How a Sustainable Aquaponics Farm Grows 7000 Heads of Lettuce a Week

Source: GrowingYourGreens
John Cole
November 18, 2016

John from http://www.growingyourgreens.com/ goes on a field trip to Sustainable Harvesters, one of the largest commercial aquaponic farms in texas. You will discover how they are able to grow 7000 heads of lettuce a week using fish to produce fertilizer for the lettuce.

In this episode, John will give you a special tour of this commercial aquaponics farm. First, you will learn how aquaponics is different than hydroponics and which is more sustainable and better for the planet.

Next, you will learn all the different aspects of an aquaponics system and how it works and some of the special practices they do at Sustainable Harvesters that I haven’t seen anywhere else.

You will discover why they don’t add any additional nutrients to their system as well as why the only cultivate a special kind of fish that ensures their aquaponics system stays balanced.

John will then share with you how lettuce is grown from seed to full maturity in 6 weeks at Sustainable Harvesters Aquaponics Farm.

You will discover if Red or Green lettuce requires higher levels of nutrients. You will learn how they are able to cool their greenhouse efficiently using the least amount of energy and how they automatically control the temperature in the winter.

You will learn if green or red lettuce is healthier to eat.

You will also discover a home aquaponics system that you can purchase from sustainable harvesters and put on your patio at home to start growing more of your food today using the proven aquaponics technology they have been growing now for the over 3 years.

You will discover the one secret ingredient they add to their aquaponics system that caused their plants to grow faster and get greener than without it.

You will learn how you can visit Sustainable Harvesters outside Houston, TX to take an aquaponics farm tour or aquaponics class.

Finally, you will learn the one thing you need to do to ensure your success if you will be starting your own business or farm.

After watching this episode, you will have learned what it takes to grow 7000 heads of lettuce a week sustainably using fish and creating systems to ensure everything runs smoothly.

Published by

BreakawayConsciousness

Zy Marquiez is an avid book reviewer, an open-minded skeptic, yogi, and freelance writer who regularly studies subjects such as: Consciousness, Education, Creativity, The Individual, Ancient History & Ancient Civilizations, Forbidden Archaeology, Big Pharma, Alternative Health, Space, Geoengineering, Social Engineering, Propaganda, and much more. His own personal blog is BreakawayConsciousnessBlog.wordpress.com where his personal work is shared, while TheBreakaway.wordpress.com serves as a media portal which mirrors vital information usually ignored by mainstream press, but still highly crucial to our individual understanding of various facets of the world. My work can also be found on https://steemit.com/@zyphrex.

5 thoughts on “How a Sustainable Aquaponics Farm Grows 7000 Heads of Lettuce a Week”

  1. Awesome post as usual. I just wanted to note something of importance. I am downloading this video right now, because you cannot count on Youtube, or others, to make sure this information remains available to everyone. Big corporations have them taken down all the time because they do not want the people to be self reliant, or aware of their horrible crimes against nature. Please be a weirdo like me and back these videos up to hard drives. Portable drives can easily be filled with documentaries and “How To” videos, because the fact is, if the net ever did fall, we would have to rebuild it. I’m ready with my contribution. Are you?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Great minds think alike. Do that rather regularly ‘just in case’ and have for many years now. Have always been worried about them taking them and other salient videos down. And its not weird its prudent and common sense for sure. Appreciate the comment.

      Liked by 1 person

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