Monsanto & Bayer Finding It Tough To Be Agriculture Conglomerates These Days

agribusiness
Source: TheDailyBell.com
June 15, 2016

Is it conceivable that the planet’s most vilified company could be the one that feeds it?  That, in short, is precisely what Monsanto hopes it can do. “They believe they’re feeding the world, and there’s no other good way,” Connelly says. “Confidence that they’re doing the right thing has blinded them to the fact that they need to be out there defending it.” – Fortune

As usual, Monsanto is the center of a lot of attention. Bayer is making a huge bid for the company and Monsanto is trying to reinvent itself as a kind of agricultural data guru.

Monsanto is going to combine farming and various kinds of agricultural and climate data with its core ag-chem products to increase yields and offer innovative approaches on a massive scale.

So its execs believe.

Monsanto has never focused on data as an ag tool from what we can tell. But the company has certainly made an impact with its chemical products.

Monsanto produced the toxic defoliant Agent Orange during the Vietnam war and developed and marketed DDT, as well, a pesticide that apparently proved so deadly it is now banned.

Today, the company is under regular fire for its GMO emphasis – the production of genetically modified foods and seeds. Some studies have shown GMOs cause cancer. Others have not.

The public generally distrusts Monsanto. In fact, “distrust” is probably too mild a description of public sentiment when it comes to Monsanto.

Monsanto has been attacked for its treatment of farmers. It regularly sues farmers who by mistake grow Monsanto modified crops because M0nsanto seeds have accidentally drifted into their fields.

Large parts of Bayer’s businesses are similar to Monsanto’s, but Bayer is not currently so deeply despised as Monsanto by environmental groups and the general public.

The company produces pesticides and seeds, just as Monsanto does but is losing share in the agricultural market. A merger with Monsanto would make Bayer the undisputed king of various forms of agricultural supply, including seeds.

Of course, Bayer has its own problems with environmentalists because of its GMO production and some believe the combined company would simply infect Bayer with Monsanto’s PR problems.

Monsanto, itself, doesn’t seem overly-enthusiastic about Bayer’s advances. It  just turned down a bid by Bayer of some $67 billion, though Monsanto officials claim they are still willing to pursue talks.

Monsanto is probably better off with Bayer than without, given the continually rising antipathy it is experiencing. The Fortune article points out that Monsanto executives don’t even seem to realize how much the company is hated.

This is probably affecting the company’s value. Over the past year or so, the company’s share price has dropped by double digits.

The downturn has a number of causes, including slumping agricultural prices. But certainly the ongoing barrage of criticism the company faces (and resultant lawsuits) are generating increasingly negative results.

And here is a more radical, libertarian thought: Ideally, neither Bayer nor Monsanto would exist.

As we’ve often pointed out, such large corporations are artificial constructs of judicial decisions. Corporate personhood, guarantees of intellectual property rights and patents and central bank fiat money all make multinationals possible.

The “market” has nothing to do with it. Without such judicial fiat, no company could grow to the size of Monsanto or Bayer.

With such size and wealth, abuses inevitably occur. The very dominance of such entities encourages business practices and products that would not be produced by more modest-sized entities.

The products and services that such titanic companies must produce may not be necessary or even beneficial, but they will be produced and aggressively marketed because they are necessary to the bottom line.

Continue Reading At: TheDailyBell.com

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BreakawayConsciousness

Zy Marquiez is an avid book reviewer, an open-minded skeptic, yogi, and freelance writer who regularly studies subjects such as: Consciousness, Education, Creativity, The Individual, Ancient History & Ancient Civilizations, Forbidden Archaeology, Big Pharma, Alternative Health, Space, Geoengineering, Social Engineering, Propaganda, and much more. His own personal blog is BreakawayConsciousnessBlog.wordpress.com where his personal work is shared, while TheBreakaway.wordpress.com serves as a media portal which mirrors vital information usually ignored by mainstream press, but still highly crucial to our individual understanding of various facets of the world. My work can also be found on https://steemit.com/@zyphrex.

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