Fed On JP Morgan: Your Bank’s “Wind Down Plan” Is…

 FED ON JP MORGAN: YOUR BANK’S “WIND DOWN PLAN” IS ...

Source: GizaDeathStar.com
Dr. Joseph P. Farrell
April 25, 2016

Mr V.K. sent this article along, and when you read it, I think you’ll see why he did. But the problem is, where to “file’ it, because its contents are so stunning. Here’s the article:

The Fed Sends a Frightening Letter to JPMorgan and Corporate Media Yawns

The crux of the problem, I suggest, is outlined by the following paragraphs:

  1. All the “big banks” are overexposed to each other as a result of trading “bad derivatives” paper

A rational observer of Wall Street’s serial hubris might have expected some key segments of this letter to make it into the business press. A mere eight years ago the United States experienced a complete meltdown of its financial system, leading to the worst economic collapse since the Great Depression. President Obama and regulators have been assuring us over these intervening eight years that things are under control as a result of the Dodd-Frank financial reform legislation. But according to the letter the Fed and FDIC issued on April 12 to JPMorgan Chase, the country’s largest bank with over $2 trillion in assets and $51 trillion in notional amounts of derivatives, things are decidedly not under control.

At the top of page 11, the Federal regulators reveal that they have “identified a deficiency” in JPMorgan’s wind-down plan which if not properly addressed could “pose serious adverse effects to the financial stability of the United States.” Why didn’t JPMorgan’s Board of Directors or its legions of lawyers catch this?

Then, a little farther down the page:

How could one bank, even one as big and global as JPMorgan Chase, bring down the whole financial stability of the United States? Because, as the U.S. Treasury’s Office of Financial Research (OFR) has explained in detail and plotted in pictures (see below), five big banks in the U.S. have high contagion risk to each other. Which bank poses the highest contagion risk? JPMorgan Chase.

In other words, folks, the big banks were busily pumping up each other’s ledger sheets by trading the credit defaul swaps/derivative bundles (and bundles of bundles), one key component of which were mortgages (many of them fraudulent), and when the housing bubble burst…well, you know the story.

But now comes a second point in the article, and it’s a stunner”

Continue Reading At: GizaDeathStar.com

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Joseph P. Farrell has a doctorate in patristics from the University of Oxford, and pursues research in physics, alternative history and science, and “strange stuff”. His book The Giza DeathStar, for which the Giza Community is named, was published in the spring of 2002, and was his first venture into “alternative history and science”.

 

Published by

BreakawayConsciousness

Zy Marquiez is an avid book reviewer, an open-minded skeptic, yogi, and freelance writer who regularly studies subjects such as: Consciousness, Education, Creativity, The Individual, Ancient History & Ancient Civilizations, Forbidden Archaeology, Big Pharma, Alternative Health, Space, Geoengineering, Social Engineering, Propaganda, and much more. His own personal blog is BreakawayConsciousnessBlog.wordpress.com where his personal work is shared, while TheBreakaway.wordpress.com serves as a media portal which mirrors vital information usually ignored by mainstream press, but still highly crucial to our individual understanding of various facets of the world. My work can also be found on https://steemit.com/@zyphrex.

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