was shooting while in labor.

“I was in labor, in the bathroom shooting heroin, about to give birth to my child,” she says. Her child, a boy named Jacoby, was indeed born addicted to heroin. He joins his younger brother Braxton, who was born addicted to methadone.(1)

She’s not alone.

Another mom, Reanne Pederson, says that her baby died when she accidentally suffocated him. She makes no excuses for the reason behind the horrible act: She was high when she did it. “You’re so clouded when you’re using and when you’re an addict, you think everything you’re doing is OK …”(1)

Of the problem, pediatrician Dr. Lauren Jansson says, “It is a crisis; it is [an] epidemic. The opioid crisis in this country is continuing to expand exponentially.”(1)

What causes this terrible epidemic? Our over-medicated society, perhaps?

Which, of course, begs the question: Why? How is it possible that it’s gotten so out of control, especially when the U.S. law mandates that hospitals report drug-dependent babies to social services (which, by the way, clearly isn’t happening). How is it that since 2010, at least 110 infant deaths have occurred, which could all have been prevented?(1)

Naturally, every person’s reason for turning to opioids differs, as does their decision to turn to them for recreational, rather than medical, purposes.

But let’s face it, the United States is an over-medicated society. It’s no secret that prescriptions are given to patients like water, with the medical system opting to make a profit off their patients instead of truly getting to the root cause of their health problems. Knee pain? Here’s a pill. Get lots of headaches? Take this. On and on it goes; pill-popping is almost an accepted norm in society for those in pain. Overall, people have easy access to medications which they could ultimately become addicted to and use inappropriately.

Drugs are even being given to perfectly healthy babies … So, if they aren’t born with a health problem, they’re bound to get one

Even our water system is riddled with drugs; it’s not uncommon for hospitals and everyday citizens to flush their meds down toilets and drains, putting millions of pounds of medications – from highly toxic chemicals like those found in cancer treatments, to hormones – in the sewer system.(4)

Continue Reading At: NaturalNews.com